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57

Let's say your magical sphere has radius $r$ of 10km (so just poking up into the outer atmosphere) and is at a temperature $T$ of 1,250K (so glowing a nice warm yellow). The total radiative heat flux from the sphere is given by: $$ Q = \sigma T^{4}. 4\pi r^2 \approx 1.7 \times 10^{14} \mathrm{W} $$ Where $\sigma$ is the Steffan-Boltzman constant. A ...


38

You can make the hammerspace open another portal nearby where there is empty space and disgorge its contents through there. Think of it like a very full bag of water springing a leak as you squeeze the bag smaller. The leak will open up where the fabric is weakest i.e. where there is empty space.


30

Hammerspace becomes unstable, but doesn't disappear completely until empty. The bag's contents spills into the available space until it is filled (possibly under pressure), the rest remains in hammerspace. As soon as anyone opens the enclosure, he's met with an eruption (which can be as much or little violent as you want it) of stuff from the hammerspace, ...


25

My laptop bag has an extra zip, which when unzipped extends the bag's dimensions and gives me about 1.5 inches of extra space to put my things in the main pocket, Magical isn't it !! (I hope you understand what kind of zip I am talking about) You don't need magic to get your clothes done here, a smart tailor can get this done for you. If you can invent ...


15

How about you turn the perspective; his powerful form is the state in which his clothes fit like a glove. And all the other times it looks like he wears his dads pyjamas (aka 1990s gangster style). He could roll up his sleeves and pants, wears a too long belt and too big shoes. Include his flabby undergarments, socks and a hat in your descriptions. Also ...


15

This would introduce the concept of a hammerspace pressure bomb "Pressure" is a slightly misunderstood subject, and isn't necessarily as destructive as you might thing. High pressure can deform and rupture solid objects, but that deformation and rupturing doesn't imply an explosive release of energy. Have a quick read up on hydroforming, for example, or ...


14

Hammerspace is complicated The first thing is that it doesn't strictly have a location in normal space, if it's opened then it has a connection to a specific location, but we're thinking in portals, the one is not necessarily anywhere "near" the other. Only the owner can open the hammerspace, theoretically anyway. It certainly can't be opened from the ...


14

The first thing we must understand is that from a purely kinematic point of view, the heliocentric and geocentric models are both equally correct within the accuracy limits of astronomical instruments available before the, say, 16th century. There was no way for an astronomer who lived before Tycho Brahe to bring serious arguments in favor of one or the ...


13

There are a few spells and magic items in Dungeons & Dragons that have rules for when whatever they're trying to transport has nowhere to go. What happens as a result is usually one of three things: The objects take a load of force damage, and then land back where they were. This can happen when trying to teleport into solid rock. In your case, this ...


13

Knitted or crocheted wool clothing is able to stretch quite a bit. Wool yarn itself is quite elastic - it can stretch and snap back - and you can knit or crochet patterns that allow further flexibility. (American Scientist has an article about this.) A knitted sweater can effortlessly be elongated by up to two times its length. This is certainly enough to ...


11

It will look a lot like a zoo Each enclosure will need to be purpose built based on what you are trying to contain. If you need to contain a hill giant, you'll want an enclosure with massive, thick walls and no protrusions to climb on. If you want to contain a creature that can turn into fog, you will need to make an airtight chamber sealed with special ...


9

Even if "medieval" is limited to Europe, that is a vast area over a span of about 1,000 years from about AD 500 to about AD 1500. Fashions are not necessarily the same over such a vast area, as the folk costumes of different regions attest, and fashions do change over a millennium. Wouldn't you expect some people in the Caliphate of Cordoba in Spain to ...


8

There is no scenario in which the biosphere survives long. You have, at best, a few centuries. Say the fireball is as cool as possible while still being a fireball; 100 degrees celsius. All the oceans will continually drain towards the fireball and will boil on contact, as you said. This is bad news for your biosphere, because that's a huge amount of ...


7

It would be perfectly possible for an extremely advanced civilization, perhaps humans of the future, to create a geocentric solar system. They could take a rogue Earth-sized planet in interstellar space and create a giant sun satellite orbiting the planet with gigantic fusion power generators generating power for thousands of giant lamps aimed at the planet ...


7

You are basically cooking your planet on a stove. This magic fireball is an infinite source of heat, so it will sit there continually pouring heat into the planet's system. Water near it will be heated into steam, but the coolness of the water will not cool the fireball at all. This will cause the overall temperature to rise and rise until everything on the ...


6

You are chasing a non-issue. Unless you are wearing a leather belt medieval clothes do not have anything tight enough to matter for a small change like you want. They didn't wear anything we would call pants and clothing tended to be fairly loose. Here is a great video of medieval peasant getting dressed. The only thing that will give him any trouble is ...


6

Don't give him clothing, per se, give him a robe, with roomy sleeves, open in the front and tied or buttoned closed. Basically a dress like an academic's PhD gown. In medieval times this was not terribly unusual, even men might wear what today we'd call a wrap-around skirt, kilt, or dress, and many articles of clothing were not fitted at all, but meant to ...


6

Objects don't get pushed out of Hammerspace. Hammerspace gets "pulled back". Imagine squeezing several snooker balls into a balloon. The balloon itself is stretched, and under pressure. When you take a pin and burst the balloon, it makes a tiny hole. This hole tears and gets larger, releasing the balls - but it doesn't "throw" them out under pressure. ...


5

Lost Portal If a person is tethered to the pocket dimension dies, then the portal is "released" in the sense that it is no longer tethered to that person. Perhaps the portal to the dimension is itself now wandering around, looking for a place to decompress. Because we're dealing with portals and dimensions, the portal is not stuck inside the metal box ...


5

It's not pointless There's a running joke in my family about the pointlessness of my doing the dishes when you're only going to make them dirty again. Sure the homunculi aren't a permanent mana store, but then nor is the person you stole the mana from in the first place. They either die or their batteries run flat, then you need more people to steal mana ...


5

Recognizably artificial artifacts? Several hundred million years. People are digging up dinosaur bones. Every now and then, the fossils have impressions of wings, feathers, etc. Now imagine digging up human fossils with wristwatches, gold teeth, pacemakers, artificial hip joints. For that matter, ceramics like toilet bowls should make an interesting ...


5

The fundamental problem is that there won't be an ocean left. And evaporating the ocean will destroy the biosphere from the heat. The bottom of the ocean is 1000 bar of pressure. To stop the ocean from flowing in, you need 1000 bar of steam, which requires near star-core scale temperatures (400,000 K). And then you have a star on your planet, which means ...


4

Carbon nanotubes have a fantastic tensile strength, meaning that they work great when you pull them. Bones work mostly in compression, and compressing a long and thin object like a nanotube easily buckle it. But, as anyone riding a bike with a carbon fiber fork can tell you, if you weave the fiber it the nanotubes in a proper way, you can get the fibers to ...


4

Work it backwards in time: someone in a very compressed situation moving to a more confortable, non-compressed situation. Seems like watching a tape of something being co.pressed by a garbage compactor, but on reverse. Setting it forward again, I think expulsion from pocket space would do just that - objects coming out of the pokéball may become smashed ...


4

Capacitors. If you can hold x100, x1000 times the amount of energy it burns, it is a large boon. Like capacitors. They discharge, yet they are cornerstones of the electric world. You may get additional benefits using a dedicated container instead of small containers. Water tanks hold hot water more efficiently the more mass they have. Consider square cube ...


3

Here is something interesting you might use to keep the explosive results of Hammerspace dumping down somewhat It has been theorized that most of what we consider as solid matter is, in fact, empty space. There is distance between the nucleus of an atom and it's electrons. There is space between the individual atoms of a molecule. There are gaps between ...


3

Depending on exactly when and where you’re picturing your medieval-style world, tunics were pretty popular. You could make sure your character just has a woollen tunic or robe that’s a little longer and looser than necessary, so when he transforms, it becomes slightly closer to skintight. With hose (basically leggings) worn underneath the tunic, you could ...


3

The above answers, particularly Stephen's first one which sets out the total power of the object and shows that it can be achieved while maintaining a habitable planetary system, cover most of what you ask, but you do need to consider the location of the object with regard to latitude and relative position of continents. Atmospheres and oceans will convect ...


2

Pleating! Are you aware of the winner of the 2017 James Dyson Award, "Petit Pli"? They are clothes that are designed and carefully pleated to 'grow' up to 7 sizes - this means that clothes worn by a newborn baby will still fit at 2 years old - that's a change from 20" tall to 35" long, or a 75% increase in size! This is almost 5 times as much stretch as a ...


2

Probably, he just wears oversized clothes? And its not so suspicious, because fashion can be funny sometimes beggars and lowlives wear clothes they can get, not ones, they bought. So its not so unusual to see beggar in oversized coat/shirt/etc...


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