42

Why We Would Hunt Them Humans never tolerate a threat against our most vulnerable population. Throughout human history we have attempted to exterminate many dangerous animals simply because they are dangerous. Wolves, snakes, bears, etc. While these animals are dangerous to hunt, it is far more dangerous to allow them to freely cohabitate with us and risk ...


20

Slapping aside a inbound projectile usually takes more energy than it took to accelerate it If you try to slap aside a projectile once it gets too close to your ship, it means you need to slap it aside at relativistic speeds to make it miss. So if you have a 100m ship and you try to slap aside a projectile that is 100m away, you have to push it just as hard ...


19

Jump jewel. https://medium.com/here-there-be-monsters/the-monster-with-a-jewel-in-its-head-efae13f86ede https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guivre Guivres are also well known as vouivres, and the terms have become synonymous. For example, in The Drac: French Tales of Dragons and Demons, the vouivre is depicted as a female creature with dazzling, green scales ...


12

No. Because that would require perfection of efficiency. Not just ridiculously good efficiency, but perfection, which nudges right up there with perpetual motion machines. However, you can get very, very close, thereby making the apparent heat signature of your ship tiny. If you know where the observer(s) are, you can shield for that direction(s) only. You ...


11

Energy budgets Paragravity is scifi but you can easily calculate energy budgets. Let us say a 5 kg bowling ball is incoming at 0.95 c. It has 225 petajoules of energy. To bring it to a halt, your deflectors need to expend that much energy and that is regardless of how they work. You have specified that the paragravity deflectors require energy. In your ...


11

Where is the pride of the hunter if not in the size and difficulty of the prey? Have you ever heard anybody bragging about of challenging was to hunt a sparrow or a mouse? No, you ear stories about hunting a lion, a hippo, a grizzly, a moose, a whale, all sort of big animals which don't give up their life easily. The way you describe the creature it looks ...


9

Why humans should kill this space creature Because They can detect ships heat from 10k km and they are very aggressive (no one know why). They attacks ships crushing theirs bodies against and shaping theirs bodies in ways they can pierce the hull or detach pieces of the ship. I don't know about you, but if I had a load of spice jeopardized because of some ...


9

It's hypothetically possible to cool the exterior of your vessel to the ambient temperature (cosmic background + interplanetary medium) and project the waste thermal energy away from the regions of space you want to avoid detection in. However, in doing so you heat the interplanetary medium "behind" you, which could be detectable everywhere if it's ...


9

The hole was first. The sunlight second. The ship was damaged. Maybe it was in battle. Maybe something hit it. Something tore The Rent, opening the ship to space. It was a long time ago. It was eventually patched, with clear plastic because that is what they had. A side effect of the patch is that the light of the stars came through. People started ...


8

Landing pods for colonisation of the planet When arriving to new worlds you want to safely move population to and from the planet to start colonisation. The AI probably thought about this. Part of the ships can detatch, allowing instant solar powered habitats to land on the surface. After landing, (part of) the outer shell will remove itself/be available as ...


6

The one problem I can see with this scheme is it's very critical. I mean: to have a significant time contraction effect you need to get very near to speed of light (effect is highly non-linear); this means a very small deviation in the projected path can result in severe desynchronization with little or no way to keep synch because of rapidly increasing ...


6

Fire a paragravity generator The problem is that there are many gravity wells that attract and repel, allowing things that are going at respectable speeds of C to be knocked out of the way. Space it big, so likely the objects fired will not hit, even if the change in direction is small. It's like hitting a single straw with a magnetic needle over a kilometer ...


6

Because they store energy When they die, they leave an organ with remaining stored energy. This presents a huge opportunity. Possibly the organ can be used as a super battery. We see the creature use it to great extend. It discharges great amounts of energy if needed. Just look at the light jump. Possibly it can store rapidly as well, as it stops after a ...


5

Well, you mentioned they both move relatively fast (though that should probably change to acceleration, but whatever.) and cause a serious disturbance when they jump. That frankly sounds like they could be a rather serious threat as a pest, disrupting shipping lanes and randomly destroying ships. If there were to be a significant infestation of these, that ...


5

The really good ship defense against those weapons would be really fast really random moving. But that isn't even an issue, as there wouldn't be any ship battles using this technology, or there wouldn't be any civilizations. This is M.A.D. scenario. When someone's flotilla defeat is assured, they'll scatter and accelerate several dozen moons at their leisure ...


5

In terms of heat, the cannon will leave less heat in the ship, as the extreme greater part of the heat will leave with the combustion gasses of the propellant. The only heat that remains is the tiny amount that transferred from the propellant to the mechanism (breech, barrel) of the cannon in the very brief fraction of a moment that it is actually firing. By ...


5

Let's assume, for convenience, that the diameter of the laser is about the diameter of the target ship. If ships of any type can perform evasive maneuvers at, say, 2000 gravities, then the distance at which a weapon can reasonably reliably hit is the distance at which the travel time of the weapon to the target ship is less than than the time it takes for ...


4

As a ship, and as a station, the structure almost certainly rotated about its axis to provide gravity on the "out" floor. Now that are landed, in a gravity field. They are resting on what used to be the rear of the ship, so the customary floors now form the outer walls of the ship! Obviously in the process of altering the interior layout of the ...


4

You can't see out when it's active. David Weber's Honor Harrington series touched on this a bit with grav wedges: if you tried to look through a grav wedge, it was basically impossible to get any kind of targeting information because any sensor readings were so distorted they were useless. It was handwaved that the defender could see through it via knowing ...


3

I really like the way this subject is treated in Jack Campbell "The Lost Fleet" series, So to make it short, you do have force fields and missiles you can accelerate to relativistivistic speed (+ separate wormhole technology for changing star system), but essentially your ships are cruising at around .1 c and engage in fractions of a second since ...


3

Para-Gravitic Jamming/disruption It turns out that if you overlap paragravitic fields without 'aligning' them first, strange things can happen and, worst case, a destructive gravitic resonance can build up. The more paragravitic projectors you have, the more complex the potential field interplay is and the more computational power you need to keep the ...


3

The way to defeat point defenses is to throw more at them than they can handle. Against shields, the attacker is in the advantage. A shield has only a very short distance in which to change an incoming objects trajectory, while the attacker can accellerate its missiles for a long time. To red shift lasers, you need just as much energy as the laser looses. So ...


3

Also have to say no. At the end of the day the amount of heat produced by an object correlates to the amount of 'work' that object can do. And by work I mean any useful form of output. So yes, while you could easily place an object in space that produced little or no heat it would by also by default be incapable of doing anything particularly useful. About ...


3

This was originally a comment but I now think it may also provide an answer, so here it is... The only way I can see how to blueshift a laser by a point-source gravity field is by shooting the laser, and then accelerating the point-source in front of the laser beam along its journey. The laser constantly "falls" into the gravity well and blueshifts,...


3

The ship had windows before it was a sleeper ship. The ship could have been built from an existing blueprint, the ai could have determined that it would be more cost effective to fab the extra parts than to resimulate the entire structure with a altered design. Alternatively, the ship could be built using repurposed space station parts, many of which already ...


3

One idea for why humans would hunt any spacefaring life is that lifeform containing a substance that remains a liquid in a vacuum. Such a substance would literally be worth orders of magnitude more than its mass in gold to a spacefaring civilization.


3

Good answers already, but here's one more: For science! (and money) See, the disintegrating corpse is an ongoing mystery with nobody having even the faintest idea how that might work. What exotic matter is it even made of that it hardly leaves any trace? Many scientists (and governments funding them) would reeeeeally like to know the secret. And they're ...


2

It Broke Apart on Landing A gargantuan ship that was never intended to land is forced the land. This is going to cause serious problems. Realistically, these are the kinds of problems that don't leave survivors - but if you're handwaving the landing away, implying that there was damage probably improves the believablity. Preparation and Repairs You can have ...


2

Yes, it is possible One of critical points with that situation I did come by is - conservation of impulse. It does not have immediate effect on them, but considering that they are in slow time, slower their common time is faster they move to the point when they observe that or can't sustain that anymore(if they are not careful). (They can move to a black ...


2

I see two main issues. One is the observations. As you fly towards the target at a velocity close to speed of light, all the emitted light will be severely blueshifted. Per my calculation moving at 99.99% speed of light (299,762.4788km/h) should give you a time dilatation factor of about 70 (70ly journey feels like a 1year) which I think would be a bare ...


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