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7

I love the concept, but don't see anything that big and made with armor that heavy (iron/steel hull as per your references to tanks and warships) being able to be held afloat with technology of the early 20th century, even in a much denser atmosphere. Using the HMS Dreadnought as my example of the early 1900s battleship, as it revolutionised battleship ...


5

Depends, how high gravity do you mean? This study's summary https://arxiv.org/abs/1808.07417 for example suggests that 3-4 g might be doable for humans to train for. As for other life forms, they too should have no problem with that level of gravity. Of course, it would require adaptation, and prepare for human collonists to become fantasy dwarves rather ...


4

You have to have air as heavy as water. If these things have an average density similar to the sea faring battle ships they look like, they could only float if the air were about as dense as water. My assumptions: These things fly like blimps, using buoyancy, not anti-gravity or jet propulsion, or helicopter blades or any other kind of active lifting ...


3

The US Navy had an intense interest in lighter than air vessels right up until the 1950's (giant blimps used as airborne radar platforms), and commissioned an all metal blimp in 1929, the ZMC-2 ZMC-2 in front of a hanger However, like all LTA craft, it works by displacement and it's relatively small size suggests that a larger envelope would rapidly reach ...


3

Spin it faster. Really fast. CoRot-7b for example is average Super-Earth at about 1.6 Earth radius (10k) and 8 Earth masses. It would be about 3G at the surface according to a gravity calculator I found. Rotation doesn't counter much gravity; the rotation the Earth counters less than a tenth of a percent of Earth's gravity at 24 hrs per rotation. However ...


3

Add some fantasy I think in order to solve this problem without changing the technology you will have to introduce some substance we don't have in our own universe (that we know of yet). I am unable to come up with any reasonable explanation that is entirely scientific, however if you introduce some new materials to make the ships lighter, assist with an ...


2

Someone once asked Randall Munroe whether a submarine could float within Jupiter's atmosphere. His response includes the passage below. TL;DR: buoyancy depends only on density, but by that time any atmosphere is dense enough to support a ship it also has a pressure high enough to crush it. Buoyancy depends on density, not pressure. There's a point in ...


2

I would like to address several problems in your question. If flat spacetime had a Kronecker delta metric instead of the usual Minkowski metric then the "invariant" spacetime interval wouldn't be invariant ( if you are still thinking of $t$ as time, otherwise it's an invariant space distance). Also while defining a spherically symmetric metric in spacetime ...


1

Typically the size of an organism doesn't increase or decrease because of a planet's gravity. The reason for the dinosaurs growing to their immense size and the large bugs that predated the dinosaurs is thought to be because of a more oxygen saturated atmosphere. Today's atmosphere is about 20% Oxygen, but when terrestrial life (mostly athropods) first ...


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