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50

You have two choices here. Use mechanisms like wormholes that provide a "shortcut" through space. Wormholes, or wormhole-bearing things are sent out in a screen ahead of you, and can watch the enemy ship and relay signals back to you through the wormhole, thus avoiding the lightspeed lag. This does not need to violate causality or require FTL travel or ...


28

Based on the information you provided, I will assume that the beam is straight (so it travels along the straight line connecting the two ships in three-dimensional space) and unguided (so once fired, its vector cannot change, even if the ship of origin moves out of position) If those facts are true, and you know your enemy has this weapon, there are actions ...


12

Something else happened that day and nobody was looking there Years ago, there was an important earthquake in Indonesia (of magnitude 6,5). About 10 confirmed deaths and thousands of houses, schools and buildings destroyed. It was one of the ten stronger earthquakes that year. Yet no media covered it. Why? It happened on september 11, 2001 (1). A lot of ...


9

This is fairly easy to dodge or avoid. Ship A fires a deathbeam on Ship B. Let's assume the best-case scenario for Ship A: Weapon takes 0 seconds to warm up or recharge. Fired deathbeam targeting is sufficiently precise, with negligible error at the target range. If the beam is desired to hit an arbitrary point in space, that hopefully contains a ship, ...


7

Cubes are not better than spheres for increased capacity So this sounds weird - but you don't actually get more space from a cube. That's because you need to consider the materials making up the object in question. If you're objective is the maximum amount of storage space, then note that a sphere has a greater storage capacity from a relative standpoint ...


7

Earth is still mostly an empty planet. Wast stretches of ocean and entire continents like Antarctica have virtually no observers. If spaceship appeared over an unpopulated area and descended to the surface without crossing over any populated area, its appearance and demise would be unnoticed. However, if it would be flying through Earth atmosphere without ...


6

Ship A is about to pump out an incredible amount of energy in the form of it's death beam. It first needs to generate that energy, unless it can do so instantaneously which needs much bigger handwavium than the actual death beam. So Ship A brings extra reactors & capacitors on line, and as they start to produce and pool energy, some of that extra ...


5

How can Ship B, detect the incoming deathbeam, to dodge it in time It doesn't have to. Before Ship A can shoot at Ship B, it must at least be aware of Ship B's presence. And that's not all it needs to know. At 1 AU, even the slightest error in aiming could make Ship A's shot miss by hundreds of kilometers. Therefore, Ship A requires extremely precise ...


5

This is the ISS And this is the Voyager2 As you can see, their shape it's all but aerodynamics. Why? The only moment when they will have to worry about drag will be when they will reenter, being end of life. For the Voyager it will mean that it has encountered another planet with an atmosphere, YAIII, while for the ISS it will be in few years. Thus, we ...


4

Random Walk Avoidance The beam moves at the speed of light and nothing moves faster (without handwavium). There is no way to dodge because there is no way to detect the firing before it hits you. Others talk about using quantum entanglement but physicists theorize that it also moves at the speed of light so doesn't bypass the speed of light limits. What ...


3

Your first point is great. Spacecraft that are laid out as if there's a "down" that's perpendicular to the direction of thrust are almost always a stupid design and a holdover from depictions of spacecraft as essentially just aircraft or naval ships. So yes, laying the ship out as a stack of consecutive floors, sort of like a skyscraper, is objectively the ...


3

Magnetic matertials like iron and MuMetal(tm) can divert the magnetic field by providing an easier path for the field lines but some small amount will leak through. After some field strength the material will saturate and the excess will be unaffected by the shield. Superconductors are absolutely impervious to magnetic fields, but if the field is too ...


3

There are many forms of magnetic shielding that can be placed near/around the magnetic application, or as a spacesuit. Technology around faraday cages is highly developed and frequently used in regards to strong magnetic applications (such as MRI rooms). In fact, faraday cages are frequently used by doomsday preps and military applications to protect ...


3

You avoid getting creamed by the death laser by giving the guy who has the death laser something more important to worry about. Fire off some homing missiles that can detect the enemy and chase him, following a randomized path so that they're harder to hit.


3

I think your math may have seemed overly daunting because you need to consider that you are spreading the force out across your 25 million cm^2 surface area. To expand on Failus's answer: The most dangerous speed will be about 0.6c. At this speed, your hull is impacting about 18 billion atoms = 3.29e-17 kg of of hydrogen/s /cm^2 At 0.6c you are looking ...


3

It is possible that more energetic wavelengths of light are slightly slower. The speed of light in a medium of course depends on wavelength. In a vacuum light is supposed to move at the same rate regardless of wavelength. But there is a theory that space itself is a medium of sorts, which slows photons in proportion to their energy. https://www.ucdavis....


3

The true answer will depend on the mechanics of firing the deathbeam: How long does it take to fire the weapon? How precisely does it require to be targeted? How does the beam work (Does it physically destroy the entire target through e.g. heating target material, neutron beam that will destroy life forms but not the structure of the ship)? What I'm asking ...


3

They will see the missiles coming no matter what. Your giant laser ships have a giant laser that they are not doing very much with. They have a lot of empty space. They can power the laser down, broaden the beam and swing it around and around, lighting up the emptiness with the laser. As the beam scatters with distance, it will remain effective at ...


2

There's no comparison... if you had your laserstar mount a whole bunch of lasers, a few really, really big, and the rest relatively small, the small lasers could act as point defence. The point defence lasers could kill any missile before it could reach effective detonation range, yet a powerful laser can be lethal at a range of several light seconds with ...


2

So, I'm a bit late to this one, but seeing as the question popped up as being related to some other ones I've looked at lately, and the accepted answer is wrong, I thought I may as well chime in. TL;DR: could the radiation hitting the unshielded side cause structural damage and/or harm the passangers? No structural damage, but it will kill everyone on ...


2

Whilst your assertion that stealth may be possible in space is reasonable (and the links you've provided give reasonable arguments in its favour), it does not play well with this second assertion: According to my research a will be several G's or even several tens of G's and d will be in the hundreds or thousands of kilometers, resulting in delta-v ...


2

Almost everything in your spaceship can be specifically designed to handle your temperature increase without any noticeable side effects. It’s just a matter of engineering it properly. Electronics can simply use a different conductor, such as metal impregnated ceramics. It’s a challenge, but doable. The areas you really need to be concerned about are ...


2

The mother giving the explanation of the FTL travel is either not a scientist or even if she was her explanation isn't intended to be fully scientific. Certain parts of it can be taken with a grain of salt, or even plain discounted and ignored. The key concept is the continuous process of "digging holes" in space (forget dark matter; it sounds wrong, though ...


2

Happily, many of those magnetic fields are associated with environments that are so intrinsically hostile to everything... not just life, but even dumb matter, that really nothing other than specialised (and replaceable!) materials should be out there anyway. Active coilguns? You're presumably in a battle, which means you're also currently doing a meaty ...


2

(editted for brevity, if you can believe that. the edit history retains some worked analysis of the rocket performance and a comparison to the Frisbee antimatter starship design) TL;DR: It will look a little more like this than like a skyscraper: (Note the presence of heat rejection, the glowing red bits around the rockets, debris shielding, the shiny ...


2

Yes - it would be a skyscraper, and you need a way to withstand those pesky interstellar dust particles, and radiate away heat Regardless of your drive and your power source, constant 1g acceleration would slowly increase the speed of your ship such that even after just a half a lightyear any dust particles would hit your ship with enormous force, and let ...


2

I think, you are not getting it right. It's better to look at situation as spaceship is staying in place and hydrogen is coming for it at relativistic speed. From this point of view your ship practicaly under bombardment by proton beams, like from particle accelerator. 0,9c is not that big number - it's only GeVs. We do not need extreamly large ...


1

Here is another answer, since some have objected to my first answer. The firing officer on Ship A probably wouldn't fire the deathbeam unless absolutely certain that it will strike Ship B and destroy it. The OP says that the deathbeam will destroy Ship B if it hits Ship B, even if fired at a distance of one Astronomical Unit, (1 AU). That is a very ...


1

Advanced AI-based Prediction The best way to avoid something traveling at the speed of light is to "see" it before it arrives. While it isn't technically possible to receive information faster than the speed of light, powerful & highly accurate prediction is just as good. Since we're dealing with advanced tech here, it's obvious to suppose that AI is ...


1

1 AU is probably too far to hit a target So the basic idea is that you have distance/c time between the point the enemy fires and you get hit. What more, you have 2*distance/c time between the time the enemy saw where you where and the point where the beam passes your location. If you are willing to spend x m/s^2 of acceleration to "dodge" the beam, and ...


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