11

Better than that; there's a game that will do it. Steam has a game called Universe Sandbox where you can line up different planets, stars, et al with different masses and trajectories. I've never tried it but as I understand it the game is capable of simulating the orbits of planets, stars and the like in a way that you can graphically see the results. In ...


7

The arrangement you wish does not seem feasible. If by "dim" star you mean a star that is dimmer than our sun, you are probably thinking of a red dwarf. Such stars are thought to be far from habitable, because: The habitable zone around them requires a tidal lock; They are usually flare stars, which means the star facing side of planets in the habitable is ...


3

Our asteroid belt is so thin that we send spacecraft through it withiut fear of a collision. It won't overshadow anything. An orbital arrangement where a planet is eclipsed for a quarter of its orbit is very unlikely. I can think of two situations in which it can work: If your planet is orbiting a relatively dark body, such as a black hole or a pulsar, and ...


2

The way I would do it is have your moon orbiting a gas giant which itself is in a P-type orbit in a binary star system. Your gas giant orbits a small, dim star which is a binary companion with a much larger, much brighter star. The primary energy source for your moon is the more distant of the two. The shadow period would occur when the bright companion is ...


2

SHORT ANSWER: It is impossible to have a situation exactly as you describe. So it may be necessary for you to modify the mass, density, and diameter of the body that your Earth like moon orbits. You may need to get someone to do the calculations for you. LONG ANSWER: There have been a lot of questions on this site about hypothetical habitable Earth-sized ...


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