79

I have a few ideas: Good ol Speed limits Look this a bit lower tech than your probably aiming for, but with an average distance between galaxies of about 10 million light years, and an average distance between stars of about 5 light years. Just pick a max speed that means they'll die and turn to dust before arriving in the next galaxy. If you can do 100ly / ...


58

There are two broad reasons why the jump drives are only used on planets. The first reason is that some property which planets have but spaceships lack is required for the jump drive to work successfully. Two such properties come to mind: gravity and thermal mass. The second reason is that it is possible to move smaller objects, but due to some scaling ...


57

Jump drives are just plain huge The reason they move entire planets around instead of smaller ships is because, by the time you've put all necessary equipment for a functioning jump drive into your ship, the ship's size is edging into planetary scales. ("That's no moon... it's a space station!") Putting the jump drive onto a planet is easier and ...


52

An exact answer The position of a star in space can be specified by three coordinates: Its right ascension, $\alpha$, its declination, $\delta$, which are collectively referred to as equatorial coordinates, and its distance from Earth, $d$. It's probably easiest to calculate the distance between two stars by converting equatorial coordinates to Cartesian ...


48

I think there are several different ways this can be solved: Send professionals and risk it Honestly, just send teams of 6 trained astronauts and hope for the best. This is probably what's going to happen. I highly doubt NASA would admit that their professional astronauts would break protocol (even though I agree, there would be a decent chance of failure ...


47

You've got this the wrong way around. You're trying to deflect an entire star, which engineers refer to as very very heavy. You're doing this to save a planet, which those engineers might refer to as merely very heavy. Any technology capable of measurably changing the trajectory of an entire star would be better put towards adjusting your home planet's own ...


46

Your crew members all have Down's syndrome. Downs syndrome is an inborn chromosomal abnormality that comes with characteristic developmental and cognitive differences. One Downs syndrome stereotype is that individuals with this condition are passive, mellow and easygoing. All persons with Downs are intellectually disabled to one degree or another but 20% ...


44

If your aim is to use liquid nitrogen to mask heat, it will be just a temporary mitigation. The heat from the ship will cause the liquid nitrogen to heat up and evaporate in the vacuum of space. If you want to keep the liquid nitrogen in place, you need to cool it down and dump that heat away. But dumping the heat away is what your ship was doing already ...


40

It depends on how space ships operate in your universe. When they operate more like maritime ships (like they do in the Star Trek universe, for example), then "Bridge" would be appropriate. When they work more like aircraft, then "Cockpit" might be more appropriate. Which is why some space operas use "bridge" for large crafts (...


39

Hard Suit Exoskeleton The suit maintains the same air pressure as inside the ship and the powered exoskeleton restores the ease of movement. Soft flexible spacesuits would have the problem of blowing up like a balloon and the additional pressure making the limbs harder to move but a hard suit avoids these problems. Robotic Avatar By using an avatar, a ...


36

Totally plausible if you lose your navigation computer - space journeys aren't straight lines! As much as star-trek and the like may make us believe: Space isn't a big open 3d region where you just pick a direction and head that way and get there. If space was that simple, it would be basically impossible to come back to your point of origin unexpectedly ...


32

Depends where your ship is. If you're in, say, Earth's orbit, or anywhere inside the Main Belt, anyone who happens to detect the ship with passive sensors might wonder why an asteroid so close to the sun is so cold (its surface ought to approximate black body temperature for its distance from the star) -- and if you're in interstellar space (or near it, like ...


32

Observe the star, particularly its spin. That will tell you where the debris disk (planets) are most likely to be. The star's equator is likely to be close to the plane of the debris disk. Jump to a spot well above/below the expected debris disk. Mask out the star's light. Take a 6-hour photographic exposure (or equivalent). The lines (not dots) on the ...


30

I don't know if there is any catalogue that will give you the information you need. You will have to math it out. Think of this: there are up to 10,000 stars visible to the naked eye, so a full table with all the distances between any giver pair would have around 50,000,000 rows. It would be a really large book. So you have to math it out. The easy way is to ...


30

Use a mechanical counterpressure suit. These are space suits designed for a lower profile. By using mechanical rather than atmospheric pressure across most of the skin (except for the face), they eliminate the need to maintain the same pressure in the helmet and suit body. There's nothing wrong with the atmospheric mix used in the station for breathing ...


27

Dark Matter Propeller Engines. Your spaceships use Dark Matter in the same way propeller engines use air - they push it around so you can move your craft forward. Trying to leave a galaxy means leaving the higher density of dark matter. It would be the equivalent of trying to fly a plane where the atmosphere is too thin for proper engine function, causing it ...


24

Nitrogen isn't inherently cold. It has some properties that make it useful for refrigeration/cryonic applications: it's easily available, not very reactive, and because it stays liquid at very cold temperatures, we can pipe it around or dunk things in it. You can think of it as something that transports or stores "cold", but it doesn't make "...


24

Option A is the safest long-term orientation This is because it minimizes the surface area of the cylinder along the direction of travel. Assuming the cylinder is traveling at relativistic speeds i.e. some small % of the speed of light this will be an important consideration because the vessel will almost certainly encounter gas molecules and dust particles ...


23

Don't explain it, just refer to it Everybody in your universe already knows why it can't be done. Maybe it's the "energy barrier" (Star Trek) Or a Rogue Star intelligence prevents it (Frederick Pohl / Jack Williamson) Or perhaps it's the "Pain of Space" or the "Space Dragons" (Cordwainer Smith) Or maybe the couple ...


23

I've always been a bit sceptical about the idea that boredom might pose a serious threat to long-term space missions, because, across the world, there are millions of people who live lives that seem to me to be equivalently boring to a ten-year space voyage. A lot of people have jobs that offer them no significant time off, no significant variation, and no ...


23

Frame Challenge It's not a ship that would find a planet, it's an observatory. Keep Watching the Skies Right now, we've found 4 341 planets outside our solar system, and we've only barely sent one space ship outside of same. Even with many space ships, people wouldn't be sending ships to go find planets. Even in Star Trek, stellar cartography is mostly ...


22

Hyperspace is dangerous and/or power threshold Danger Will Robinson! There's gravel, small boulders, charged particles and pirate ships (maybe even Space Hulks!) in hyperspace. A planet with fully certified Van Allen belts and a decent atmosphere will have no trouble with the natural hazards and has the firepower to stomp aggressors flat. (Ships riding ...


20

Option A has better engine mounting, and less wear and tear while thrusting. As another answer has already pointed out A will take impacts onto a smaller surface area - that's a good thing, but there's one other thing to consider - where the engines go and how they are fired for acceleration and deceleration. Option A you can have an engine at either end. ...


19

Option B is utterly terrible in almost every regard. It's harder to build, it's less structurally sound, the gyroscopic effects the drum creates will make it into an absolute nightmare to control, and the gravity will begin to fluctuate while you are under acceleration, which will give everybody inside seasickness. The increased frontal crossection is almost ...


18

Realistically they're still not going to be very good Liquid breathing isn't going to help with the brain which is nothing more than a mass of jelly in a hard box. You don't need to crack a skull to give a brain injury. A Japanese dish is the Golden Egg which is basically scrambling the egg without breaking the shell. Enough G-force and you'll scramble the ...


17

The oldsters had all been vaccinated. The youngsters not. In the real world, I got the smallpox vaccine when I was a kid. My younger brother did not. They stopped giving it to kids in the US between the years we were born. In your world the old folks all got a vaccine that came out of use or was modified 25 yeas ago. Younger persons got a different ...


17

Their body will be converted to a multi light year long skid mark The poor soul doesnt intersect the warp bubble every molecule at once. It takes time for the body to transition that threshold out of warp, and during that time, the ship moves significant distance. Two molecules of the body which were adjacent in the warp bubble are now hundreds of km apart ...


16

YES The law of conservation of energy The law of conservation of momentum and probably be at least extension almost all other laws Contradictio in terminis: Magic per definition break physics, if it did not break physics it would be physics and not magic. Example 1: Have one wormhole situated 10 meters above ground and the other at ground level, both ...


15

Accuracy is related to mass The accuracy of the jump drive is inversely proportional to the mass. There's a limit to how accurately we can control them; and for smaller objects, this translates into a dangerously large error margin on where the object ends up. A ship could be jumped, but the risk of ending up inside a star or planet core, or exiting the jump ...


14

Each crewmember has an official weight allowance for personal gear. This could be a crucifix or rosary, a framed picture of a loved one, whatever. The allowance is big enough for a few consumables, too. Sweets, liquor, whatever. (Subject to safety regulations. No drunkenness without permission.) As consumables are consumed the crewmember can request a weight ...


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