Hot answers tagged

4

Rings = many, many moons, much brightness. https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap061016.html In the Shadow of Saturn Credit: CICLOPS, JPL, ESA, NASA Explanation: In the shadow of Saturn, unexpected wonders appear. The robotic Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn recently drifted in giant planet's shadow for about 12 hours and looked back toward the eclipsed Sun. ...


3

Short answer: yes, they will. Long answer: event though each moon is tidally locked, each of them has a different orbit around the gas giant, thus their relative position with respect to the central star and the planet will change over time. Changing the relative position will change also the point of view and the lightened part which is visible, and this ...


3

Home Moon is far enough away from the gas giant to have its magnetosphere shield it from most radiation. Tidal heating causes it to be slightly more volcanically active than earth I'm not sure you can have all three of "24hr orbital period", "tidal heating" and "far enough away to be safe from radiation belts". I'm not even ...


2

Observers all over Home Moon will see all other satellites, not only those observers on the far side. Since Home Moon is tidally locked there will be no tidal heating; to understand why, consider a coat hanging on a hook in the wall: does Earth's gravitational force do any work on the coat? Does it warm up the coat? No work means no energy to be converted ...


2

Remember the last time you saw a sunset? This is basically what the moon sees before and after the totality of a solar eclipse. The sun is mostly obscured by the Earth, and the part which is not obscured by Earth shines through earths atmosphere. During a sunset, the light of the sun becomes orange and then red due to interactions with the atmosphere (...


2

I am busy with other stuff right now, so this is a short answer. If the other moons have a large enough angular diameter as seen from the viewing moon to appear as objects and not mere points of lights, they will certainly show phases. As the viewing moon and the viewed moons orbit around the planet, the angles between them and between each and the planet ...


1

A second answer 10-14-2021 Using a Month Based on the Synodic Period of the Two moons. I suggested that one possible basis for a month equivalent of the habitable moon would be the synodic period of an outer moon with the inner and habitable moon. I also noted that the more similar the orbital periods of the two moons were, the longer their synodic period ...


1

Yes, during a lunar eclipse the moon is actually lit by a reddish light. The reason for this color is (loosely) because the light has to pass through the atmosphere in order to reach the moon - in effect the Earth acts a bit like a piece of red glass between the Sun and Moon. Therefore, if you have a moon base, during those moments, everything will ... be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible