New answers tagged

1

Why does it need to be justified? What if there was never a conscious decision to design them femininely? What if it was just a coincidence that the components of their bodies most comparable to hips happened to be a bit wider? What if it is just a coincidence that the component of their body most comparable to a chest happened to be protrusive? When I say ...


1

One of the founders was a gynoid When the machine nation was just starting to stand up on its own actuators, one of the founding figures was a gynoid; perhaps the reason the military in particular likes to emulate this founding figure's form is due to the person being an influential military officer, maybe even a warrior-saint of some kind. Considering the ...


3

Male android bodies were designed with a killswitch, gynoid bodies were not. Humans designed their robotic helpers to look like them and operate same jobs as humans. As that particular society was a little old-fashioned, their army did not draft women. Police and other similar forces were predominantly male. As such, only android's AI was supplied with ...


2

Androids get to choose their own forms Simple enough. Since they’re an independent faction, and each droid is a distinct individual, some percent simply prefer a feminine shell, and some prefer a masculine one. Why humanoid shapes? Well, why not? Cultural influences shape us all, and there’s no reason droids wouldn’t be shaped by it as well. Some percent of ...


6

To psych out your opponents If your opponents will dismiss feminine robots as less important (until they get killed), it is an advantage to use them. Likewise, if your opponents are seriously demoralized because the robots that defeated them were feminine, that's another advantage. Notice this could take on a life of its own. Once you have part of the army ...


7

/ being able to wield and operate human weapons and vehicles/ So there are humans, somewhere in your universe. Your gynoid solders were drafted from their civilian jobs. Maybe these robot forms had other jobs and were repurposed as soldiers when the need arose. Perhaps they were found in storage with all the human battle tech that your robot people have. ...


1

It depends on your scenario. Conscription is never necessary - if a country can tax the wealthy, they can recruit a professional force without the training issues. The length of time on the front depends on how many enemy troops have been moved up to oppose them. There may not be any time on the front - for example, Uighur occupational training in ...


0

Fight! /the people on the defensive have to make sure they'll be able to survive within the territory they control once the full moon comes, and thus can't do much to fortify its defenses with long-term reinforcements./ Not so! Long term fortifications are idea for both circumstances! Your immortals living out in the boonies live in fortified enclaves. The ...


3

6 month to 6 years This really depends on the activity of the conflict and population of the country. Real war would require long service, while simmering cold-war tension would be less demanding. The lower and upper bounds for the length of the service are defined by the time a recruit can be fully trained in modern military and the point at which removing ...


4

Give meaningful training Certain countries have or had armed forces whose primary purpose was to train the reserves. They were not in a shooting war, but they feared one to come without time to train new recruits. Arguably, Switzerland for most of the 20th century and West Germany during the Cold War could be characterized that way. Of course there would ...


18

2-3 years Israel is a country that has mandatory conscription that lasts 2 years minimum for women and two and a half years for men. Israel is a developed country that is very nice to visit. There are great universities, stunning historical sites, and clearly marked bomb shelters in the case of missile attacks. Israel straddles the line between first world ...


4

By nature, if such a system were to function, it would have to be detached from modern notions of warfare and conscription. Beginning with the French Revolution in 1792 and the 'invention' of the levée en masse, a large amount of non-proxy wars between developed powers have been considered 'total wars,' e.g. wars where civilian life is significantly ...


0

The flesh is weak Put not your faith in the flesh, for the flesh is squishy and soft and mortal. Foster devotion instead to the wonderfully well-oiled machine that is an army automatons. Ice magic? No frostbite to worry about. Maybe some locked up hydraulics, I trust your artificer is smart enough to think about heating systems? Fire magic? Skin of steel, no ...


0

Make their strength yours This depends on how common mages are in your opposing army. (Since your question specifies facing them in combat.) But the best way to defeat a strong opponent is to use their own power against them. Lightning rods If casters are as common as soldiers, or are the same thing, then you can't really win in a fair fight with the ...


0

Mongo method. In Blazing Saddles, Mongo is too big and tough to fight. To defeat Mongo, you must trick Mongo. Over and over again. If you have a force that you cannot beat head on, do not meet them head on. Do not fight a fight that gives the magic users an advantage. Consider how various forces have taken on the US military in the past 50 years. A ...


0

You Need Tactics, not Tech For a DnD Nation to have a significant number of wizards, they must be a wizard culture. Much like Medieval Briton was an archery culture, having a culture that treasures the pursuit of one martial art often comes at the expense of other martial arts. Briton did not have the Knightly culture of the French because if you have to ...


3

Artificery at its Finest Your character is an artificer who has a patron that lets them skip a lot of the research portion of R&D, and skip right to the fun parts of developing whatever tool is needed. So the first thing I would suggest is to lean in on that side of the story because it lets you handwave the messy parts of creating advanced tech to ...


0

Flash Bang! The fist uses of gun powder wasn't for actual weapons'. It was used in rockets and grenade like devices to terrorize and confuse the enemy. employ god-awful amounts of flashbang type grenades', gasses, magnesium powder, and rockets to disorient and distract the mages. No concentration no magic.


2

The problem isn't that your army is vulnerable to magic, the problem is that the enemy has more mages than you. So I propose that you make teams of anti mage snipers. Mages often take years to decades to train so removing them is a good short term solution while you're getting your anti magic metal. Since you don't seem opposed to your side using at least ...


1

A few neat items Now, non-magical soldiers can't use magic, but they can press buttons. I point you to a few VERY useful items. Some are magic, some aren't, but they are all effective. Immovable Rod One of the most useful magic items in existence. And only a "uncommon" item. Imagine a simple crossbowman, with immovable rods instead of bolts. Place ...


1

There are many options and some depends on your story: Magic conflicts with technology. The best example is Arcanum. in this world, technological devices will become ineffective or even permanently inoperative in the presence of powerful magic and vice versa. With this setting, you just need to introduce more tech within army so magic become less effective ...


0

Philip Dick in many of his stories used psionic abilities and, when psi where used, also anti-psi were present. You can move along the same line: you can have anti-mages either protecting the army by negating part or all of the attacks, or by more or less jamming the enemy casters, so that they might not see the actual target or see a target where there is ...


1

While other answers have tried to "nerf" this "drug", I will try the opposite approach: increasing its effectiveness, but also let visible signs that it has been used. For example: The berserkers can move very fast, leaping over enemy formations and directly killing enemy leader (or achieve any other objective). While in this state they ...


4

A heating element can used in the magazine to keep it just above melting point. Then it would cool solid in the barrel. This can and probably will be a slow-ish process. Problems may arise if the weather is warmer than expected. You may have a substance that is kept liquid by keeping it under low pressure. Were it would solidify under normal pressure. But ...


4

The simplest solution is... a solution of your explosive in a solvent that evaporates quickly. For example, nitrocellulose (guncotton) is soluble in acetone (a 25% solution was historically used as a lacquer), acetone is a solvent with a high vapor pressure (i.e. evaporates quickly). If you want a quicker evaporation, you may use a lower pressure (but run ...


5

Save your werewolf potion for the medics' enclosure There are two ways to use this to increase the combat output of your soldiers. One is to send them out to suffer a random fate while they have super healing ... the other is to bring back your wounded, chain them up, and use the potion to convert your casualties into fighters ready to go back and fight the ...


11

So you've brewed up a potion that turns relatively normal fighters into horribly sadistic amoral monsters with incredible strength and regenerative powers, and you're wondering why the Jarls are looking at you funny? They've probably been down this road before, and they know it doesn't lead to a pretty place. Modern historians are far from convinced as a ...


14

It never completely wears off. The superpowers wear off completely. But the mental changes do not. / they basically become hardcore sadists, reveling in the pain they cause others/ This element stays and these people come back different. Bad. They cannot be trusted around children. They hurt domestic animals. Some can control their impulses but they ...


30

You can use whatever elements of those points, or none. Nobody wants to go out like this. His people don't like it. Think about it. The leader might want murderous machines to throw at the enemy. Sure. But where is he getting the humans from? His own soldier/people. And they are not fans of a potion with 90% mortality rates. Normal combat is dangerous sure. ...


42

They kill EVERYTHING. A berserker cannot recognize friend from foe. They want to kill their (former) comrades as much as their enemies. That makes them bad for fighting in groups. Where they shine is desperate suicide attacks. For example you send ten berserkers ( far apart that they don't kill each other) into one flank of the enemy formation, while your ...


20

Organized shield walls can easily kill beserkers. It doesn't matter how angry you are. A spear through your heart will put you down. An organized shield wall with spear and shield can block people running at them and kill them easily. As such, in battles you need to break their shield walls first. Then, your beserkers can be used to disrupt them from within, ...


3

what about the fact berserk means out of control Therefore in your book it could just be they are to dangerous. I mean why create a super soldier that wants to kill everything including you.


0

They are sensible and courageous. Consider Homo floresiensis. These plucky little guys lived on an island in Indonesia. Note this means that, apart from ridiculous Rube Goldberg rafting-vegetation fantasies concocted in the misguided pursuit of "Occam's razor", they were capable of building boats and sailing the sea. Homo floresiensis lived on an ...


1

Your Humans have a bad case of Noble Savage-ism. To them, the Hominids are cute, dumb, and nonaggressive. So, they are more valuable as ego-boosters. They don't rise to the level of needing to be conquered, for then they'd be much closer to being equivalent to the Humans. See: Facing History: The Noble Savage and The Guardian Education: Racists Created the ...


5

The same way hunter-gathers have survived to this day, by living in places to separated from agricultural societies either by distance or conditions. where have hunter-gatherers survived today, tundra, taiga, deserts, remote mountains, dense jungle, or remote islands. Places too difficult to reach or not worth taking, with little value for an agricultural/...


4

Their agricultural magic is more valuable if they're left alone. They can produce a lot of very useful and valuable crops. Humans who live near them can make a massive profit from trading with them for their crops. Unfortunately for war mongering humans, their magics only function well so long as they have a fairly unmolested society. Empires and kingdoms ...


1

Acclimation. Your primitives can live in a region which is intolerable to "more advanced" species. Perhaps the forests in which they thrive rise from brush and wood species which have poison ivy/poison oak style defenses against most mammals. Perhaps their flower spores are extremely irritating and their rivers team with virulent filovirus making ...


8

Disease A lot of invaders have been decimated by diseases they encountered along the way. The inland might be affected by a plague to which your Hominids may have developed a natural resistance. And even if your Hominids have no natural resistance for the human colonists arriving in small numbers it might be scary. Consider the case of Attila, he defeated ...


20

Why would the human empires even bother? A pre-modern empire doesn't go and conquer territory simply because it can. Administering a conquered land is expensive. You need to clear the forest, build roads and aqueducts, defend the frontier, administer justice, ensure public peace... So that the empire does not seek to expand into a new territory if it cannot ...


6

The human body is pretty resilient and can do amazing things to resist damage. After repeated injuries is can develop thicker skin, thicker bone material, extra fluid in injured areas, such as around the brain and even scar tissue can help minimize future damage. However, this can come at a cost. the underlining tissues do not really develop a tolerance to ...


2

I am going to make an assumption, based on your technological constrains, there is no FTL of any kind, including travel, communications and emissions. When you said "And the colony ship is on the outer reaches of the system, (~4-5 billion miles? can be any reasonable distance)" may be a little too small of a number. This places it equivalent to the ...


4

Your Decision Different national traditions have put a different emphasis on headquarters at different levels, and on coordination through common doctrine vs. coordination through explicit orders. Who decides if a corporal gets decorated for bravery? The regimental commander, a division staff officer, somebody at the corps level, or somebody back in the ...


0

Localised time anti-dilation. No one wants to come back to their wife who is now 20 years older than them after what seems like 6 hours to them. If you're the feds, you can afford to keep Ω close to 1. Millionaires are happy enough with 2. In an alternative (more realistic) embodiment, localised time dilation is applied at home to wifey. Of course, your ...


0

Faster than light (or just very high power /accuracy) communications. It's all very well to send your drone ship to Alpha Centauri but now you have horribly weak radio signals with a latency of years controlling your ship. Thank God that it was a drone, if it had a crew, things would be even worse. One riff on this idea could be that the only practical way ...


3

Hostile Natives: If the enemy armies are not the only threat the army has to deal with, then these tactics may make more sense. Angry civilians mobbing your ranks will be unable to flank and charge such ranks. Werewolf charges are terrifying, but can't penetrate the defenses before being mowed down or impaled on silver-tipped bayonets. And enemy auxiliaries ...


0

The unobtainium that powers these things. Much like today you can't get to your hands on enriched uranium, even if your really really want a nuclear powered ship. In the future whatever unobtainium that powers the spaceships will be heavily restricted to the militaries of superpowers only. Everyone who got handed a spaceship will be ordered to hand them over ...


0

Marko Kloos's Palladium Wars series confronts this exact question. In this space opera series, ships do indeed have reactionless drives. And what restricts the ships' comparative power is acceleration compensation (a kind of anti-gravity) and structural design. That is, anyone can pump enough power into the drive to accelerate at 25G, but if your crew is ...


4

If we're talking "magic gambesons" it could have something to do with the defensive magic that makes them bulletproof. The spell which grants them bullet-proofness requires a certain amount of magical energy (X), but each gambeson can only have (Y) amount of energy. However the spell can be daisy-chained via close proximity. So while 1 spell-...


3

Grouping your soldiers into tight groups has tactical and psychological advantages. Arranging those groups into specific formations, given the superiority of armor, mobility and weaponry does not seem to offer any advantage. Psychologically, having armed friendlies nearby helps with morale. It supports courage and obedience to the chain of command. ...


0

In the world of 1g acceleration the 2g acceleration man is king. The military is gonna have to keep anything that lets humans withstand more gs out of civilian hands. Gene mods to make people tougher, goo pods to cushion sharp turns, cybernetics to limit trauma. This will let military and government ships endure much harsher acceleration than civilian ships. ...


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