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6

Yes. There would be, because constant acceleration is equivalent to 'gravity.' Being at a velocity close to the speed of light changes nothing. Occupants of spaceships travelling close to lightspeed will experience the same acceleration.


3

Forces are vectorial, meaning they have a direction. Equal forces with opposite directions nullify each other. Many moons won't generate bigger tides, rather flimsy ones, for the most of the time, since their pull will be having different directions. If you want to have big tides, 1 moon is sufficient.


3

Yes: Consider terrestrial creatures with significantly more mass than humans as an example. This creates a situation functionally similar to a 'normal-ish' human on a super-earth. A body with enormous mass and internal pressure. For example, look at the physiology of a giraffe. In order to contain the massive blood pressure in their bodies, their skin must ...


3

As I see it you have 3 issues here: Gravity. Normally sodium circulation would occur because of a temperature/density gradient which facilitates convection to carry it through the heat-exchange cycle. In minimal gravity the circulation would be crippled without a pump, both for the core->sodium heat exchange (spinning the sodium to create a centrifugal ...


3

This is quite a difficult question to answer fully, because rocket science is hard. There are three things you need to do. Boost your rocket high enough that it leaves the atmosphere so you can enter a suitable orbit (I'll ignore boosting straight into an escape trajectory for now). Boost your rocket out quickly enough that you don't spend more time (and ...


2

There are three significant limitations that enter into this question. First, thrust to weight ratio. This determines how much fuel you can actually lift off the launch pad. If the rocket weighs more than the thrust the engines can deliver, it'll just sit there until it burns off enough propellant to be able to rise. The usual rule of thumb is that ...


1

There should be no serious problem with operating a nuclear reactor in zero gravity provided it has been specifically designed for that purpose. Such a reactor in zero or very low gravity would need a pump or more likely a series of pumps and back up pumps to ensure circulation of the sodium. In fact sodium cooled nuclear reactors have flown in space: https:...


1

What you describe is what astronauts experience in their missions: whenever they fire their rockets, they experience the inertia and feel the "weight", which they don't when they are in free fall. The problem with this concept for giving constant apparent gravity is that you need to constantly fire the rockets, and that requires fuel, which requires further ...


1

Frame challenge: you do not need satellites, use balloons instead. Current technology is fine. Costs will be steep, but not as steep as the space based solution. Have huge balloons flying around. The closer to the ground, the smaller they can be, but higher ones will present a better illusion and be less vulnerable to being seen from the side by a plane or ...


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