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17

Because 'Oil Rigs' are just the beginning Wikipedia's Asteroid Mining article states that in the next 50 to 60 years, we will run out of phosphorus, antimony, zinc, tin, lead, indium, silver, gold, and copper. A lot of that is available in various asteroids in space, so that's where we'll begin. And sure, asteroid mining will start as a thoroughly unpleasant ...


13

Star Lifting Gone Wrong There are very few natural phenomena that are big enough to wipe out a solar system, but also small enough to not kill everyone just a few light weeks away. The only real candidate for this would probably be a nova (not to be confused with a supernova). Smaller novas can cause a star to flare up its energy output somewhere in the ...


12

TL;DR: useful but slow. Probably no good for human colonisation of space. If you can scale it up though, it might be interesting. Is it possible to put the spaceship into an orbit so that it can arrive at the orbit of the other planet at the right time, Yes. I won't bother trying to work out the maths here, but it isn't super difficult. You can basically ...


12

Gamma Ray Burst A nearby GRB manages to dead-center the solar system with one of its polar jets. This jet of energy contains the energy output of a typical star's entire 10-billion-year lifespan, focused along two polar jets. The Jets are quite directional, as narrow as just 2 degrees wide. Each contains something like 10e44 Joule, enough to vaporize a ...


10

DISCLAIMER: The only reason I didn't VTC this question as 100% opinion based is because I believe so fervently that my answer is the only realistic answer. I'm sure others will disagree with me... but you'll need to prove me wrong with more than casual logic. Realistically there will be no space battles Space [...] is big. Really big. You just won't believe ...


9

Niven's The Integral Trees has exactly this premise. It has a somewhat implausibly benign gas ring around a star, pulled out of the atmosphere of a convenient gas giant that's too close to its parent star to fully retain its atmosphere. Could such an environment really exist? Almost certainly not. A major part of the problem is that when you're close ...


8

A FEW THOUGHTS: I can think of a few reasons people would want to move into space if they had the resources to do it. ESCAPING THE RIFF-RAFF: Rich folks who want to lord it over mere normal people can't get more OVER than moving to space. No one is going to sneak up on your house to rob you when the world can watch the thief sneak up on you. Rioting ...


8

When you get to the scale of "wiping out solar systems" there aren't many phenomena capable of producing power on the insane levels we're talking about. The most likely option is to have a rogue black hole hurtle through the system and rip it apart. Detecting a rogue black hole might be incredibly difficult, as the only thing you can see is the ...


6

Mostly yes There are 3 crew dynamics that will work for a long term multiple generation mission like this: Military. High discipline and chain of command. Children's education works towards military recruitment in late teens. People will be following orders their entire life with clear disciplinary consequences for breaking them. Refusal to be on birth ...


6

Railways are the ships of the land. They are the most efficient form of land transport over long distances, and the only form of transport for heavy cargo. You can't efficiently transport heavy cargo by truck 500km, let alone 2000km. It's still pretty much the only solution to haul heavy cargo like building materials and resources by land. Roads and overland ...


5

The rocket equation works just fine whether for a rocket leaving a gravity well, or already in deep space. Things are easier in space, things like gravity drag are much less problematic and aerodynamic drag is nonexistent. Just use the equations you've already found and you'll get what you need. Say we used a similar but improved engine (in the year 2060) ...


5

Yes-ish This will get you from point A to point B. Navigation will require timing things right- aim for where the planet will be (or you will gain the correct velocity to intercept that planet). The rest is just geometry of your system. This system alone does not guarantee that you will have the proper speed for orbit around a target body. It depends on the ...


5

There are a bunch of problems here. Firstly, you're not having realistic space battles, on account of energy shields. Secondly, you haven't said anything about where battles might be fought, or why. Low planetary orbit will be dramatically different from interplanetary space, for example. Thirdly, you haven't constrained your drive technology. Do your ships ...


5

Strangelet Strangelets are fragments of matter made of strange matter. I.E. matter composed by roughly equal numbers of up, down and strange quarks. So, the alien civilization is running an experiment for generating a high-density fuel by exploring the energetic possibilities of quark-gluon plasma. The strange* experiment needs copious amount of power, so ...


4

This sounds more like a hyperspace drive than a warp drive As others have pointed out, the idea of just "going forward in a straight line, at constant velocity" is in obvious conflict with General Relativity, which holds that this is in fact what all planets (and spacecraft, when not actively applying thrust) are already doing. The reason it does ...


4

Laser Broom If you had a really big system of lasers zapping particles semi-indiscriminately, you could perturb the orbits of these particles enough to decay the orbits. You wouldn't need to be really accurate, because the particles are small and wouldn't take much to nudge them. the concept is designed for slightly bigger particles (centimeter sized) so it ...


4

Fusion propulsion versus throwing nuclear bombs out the back Here are two technologies that could give you your desired results that have been heavily studied by serious scientists. High efficiency: fusion-driven rockets A fusion rocket would convert propellent to power in a linear and predictable way. It would also be gentle on the structure of the rocket. ...


4

Frame challenge - Distances Unrealistic Barring political conflict that would make trade unlikely, even on Earth, colonies tended to be clustered for mutual support. If you need space, a hundred km is more than enough. Two thousand km (on average! For a century!) is totally unreasonable. Short-Haul Trucking If we reduce the distance between the colonies, ...


4

but subsequent generations did not choose to be stuck on a spaceship. For all practical purpose, subsequent generations ties with Earth's are weaker than that with the spaceship. They derive their memories, culture and norms growing up with other highly trained staff of the spaceships, which helps perpetuate the required values within the newer set. Also, ...


4

What you describe is an unstable system. For a body A to orbit another body B, A has to be within the sphere of gravitation influence of B, called Hill sphere. In your case A is in the Hill sphere of B, and A' is in the Hill sphere of B'. If A and A' get close enough to share atmosphere, it means that they will also be at the borders of both Hill spheres. In ...


3

Sorry to be so blunt, but as this was a concept I once considered heavily, you really aren't understanding the complexity or magnitude of the problems of interstellar spaceflight at all. Nothing about this concept works from an actual realism standpoint. Even well thought out generation ship designs are extremely unlikely to ever happen. To start with, your ...


3

Looks mostly OK, but a couple of things jump out at me. atmospheric pressure is slightly higher. and greenhouse fx adds 30-50 due to Rakuen’s thick CO2 majority atmos are a problematic combination. Remember that nitrogen is cosmically common... it is the 7th most common element in space according to spectroscopic analysis (cos it is easy to make; just ...


3

I am also trying to figure out plausibility for planets in the Alpha Centauri system for a sci fi game design... I'll share some of my initial research. One thing about the system is how binary stars interact. Centauri actually has 3 stars, but only A and B happen to come quite close to each other. This causes major disruptions to all the orbiting bodies ...


3

Either A) the debris is so dense that you can laser-broom it out of orbit or B) it is sufficiently sparse that you can work on cladding your spacecraft in suitable protective layers and you'll be OK. If the debris is so small, multilayer thin Whipple shields seems like they should be more than adequate. Remember that everyone hoos and hahs about the velocity ...


3

Option 1: It becomes cheaper to build luxury space habitats than luxury apartments in New York City You want it to make economic sense to build space habitats and for people to get in them, so the first option is that it somehow becomes cheaper to build space habitats than expensive apartments in an expensive city. This is notionally possible because ...


3

The closest thing to this in real life would probably be a brown dwarf. They're not technically stars (they're classified as substellar objects, something between a large planet and a small star) but early in their lives they do fuse hydrogen (deuterium mostly) and some of the largest fuse Lithium. Pros: They emit light mostly in the infrared spectrum, ...


3

If the "red ritual" is an annual ritual associated with a festivity it could a festivity associated with the reproductive cycle of a red colored animal that requires the mass migration of the animals to one side of the moon. Something similar to the migration of red crabs on Christmas Island, in the Indian Ocean. Alternatively the moon could be ...


2

It will turn into a ring system within a few decades. Very few of these particles is static above a fixed point on earth (those few in geostationary orbit above fixed points on the equator) - every other particle is relative to the surface travelling in a roughly sinosiodal pattern that crosses the equator rapidly, with the exact period and phase a property ...


2

My initial reaction was similar to the frame challenge from Zeiss Ikon. However, this perhaps instead gives a suitable set of pseudo-science explanations for the functioning of the drive... The number of possible reference frames are as vast as the universe itself - a reference frame in which you have constant linear velocity relative to the immediate ...


2

Be sure to call the graveyard -- Einstein will be turning over, and they may need some precautions against the resulting earth tremors. FRAME CHALLENGE Your drive violates General Relativity. It violates various conservation laws as well, but the big one, here, is that for this drive to work, there is an assumption of a preferred frame of reference. ...


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