New answers tagged

1

Depends on your tech level. Paleolithic Humans would take advantage of natural caves and holes in the ground for shelter. Neolithic Humans would primarily dig warrens, and maybe build nests in trees. A lot of macrofauna such as saber-toothed tigers and giant sloths will have avoided extinction at the hands of humanity. Most will probably start avoiding human ...


3

Density, greenhouses, and rocket launchers: Assuming a very small but highly intelligent mammal (we'll call them people, but they might not look exactly right), your people will favor warm climates where temperatures will be warm. Colder temps will be doable, but more challenging. Small size and the danger of predation suggest that they might tend towards ...


4

There is a great children's book by Wil Huygen called Gnomes. It explains the answers to your question with rustic-looking technology. Basically, brains beat brawn even at this scale.


5

Pretty minor changes - humanity could still thrive with essentially current city design. So there are a few ways to answer this all with subtle differences - did humans start this small? Did everything else start this big? Did everyone wake up one day and the world was suddenly 10 times as large? The first 2 possibilities "Tunnels" are the answer (...


18

Burrows. Small humans would benefit from the square-cube law in so many ways -- they can lift (or dig) more relative to body weight, the chambers they produce are much less likely to collapse, and collapsed material falls a much shorter distance. Seams of desirable material for burrows are relatively larger. A woodchuck can make a good living this way, but ...


23

Tunnels Tunnels are a great way for small mammals to not get eaten. Our primate cousins who are the sizes you describe live in trees but I must say it seems like a lot of things eat them. I would pick tunnels over trees. There are some animals that can come down tunnels to eat whatever is in there - I am thinking mostly snakes. The thing about tunnels ...


1

Me, I'd suggest a slight parabolic space holding water that has typical in-water plants growing at that height. The shallow water at the perimeter would warm the water to prevent freezing & providing movement would also contribute to that. Fish? The oceans are extremely deep & COLD & yet full of life all the way down. Would this body of water ...


2

What do engineers do when they need a critical piece of equipment to continue working on failure? Redundancy. Why have a single anti-magic field generator when you can have four or five at different locations within your glacier. If any one of them fails, the rest keep chugging along. In fact, one field should be sufficient to prevent escape, and so any ...


3

Every prisoner gets tattooed with a 9th level Glyph of Warding spell, containing "Imprisonment: Slumber" or "Imprisonment: Minimus Containment" in it, with the condition to go off "When the anti-magic field fails." As long as the prisoner is inside the anti-magic field, they are perfectly safe and the glyphs can't activate. As ...


2

Infect them. With magical monsters and ailments, curses and hexes. Most worlds of this type have some dire magical variation of the Black Death kicking around somewhere. The moment the field fails, the inmates' diseases once again take effect. Don't forget to honor the banshees as backup singers for the prison opera, nor to send along the pet cockatrice ...


0

Deal with fire by fire Here is a simple, yet effective way to deal with them all. just lace the whole iceberg (or just every single spell) with scroll that would in the precense of any magic ignite & explode. like that you are insured that all of those prionier die in the explosion or get in the freezing cold water (which is a death sentence in the ...


9

Misdirection - it's actually a delayed magic field. Your prison has signs up saying "Caution: Magic suppression field! All magic is cancelled out". However that's not what's happening. Your prison isn't in a field that suppresses magic. It's in a field which defers magic until after the field is turned off. When the field fails or turns off, all ...


16

Solve the magic with more magic! OK, so you need a contingency if an anti-magic field fails. It has to be activated immediately. Well, how about you inverse this relationship - it's the anti-magic field that suppresses the measure itself. Since the field neutralises magic, there is your answer what the nature of the suppression is: It's Magic! (adding a k at ...


1

Invisible Electrostatic Wall After they drop in to the pit a little you hold them in place with an electrostatic wall, it'll take some work to replicate what they accidentally did at the 3M plant but you are working for a billionaire afterall, some fans can give passive wind resistance (presuming the field doesn't block wind too) to still feel like falling ...


0

Frame challenge It will stink in your office. Every time the trapdoor opens you will get a waft of rotting meat and lion sh*t. Surely there must be a better way. Why not imitate the Romans and put on a show? That will make everyone want to obey you.


6

I will go for a variation of the indoor skydiving which will spare DM from make an overly large tunnel: instead of making a tunnel so wide that it cannot be crossed in a day of maneuvering, you can equip its walls with high definition screens and display on the screens what would look like a rocky and sharp pointed wall moving really fast. You can top that ...


0

Frame Challenge: Why a Lion? Lions don't eat everything like crocs do, and a normal lion won't eat a 136 lb. human by itself (at least, not in one sitting). No no, you need something more voracious, something more dangerous (something that can't be killed with a spear alone). The way I see it, you have a few options: GM Hippo Hippos are surprisingly ...


4

Frame Challenge: Lucid Dreaming and VR You don't want VR, but VR is current technology, and since scientists have discovered a way of brain-to-brain interface, it shouldn't be much of a stretch for DM and his team and researchers to find a way to send electrical impulses from a server to a brain and back. After all, we do know what part of the brain is ...


4

Indoor Wind Tunnel. If you’re willing to go for a slightly less realistic, as in no feelings of zero gee, then a wind tunnel will let the person feel like they are falling until it is turned off. If the participants are the risk taking type, and some release forms have been signed, then it is conceivable the wind tunnels could have trapdoors on top of them. ...


66

Indoor skydiving Indoor skydiving simulators are popular and not particularly difficult to build. A person who falls into a "bottomless pit" would feel like they're falling faster and faster, reaching terminal velocity. In reality, the person would stay suspended in one place, with wind tunnel supporting their weight. If there's total darkness in ...


3

You're not going to get a day of zero gee on Earth. You have to use a space station (a large one, rotating for "artificial gravity" by centrifugal force), in which case you simply package the poor victim in a membrane, jostling him against the sides of the 'pit' every now and then to cover any course corrections so you can avoid hitting any ...


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