Hot answers tagged

59

The mind and body are less separate than most people seem to think. Changes to body chemistry can greatly change how, and even what, we think: Alcohol is well-known for its disinhibiting effects and also for changing one's perception of what makes an attractive potential partner ("beer goggles"). I have type 1 diabetes and occasionally become significantly ...


45

Sagas and epics were long history lessons memorized easily by using rhyme, rhythm and repetition of structures, so your sages could use the same techniques. Avicenna (980-1037) already wrote about the capacity of memories to be linked to smells and tastes (turns out, he was right). Maybe your Ròda chew on something while memorizing, something rich in ...


27

a machine that perfectly maps out the way in which neurons fire in Patient A regarding a certain memory, and then to stimulate an identical firing of neurons in Patient B, so as to allow them to live that memory or even believe it to be theirs? This can only work if the wiring of the neurons in our brain is standardized and homogeneous like the circuitry in ...


25

Actually I don't think that there is a lot of change of mind involved. Just look at your points: "Humans are cattle, vampires are the master race." That is something we already do. (Or most of us do) We think that our species is best and that we have the right to use inferior species to our liking. We breed and eat all kind of animals without having a bad ...


25

Human spatial memory is phenomenally good. Our ability to remember facts and figures sucks, but places and where things are and anything particularly out of place and interesting we can commit to memory quickly and remember for a long time. Check out Ed Cooks book "Remember Remember" for some fun examples. I read the first chapter a year ago and I still ...


24

Survivor Bias All vampires who refused their change, and fought against drinking blood, died. Early. As a result, there is a strong survivor bias here: only those vampires who adapted to drink blood are known to society, no matter how small a minority they represent. Alternatives to killing It's highly unlikely that a new vampire will immediately kill ...


18

Also, I was thinking about problems, like he/she buys something, and the seller would forget about it, so he/she needs to make sure no one thinks it's stealing Actually, I was thinking that this could be a great way TO steal things. A fantastic advantage...Steal from a store, the owner calls it in. If the cops are a few minutes, the owner forgets their face....


18

We don't know how to digitize, copy, delete, edit, or record memories. The technology to do so is so far advanced from what we currently understand as to be indistinguishable from magic. Any attempt to provide a science-based explanation for how machines are remotely stealing them will come across as awkward for anyone with even a minimal understanding of ...


17

Pre-modern people often had sages and wise men who spent their whole lives memorizing stories. Medieval clergy occasionally would memorize their whole holy book word for word. The Roda don't need anything special, because we didn't need anything special in real life. As for writing at night, they can use a bonfire and polished bronze (really any metal) to ...


16

Memory RNA While not scientifically established (AFAIK), the concept of genetic memory goes as follows (quoted from Wikipedia's memory RNA article): Memory RNA is a hypothetical form of RNA that was proposed by James V. McConnell and others in the 1960s as a means of explaining how long-term memories were stored in the brain. The concept behind it was ...


15

The brain is a strange and complex thing which we don't really understand. However it's suggested that the brain only lays down new memories for new experiences. Once something becomes repetitive your mind takes fewer samples and time passes without notice. What this ultimately means is that Sisyphus' eternity blurs into one long day. Past the first few ...


15

Make it so that each and every person on earth wears an implant that enhances brain functions: increase memory capacity, faster thought processing, and such. That way, memory can be read and written, and stolen, by remotely accessing the device. Artificial enhancements to organs, including brain, should be pretty common in the future.


15

Rationalization In psychology and logic, rationalization or rationalisation (also known as making excuses[1]) is a defense mechanism in which controversial behaviors or feelings are justified and explained in a seemingly rational or logical manner to avoid the true explanation, and are made consciously tolerable—or even admirable and superior—by plausible ...


13

The Dragon is always° the mother. The child develops faster than typical for the 'donor' species, but the pregnancy lasts longer. During this "extra time" between the infant being fully developed and being born, the placenta carries nerve signals in addition to nutrients. This allows the Dragon to "prime" the child's brain and copy memories or skills ...


13

I think they would perfect the art of building mind-palaces. Imagine that the games they played as kids revolved around associating physical items and places of their culture with either a short hand or phonetic version of their language — like how a dreidel is supposed to teach children hebrew characters Then when they mature and have the intellectual ...


11

Few minutes (4 to 5) of anoxia (lack of oxygen supply) are sufficient to cause permanent damage to neurons, compromising a brain's functionality. https://www.spinalcord.com/anoxic-brain-injury On average, the brain can survive a mere four minutes without oxygen, so if you suspect a stroke or other injury that is cutting off oxygen to the brain, you need ...


9

Knowledge is useless without the emotional maturity to apply it. Ask anyone married to an alcoholic or addict! A one-year-old may know all about how electricity works, but when the impulse strikes to stick a fork in a socket, that knowledge will mean nothing. Ask the parent of any teenage male! Up until the age of about 6, the child simply does not have ...


9

To "replicate such firing" is, as noted, impossible in 2 different brains. They are just too different. However, consider that right now, you are reading these words and my thoughts are becoming your thoughts. We have both spent years learning English in order that these formations of black and white pixels fire the correct neurons. This learning process ...


8

I side on Yes. The argument for No, is on episodic memory which is not reliable. But I think this will eventually fall on procedural memory. Now, it is known that the human brain - regardless of age - has some level of plasticity. That means that the human brain never loses his ability to acquire new skills, the human brain can always change the neural ...


8

Repetitive tasks are way to meditate for westeners This is rather addition to great answer from Separatix: Usual eastern meditation techniques require person to sit/lay down and "do nothing". Which is very unusual thing for most westeners. However, when given repetitive, dull task (example clean huge area with broom), your mind becomes to "wander" after ...


8

You aren't going to like my answer. He can't. Proving that something does exist is possible. Proving that something doesn't exist...that's a harder thing. The best you can do is provide evidence of absence. Your guy is trying to prove a negative, which, while not impossible, is not completely provable. In your notes, you have "no friends or relatives" ...


7

For the basic vital signs in real time we would need to store 4 numbers maybe once per second: 4 bytes/number * 4 vital signs * 86400 seconds/day * 365.25 days/year * 7.4E9 people = 3,750,000 TB/year (3,75 EB/year) That would cost anywhere between 200 million and 1.9 billion US dollars, depending on the kind of storage (...


7

There are WAY too many questions here, too many caveats and differing circumstances, and on top of that, is pretty opinion-based and seems to be more about plot generation than world-building. But hey, I'll take a stab... What if a guilty person made a clone of themselves, and implanted their memories into the clone? Would the clone also need to be ...


7

Sounds like a very lonely existence for your protagonist. To know, but never be known. It would be impossible to hold a job or have any kind of meaningful relationship unless there was a way to somehow turn it off or mitigate the effects for short durations. Maybe the longer your protagonist "imprints" on an individual the longer it takes the memories ...


7

Groundhog day This situation would allow the protagonist to repeatedly re-initiate meeting people, each time learning from how their previous "first meeting" or first date went - it can have some parallels to the popular Groundhog day movie.


7

The best explanations for ghosts and/or ghost-like creatures (GLCs) I've seen in literature tend to say the GLCs are one of two things: Not actually a creature/being at all, but just some kind of "emotional/psychic residue" left over from an event at that location. It may look like a person, but it is more like a film of a person -- it maybe can play back ...


7

Changes in Brain Chemistry The transformation causes a change in brain-chemistry on a deep level. Empathic feelings which are usually evoked by other humans, are now only evoked by other vampires. This leads to vampires not seeing humans as the same species anymore. They will see other humans like another animal race and will be affected by human suffering ...


7

No, each person brain is different and the map from one will not produce the same results in another. Due to plasticity and how each brain is individually trained to your sensory organs and experiences each memory in each brain is unique. Each brain a has a unique map of connections called a Connectome. A perfect copy of someone else's memory would require ...


7

There are already several wonderful answers, suggesting the use of: Humans' excellent spatial memory (MPram's and EDL's answers) Rhyme, rhythm and repetition (Carlos Martin's answer) Olfactory triggers (also Carlos Martin's answer) Magical memory enhancement (Vilx-'s answer) Each of these methods can work on its own or combined with others. What they all ...


7

Basically any tradition from indigenous community carries some sort of help toward memorizing something. Stories, dancing, chant, mythology, "sacred" items and clothing, totems, rituals... Memory palaces are indeed one way to memorize in details long lists of elements. However, it works best if it's intertwined with multiple techniques to memorize it : A ...


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