17

I think that because of how orbital mechanis work, a planet with an aphelion inside the habitable zone and a perihelion too close to the sun would be better for life. A planet spends a lot more time near its aphelion than near its perihelion. Thus this planet would have moderate weather most of time and scorching weather during a short "season", instead of a ...


13

On such a planet life would probably evolve in different ways than on our planet, and complex life could be different from what we consider as "plants" and "animals". There would be a huge evolutionary pressure for a much more efficient hibernation than we have in real life, or if the conditions are even more extreme, then life could thrive while in the ...


7

Some types of life would be possible. Considered a highly elliptical orbit where the closest approach is inside the habitable zone, this planet will then spend nearly all of the time outside the habitable zone and warm up only for brief periods. Now add geothermal springs that maintain life-friendly temperatures year round. Plant life that becomes dormant ...


6

It would be possible for life to exist on a planet in a highly elliptical orbit. If the planet was of sufficient mass and had a sufficiently massive heat generating core like the Earth then liquid water could remain a liquid deep under a frozen ocean for thousands of years and life could evolve and live near to oceanic vents. So a very eccentric orbit ...


5

Although the orbit of Earth may be affected, it's not only its orbit that we have to worry about. Jupiter's location creates various points where asteroids collect naturally - as is evidenced by the following diagram: Trojan, Hildas and Greek asteroid groups are currently in a fairly stable situation - swapping the massive Jupiter with Mars may cause ...


5

It's highly unlikely. To orbit a body with a close orbit you need a very specific velocity vector, anything different will either make you hit the body or skip past it. Since you mention that the planet has left the previous system, it will likely have a very high velocity, else it would have been remained bound. Since space is practically empty and the ...


4

Tidal recession is produced by the tidal bulge in the primary due to the mass of the moon(s). Our moon is huge by comparison to the Earth, so even though it's also incredibly far out compared to other large moons (and the sizes and masses of their primaries), it produces a good sized tidal bulge in the Earth, which (because the Earth isn't tide-locked to ...


4

As far as I can tell, your math is correct. One item of significance is that the counterweight at the end of your tether is generally going to be quite a bit further out than Europastationary orbit, probably by at least a third. This is because you want your transfer station to be right at the stationary point, but you want the center of mass of the entire ...


3

If we focus on stellar radiation issue only, then the answer is "very close". Two things are at play here - distance to Lagrangian point L2 and size of planetary shadow cone. Depending on our play with system parameters, the L2 moon can be either fully or partially in planetary Umbra, or in the Antumbra. Unless the moon in completely inside the umbra, we ...


3

Jupiter would appear as a much larger object in the sky. Probably as a small bright disc with visible bands of clouds. The Earth might suffer some very slight orbital perturbations. The eccentricity of the Earth’s orbit changes slightly over a time period of 100,000 years, the orbit ranges from being a nearly perfect circle to being an oval and back to a ...


2

My main concern is that the synchronous point and counterweight (which you haven't considered, but will be even further out) of your elevator cable is not going to be within Europa's Hill sphere or its gravitational Sphere of Influence. That means it will be orbiting Jupiter, and anything that orbits Jupiter further away than Europa does (or closer, for that ...


2

I'd say that Tidal Recession is one of the LEAST of the effects moving the moons around. Mars sized is a very big moon, even for a super Earth. It would be big for a gas giant. None of our planets have moons anywhere close to that size. With only 1 mars-moon, the super earth would essentially be in a binary system. Adding more moons would likely be ...


2

Tidal Recession is only one of a number of factors in play here, and as Zeiss Ikon pointed out, it's going to be considerably LESS of a factor in your system than it is in ours because your moons are smaller relative to the primary. If you REALLY want stability though, you want to have a look at orbital resonance. If you set your moons up such that they ...


2

You are looking for the elliptical orbit equations. Specifically, if your wormhole spits earth out at velocity $v$ and radius $r$ away from any gravitationally-massive body of mass $M$ : $v = \sqrt{\mu ({2 \over r} - {1 \over a})}$ Where $\mu = GM$ and $G$ = $6.67 \times 10^{-11} {m^3 \over kg*s^2}$ and $a$ is the semi-major axis (or radius at apogee) ...


1

You mentioned that you wanted the Sun to become some sort of black hole or wormhole that transports the Earth into a different Solar system. Previous answers have talked about how unlikely a random exit into another Solar system. But what if the exit wasn't random because someone else caused the wormhole to form in the first place? Allow me to introduce ...


1

An eliptical orbit is a very highly eccentric orbit. A planet in such like orbit sometimes stay very near to its parent star, and sometimes very far. Possibility of existing life or supporting life is very hard in such condition. Before, scientists assumed that the more elliptical a planet’s orbit is, the higher the planet’s average temperature will be ...


1

Here on Earth we have the wood frog, an amphibian that has evolved to be able to survive an Arctic winter, frozen into immobility and complete or almost-complete metabolic stasis. As for how life gets started on such a world: unless it has a completely alien biochemistry, it needs a place where liquid water exists for a very long time. That somewhere might ...


1

The answer to this question lies in chemistry and energy. An orbit can be highly elliptical and still remain (mostly) within the habitable zone - In our own solar system the habitable zone extends from near the edge of Venus' orbit out to the inner edge of Mars' orbit. If the nature (mass, atmospheric composition, geological processes, magnetosphere etc) of ...


1

Life as we know it is possible in a quite narrow range of parameters, which can be basically limited to those allowing for liquid water to exist. As such, as long the orbit swipes within the boundaries of the so called habitable zone, defined as the range of distances from the main star where liquid water can exist, the planet could host life. Too close to ...


1

One could postulate the recent capture of a Kuiper Belt object that got turned into a long period comet, maybe a capture via recent collision with a previously resident moon. With a large reservoir of ice and new exposure to sunlight one might get enough assymetric jetting to alter the object's trajectory significantly from purely orbital motion. This gets ...


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