Hot answers tagged

253

Yes, because QA Source: I have been tester for about 9 years. Before you let your robot to run into the wilderness letting him kill help humans, you need to know if the robot knows what is a human and what is not. So in order to test the robot, their software and/or hardware will be tested by humans. Or another automated tests. And you bet there will be ...


97

He could start a cult religion With a near-perfect understanding of human psychology, he should have no trouble convincing people to give him their money. With careful maneuvering and timing, he could build up his organization to have significant economic and legal clout, protecting it from authorities that might try to shut it down. In addition, he has ...


92

There's very little reason to have glowing eyes in the visible spectrum. However, in the IR spectrum, we do see them: The idea is that most IR cameras are not as sensitive as the human eye, so they need extra illumination to see anything. Putting the IR illumination right next to the camera proves to be very effective -- there are no shadows in the scene ...


91

Unlike a flying machine, loss of connection or autopilot malfunction is not catastrophic, in the worst case your tank just sits idle or runs into wall instead of crashing like a flying drone would. Totally incorrect. Quite the opposite actually. Flying autopilots have been common for decades now and they have become even better. If a flying drone loses ...


83

Programming It is my belief that programming cannot be automated. Hear me out. I'm a programmer by trade, and I've often had this discussion with people outside of the field. The most common objection is, "Well, what happens when we get computers/programs/AI's sufficiently complex that we simply have to speak what we want our program to do, and the AI ...


83

"You did what to the controller system?!" Space is boring. Really boring. You just wont believe how vastly, hugely mind-bogglingly boring it is! I mean, you may think it's a bore to go down the street to the chemist's but that's just peanuts to space! Listen... — Paraphrased from the Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy, by Douglas Adams So the ship'...


76

Nope! (but you can still make this story work!) So the short answer is no - the power source would run out the physical hardware of the computer, thrusters, etc. would degrade high energy particles and high-speed dust collisions would slowly convert the spacecraft into a ball of metal and rock 50 years is probably about the limit of what is achievable ...


75

The economy of the world would collapse as business owners everywhere discover that they can fill most of their untrained labor needs for a one time fee of $3000. Those fortunate few who still have jobs would have to buy and customize fembots with military augments and weapons to serve as home defenders against the hordes of starving unemployed.


70

Many good answers here, but I thought I'd add my two cents as a former infantryman. One of the biggest benefits to using a drone aircraft is the mitigation of risk to human life. We are willing to pay a premium in monetary terms in order to limit risk to human operators of our weapons. This works with UAVs because (as was stated previously) Airborne ...


64

There are always two products that a human can produce that a robot cannot: A product produced by human labor An employed human In the former case: if a robot is better at producing something, then it will be more expensive for a human to produce it. This means that human-produced products could become status symbols. Think of it like an extension of the ...


62

No. The question after this becomes rather opinion based. Are there jobs that shouldn't be automated? Considering the possibilities of the next 30 years it's entirely possible that everything from conception and maternity* onwards could be automated. But would you really want to? There are also jobs where it's probably not cost effective to automate ...


54

The answer is comparative advantage. Say robots are 100 times better than humans at making new cars, and 10 times better at repairing cars. If a human and a robot each spend half the day making new cars and half the day repairing cars, the total output is 50.5 man-days new cars and 5.5 man-days repairs, 56 man-days total. If the human repairs cars all ...


54

One possibility is to avoid the problem entirely by making the place you store the dishes also be dishwashers. So you put dirty silverware in the silverware drawer, and clean silverware comes out. The drawer detects dirty silverware and washes them automatically. The cupboard where you store your plates and bowls also washes those plates and bowls if they ...


54

There are two ways to go with this. The way it SOUNDS like you're asking for is for your powered armor to carry an entire second set of ceramic plates all the time can be swapped in and out while you're fighting. I think this is a Bad Idea and I wouldn't equip MY armored minions this way. You're basically handicapping your troops by adding all that extra ...


53

Humans are actually very good at recognizing facial expressions and body language. While it's true that large numbers of people are terrible at it, it's only in comparison to the average human. Assuming unimpaired vision and intelligence, humans use facial expressions to tell who among a group of people is talking, what or whom the person is referring to (...


51

Yes Reading this question made me recall my answer to Can humans interact meaningfully with the economy when robots are better at everything? To quote it: There are always two products that a human can produce that [an AI] cannot: A product produced by human labor An employed human Any job whose description includes that it be performed ...


50

Asimov himself proposed ways to circumvent the Three Laws. "A robot may not harm a human": but what is a human? George-series robots are so human-like that they deduce they are humans. They are actually more human than biological human beings, so the Three Laws mean that they will choose a George over a human being every time. "Harm" -- what is harm? Is it ...


48

Regulations Sure, the robots can do the job better (and usually do) and sure, the AI is capable of handling all the really tricky stuff, but some bean counting jobsworth back on Earth decided that every month a human has to manually inspect the outer hull for anomalies. It made it into the mission regulations due to the insane politics and beaurocratic ...


47

No need... The robot intellect would just know those things that appear in the HUD text. These would be akin to our non-visual senses, like how we know our foot is at this angle or how we know the room is a comfortable temperature. HUD would obstruct or distract actual vision For the robot/cyborg to actually be aware of the HUD text contents, their focus ...


46

Freelance Design/Development/Translation/Law/Ect With superhuman intelligence and speed, the robot could juggle dozens of freelance contracts simultaneously and complete in a single day jobs that would normally take weeks. He could crawl freelancer contracting sites like a spider and automatically apply for jobs. He might need fake credentials to get the ...


45

Why do robots ever get deployed for anything? When they are cheaper. When they are better (more accurate, etc.). When the work is dangerous. Dangerous So how does that apply to law enforcement? Let's start with the last point. Police work can be dangerous. It involves preventing people from doing what they want. Some people will react violently to ...


43

Strategic dilemmas The sad thing is that the cunning robots don't have to do anything. We'll do it ourselves, out of the fear that the other guy is going to do it first. Eurasia is afraid of Estasia, and Estasia is afraid of Eurasia. Both are afraid of Oceania, and Oceania is afraid of them both. There are three main reasons why they will do it: Raw Power:...


42

At present, such an attack would be a laughable failure on the physical level. Most robots can't move, and are dependent on external electric power. We probably wouldn't notice them trying to attack us. Smartcars could do harm, but there aren't very many of them. Having all the world's computers turn on us would be massively inconvenient, and would cause ...


42

The simplest approach would be, as far as I can tell given the tech levels, to have the robots' programming dictate that they need to use those weapons. As a potential option, have the protagonists' enclave be a reenactment park, where humans used to go to watch robots reenact scenes from the old West. For realism, the robots used live rounds, and were ...


42

There are multiple possible reasons for this, but the easiest is that the enemy has a way to render robots ineffective, or worse, turn them against the user. Maybe they are able to hack into the robots easily or shut them down with powerful EMP weaponry. Perhaps they are able to confuse and disorient robots by projecting signals on the same wavelengths they ...


42

Through a non documented feature, the manufacturing company has implemented an auto destruction mechanism in the robot. Their artificial brain meters the interaction with humans. When this drops following their dismissal, they are driven to search proximity with water. Proximity with water provides them a similar gratification to interacting with humans. ...


40

One easy answer is communication limitations. You do need command and control to have uninterrupted access to the front line. Maybe you have instantaneous comms over vast distances, but are they uninterruptable comms? Is it possible to jam an enemy's comm system and interrupt his ability to direct a drone ship? If so, a human-controlled ship will ALWAYS ...


39

Missiles Were my Prior Job I spent 4 years as an Anti Tank Gunner, I have utilized missiles extensively. Back-blast is a major issue. The way missiles manage to not have recoil is that they utilize an explosive charge to propel the missile from the launch tube which is vented out of the back of the launcher. Forget the swooshing missiles of Hollywood, when ...


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