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12

Can the process be liquidized? I'm not a biologist, but I lean towards probably not. At least. Not actual nacre. Is "A mollusk that secretes a liquid that hardens into a solid object" plausible? Sure. There are a lot of things that are liquid and harden, many in the natural world. The issue you're going to run into is the hardening process. If the liquid ...


7

Different swallowing techniques: Strong throat muscles: Once getting food between the jaws, stick your neck up allowing gravity to throw your food into your gullet, at which point the throat muscles take action and crush the food for you. No tongue! Sublimation: I don't think this exists on Earth, but acids inside the creature's mouth turn the food into a ...


7

1/2: Shadow Biospheres Encyclopedia Britannica's article on abiogenesis claims that some scientists support the theory of multiple geneses on Earth: Some scientists have proposed that abiogenesis occurred more than once... phosphate-based life... gained an evolutionary advantage over all non-phosphate-based life (“nonstandard” life) and thereby became ...


6

The conceptual technology you are looking for is called "Star Lifting", and it uses the creation of powerful magnetic fields outside of the star to "squeeze" it and force huge masses of plasma to be ejected. At that point the people doing the "star lifting" can capture the plasma, cool it and extract whatever they are looking for from it, and store the rest ...


5

They are sending (trading? donating?) scientific information. The first is a blueprint for a fusion reactor. People are suspicious, they analyse it, they understand it, and it works. The second is the algorithm to maximize advertising revenue for your social media platform while keeping hate speech away. People look at it, they cannot quite grasp why it ...


5

Yes it is possible there are Grey Aliens, but the funny thing is that chance of it being like humans but grey is quite narrow to be almost impossible We don't know what life would really be like on other worlds as we have not detected any, so using Earth as an example is the only basis we have to formulate evolutionary theories. Life on Earth could go in ...


4

Storing the ooze maybe the simple part. Imagine everything begins when a fisherman who collected some mollusks for a meal lets some drops of the ooze fall on something like quicklime. Someone else notices that some marbles of hard material formed in the quicklime because it reacted with the ooze. Eventually they find out they can create the material by ...


3

There are several possible solutions to this if you think about it. The tongue is used to manipulate food in your mouth. It isn't 100% there to shove it down your throat. On example would be birds. Birds often have fairly fixed tongues. They don't usually go outside of the mouth and have small upwards and downwards movements. In this case, you can see ...


3

A technological virus is out of question for nowadays, unless they hack into the internet in a way that only works in Hollywood. However, if this were done in the 70's or 80's it might just work! Back then a lot of computer programs were stored in cassete tapes, the type you would use in a stereo (floppies were a thing, but hadn't dominated the market yet). ...


3

Instead of going straight to different materials, let's first look at different ways that life can manifest with the materials it already has. One way to do this is through Chirality. Chirality in chemistry is basically a description of the asymmetry of molecules, and organic molecules all seem to share a specific chirality which we call 'left handed'. We ...


2

See Stephen Baxter’s Xeelee series for an example of this in fiction. Dark matter life-forms called photino birds live in the gravity wells of normal baryonic matter stars, but novae and supernovae disrupt their habitats, so they use their technology to stop nuclear fusion in stars and prematurely turn them into white dwarfs. (In real life, there seems to be ...


2

If "the local star" isn't our Sun, I think I can help you. Actually, I think I can even if it is the Sun, but in the far future. In "The End of the Sun", two such scenarios are described. These will occur naturally during the star's lifespan, without the need for any third-party intervention, advanced technology or sorcery. You say "thousands of years", so ...


2

A non-answer that doesn't help you in worldbuilding, but is a realistic evaluation of the usefulness of 3D printers in early-human-history. How many 3D printed items does the average modern human own? Probably zero, unless he was given one by a friend or owns a printer. If current 3D printers are not used for creating common items now, similar machines ...


2

What if it didn't have to breath through its mouth? One of the main functions of the tongue is to push the food into the throat, it does this so food doesn't go into our airway and we don't choke. But if your airway wasn't in your throat, there would be no risk of choking, so something getting stuck wouldn't be a big problem. Instead of having a tongue, the ...


2

Use fingers. If dogs were to consider how humans eat, they would be puzzled. Our faces are so short. How can we bite up our food? The answer - except for drunk lady rugby players exploring alternatives, we move food to mouth using fingers. We put it in our mouths. We can poke it right in there should we choose. Take that further. Poke the food all ...


2

The Greys are based on late 19th / early 20th century predictions of what humans will look like in the distant future. The only weird bit is the color. As it turns out, there is a way to get a greyish tinge to one's skin: Argyria, what happens when one consumes a great deal of silver over time. The silver settles in the argyrian's skin, where it tarnishes. ...


2

Perhaps just sending certain data encoded into the virus RNA might be sufficient to cause mayhem. Assuming that the virus arrived in some way that made it obvious that it was of extra terrestrial origin and that Terrestrial scientists were then asked to study it and discover its contents reading the code could potentially be very disruptive. Step one would ...


1

a virus (technological or psychological), how could that signal then infect our technology and then be received by humans? The realistic answer is that it couldn't. It is hard enough to communicate, let alone abuse the communication as in, say, The Astronaut's Wife. In A for Andromeda, thanks to their extensive knowledge, the aliens send several ...


1

Concerning the grey-ness I'd say that this might an adaptive colour which makes them less identfiable by predators, i.e. it is more about camouflage.


1

Icing on a cake is definitely a form of 3d printing/additive manufacturing...... You could just do what we now do with icing on a cake, assuming the liquid that hardens upon contact with air/water exists (a lot of things in nature does this-- hot plastics for one, but natural resins and cements are among the materials that are available to bronze-age ...


1

This isn't exactly the answer you asked for, but I think it may work well for your purposes. You said in a comment that your species is on open, rolling grassland/prairie-like biomes, so there's lots of walking to do. I think it's problematic to envision that this species evolved in these prairies because, evolution-wise, wide open spaces heavily reward ...


1

The Photino Birds from the Xeelee sequence. Creatures made of dark matter that feed by orbiting through stable gravity fields. They're uneffected by heat or essentially any other normal physical processes. Because they like stable gravity wells, white dwarfs are their ideal environment. They REALLY don't like black holes or neutron stars. They "infect" a ...


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