40

It depends on how space ships operate in your universe. When they operate more like maritime ships (like they do in the Star Trek universe, for example), then "Bridge" would be appropriate. When they work more like aircraft, then "Cockpit" might be more appropriate. Which is why some space operas use "bridge" for large crafts (...


39

Hard Suit Exoskeleton The suit maintains the same air pressure as inside the ship and the powered exoskeleton restores the ease of movement. Soft flexible spacesuits would have the problem of blowing up like a balloon and the additional pressure making the limbs harder to move but a hard suit avoids these problems. Robotic Avatar By using an avatar, a ...


30

Use a mechanical counterpressure suit. These are space suits designed for a lower profile. By using mechanical rather than atmospheric pressure across most of the skin (except for the face), they eliminate the need to maintain the same pressure in the helmet and suit body. There's nothing wrong with the atmospheric mix used in the station for breathing ...


18

Realistically they're still not going to be very good Liquid breathing isn't going to help with the brain which is nothing more than a mass of jelly in a hard box. You don't need to crack a skull to give a brain injury. A Japanese dish is the Golden Egg which is basically scrambling the egg without breaking the shell. Enough G-force and you'll scramble the ...


7

You a have a shift system where you allways keep some crew members suited up and ready to go. Its a bit of a wasteful in terms of people resources (as all they could do is float around while suited up) but this would not need any new technology.


7

I'm afraid you've misunderstood quite a lot. I believe you're referring to black hole starship, as a kugelblitz refers to a particular way to make a black hole rather than anything else. Mass/density Black holes can have any mass or any density, however these are inversely connected — the lower the mass, the denser they get. The sort of black hole generally ...


5

If the location is a small enclosed space where the commanding officer (and perhaps one or two others) directly controls the vessel and all or at least a majority of vessel navigational, communication, and engine control functions without having to move from their position at the controls, it is a cockpit. Not just aircraft, but boats have them as well. If ...


5

I think the difference is whether the captain is in direct control of the ship as the pilot, which indirectly correlates to ship and crew size: Captain is the pilot with direct control = cockpit Captain giving orders instead of being directly control the ship = bridge


5

I always read about "control rooms" in old science fiction stories. I hate the term "flight deck" for some reason. Maybe because it seems too British and too areonautical for a vehicle which operates totally outside of any atmosphere. I prefer the term "cockpit" for airplanes. But much less for large scale spaceships. After ...


5

It might help some, but your pilots are not gods. When all other things are equal, or close to it, any little advantage can tilt the balance. I would think that the mind-machine interface makes a greater difference than the liquid breathing. A lot depends on your assumptions for engine technology -- you would need engines to make hundreds of m/s2 ...


4

As you say, there is not a lot of research on the effects of acceleration, and what is known is based almost entirely on subjects (pilots) who were chosen to have an unusually low risk of cardiovascular problems. The same is true for the other medical risks specifically associated with space travel (mainly due to prolonged weightlessness and isolation in ...


4

An alternative @Thorne's mention of using a drone caused me to ask some questions. I upvoted his answer, but here's an alternative. Assumption: The human being actually needs to leave the ship. Whether they just want to embrace the ultimate emptiness of space to the greatest degree or whatever the task to be done is, it can't be done by a drone of any shape ...


4

Well, this is a great question! I thought it sounded easy at first glance, but then I realised I actually had no idea...so I turned to our old friend Wikipedia. I'm sure you did this too and I am preaching to the choir, but here goes. Cockpit comes from 'cockswain', and "referred to an area in the rear of a ship where the cockswain's station was located,...


3

Probably neither. There would be much less need for a specific bridge or cockpit area when systems are automated and monitoring can be carried out from various locations. There might be a central control screen to act as a psychological reminder that this is the place where any important flight decisions are made (abort options, initiate various engine fire ...


3

Liquid breathing pilots are still biological. Embrace the machine and upload them instead. Your hypothetical liquid-breathing pilots, regardless of their modifications, are still fundamentally biological beings, with biological limitations. They can still only withstand so much g-force, they have reaction times limited by the nerve impulses in the brain, and ...


3

Basically, if you're coming from the angle of realism and practicality, it all comes to size. Small enough ships just simply do not have enough room to have a proper shielded bridge inside of them, and\or designed to perform things that might actually need a cockpit functionality (I.e. a direct unobstructed view of where you are going), like landing on the ...


3

Brig is a term used by U.S. Naval personel and derivitive military services (U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Marines) and is derrived from the word Brigantine, which was a sailing ship with two square rigged masts and abriviated as "Brig". While this was a classification of ships in the age of sail, in the early U.S. Navy these ships were frequently ...


2

Nomenclature When you say cockpit, I automatically imagine a seated position cramped amongst the machinery in a small craft/fighter, whilst when you say bridge I imagine the space where the Capitan, navigator and pilot stay on a naval vessel. That is what every average joe is going to imagine when talking about that and that's what literature and TV have ...


2

First and foremost think about your target audience and what they would like. Do keep in mind that many times media miss the "target"group and land with an untargeted group. Me, I like Bridge. Any space vehicle that is capable of carrying up to 200 people is going to be large. Not withstanding just the humans, luggage, food, water, fuel, life ...


2

You answer your own question. To be able to space walk — or hard vacuum work — at the drop of a hat, the wearers suit needs to provide the identical environment as their every day habitat. The means they need to advancement in material sciences, biology, chemistry, and applied thermodynamics to be able to maintain the proper gas mixture under varying levels ...


2

Pressurize your space ship with heliox instead of nitrogen/oxygen. Helium dissolves significantly less in the blood than nitrogen, and the decompression time necessary to get into a low-pressure suit should be practically nothing unless you're running your ship's internal pressure absurdly high. Of course, this may complicate some of the things you might ...


2

Interesting question. Let's talk about response times. Electrical signals can propagate at close (99%) the speed of light. Let's just call that an even 300,000 meters / second. It is that fast because as soon as you give a power source a path to ground, electrons are carried by current through the conductor (wire), which is at a constant conductivity. Nerve ...


2

Sticking to the negatives, long term or performance enhancing total liquid ventilation hasn't been done to know what the real effects may be. TLV is better than conventional mechanical ventilation (i.e. iron lungs and modern ventilators used in covid 19 situations) in animal studies, and partial may help babies more than adults, and may actually be worse ...


1

You are confusing being massless with being weightless. You state about the mirror They reflect the Hawking Radiation and seemingly keep the black hole in stasis This means the black would not have any acceleration, thus would have no weight in whatever gravitational field you are considering it to be placed. But being weightless doesn't make it massless. ...


1

You take one of these beautiful 60's style glass bubbles, 2 meters diameter or maybe a little bit less. Put a chair inside, strap arms and fingers and legs in some kinds of movable armrest / legrest. Or forget the legs. Why legs. Maybe there are magnets or grappers on the feet to fix the vehicle to the station? Outside you attach mechanical arms and legs to ...


1

The main reason that current spacewalkers need so much preparation time for a spacewalk is that their spacesuits operate with a low pressure pure oxygen atmosphere while their spacecraft operate in an Earth normal oxygen/nitrogen mix. Going from one to the other takes time because time must be allowed for the nitrogen to flush out of the system. The other ...


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