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50 votes
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Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

Brains aren't computers We often talk about brains as though they are computers, but while it's often a useful shorthand, it's not accurate. A little inaccuracy can save a ton of explanation, but it ...
Tom's user avatar
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29 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

The thing about a brain is, it's already got a daemon in it. After all, what are we but tenuous wisps of information inhabiting a physical substrate? If a daemon wanted to inhabit a brain it would ...
N. Virgo's user avatar
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21 votes

A person has composite memories from countless pasts - how would you detect this with modern medical equipment?

Modern medical equipment could not identify the specific situation. fNCI, fMRI and the like cannot "read memories" in any way. If you were generalising from stories where that was possible ...
John Dallman's user avatar
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19 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

Human brains are not - and let me be completely clear here, not even a little bit - like computers. (And before anyone complains, I'm not the one that tagged this as neuroscience!) Computer hardware ...
Corey's user avatar
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15 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

Doped silicon is just simpler than organic molecules. Yes, they can tamper with neurons, but they have to know what they are doing, and it's just easier to do it with logic gates than with the mess ...
Mary's user avatar
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12 votes

A person has composite memories from countless pasts - how would you detect this with modern medical equipment?

By seeing brain areas not be active fMRI and EEG is probably your best bet. Let's take martial arts as an example. Because it is both about the experience and skill, we know that both the temporal ...
Trioxidane's user avatar
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11 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

It's for a story where you want demon-infested electronics? Tin whiskers. And various other metal whiskers. Under strain (from temperature, vibration, induced magnetic fields, whatever), tin and other ...
fectin's user avatar
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10 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

Demons can start manipulating electrical signals below 0,2 micrometers and they can mostly influence electrons traveling through circuits directly. The human nervous system works at around 0,2 microns....
Demigan's user avatar
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10 votes
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How could real-time sentence translation work if using a "common middle ground" language?

You're overthinking it. This happens all the time with bilingual speakers. Their native tongue may order words in one way, but their learned language orders words a different way. When such a person ...
David's user avatar
  • 1,622
9 votes
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What would the consequences of abusing my fictional drug be?

The typical response of the brain to any neuroactive drug is to reduce sensitivity to the drug and whatever natural compound it is an analogue of. So, if we have a drug that increases neuroplasticity ...
Monty Wild's user avatar
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8 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

This sounds eerily similar to Warhammer 40K... And so I will borrow an idea from 40K: Sufficiently advanced computers become aware of the presence of Demons before they develop a set of Ethics. The ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
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8 votes

Could a human brain be non-lethally manipulated by an array of overlapping masers (microwave lasers)?

If you replace your microwave lasers with (electric) magnets, then this is something which is actually being used in medical research right now. Transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used to "...
Hajaku's user avatar
  • 81
8 votes

Could a human brain be non-lethally manipulated by an array of overlapping masers (microwave lasers)?

Microwaves, when absorbed, interact with the rotational and vibrational states of the interacting molecules. In layman terms they warm them up. As far as I know, the only thing that excess heat does ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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8 votes
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Eternity - psychological process behind forgetting one's name

To forget the old, they will live the new. https://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/celt/ift/ift01.htm "The creatures of the forest scented me and knew I was alone. They stole with silken pad behind my ...
Willk's user avatar
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7 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

They hate water Human beings, including our brains, are bags of mostly water. It turns out that water is deadly to the aliens. In much the same way, that when we mix water with electronics bad things ...
Rob's user avatar
  • 3,068
7 votes

Would a genetically-inserted “memory” be present in all neurons? Or just specific neurons?

Unlike us mammals, who rely most on learning, some kinds of animals, most notably birds and insects, rely very strongly on very elaborate and complex built-in instincts. At the initial point in the ...
AlexP's user avatar
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6 votes

This drug can rewire the brain and “insta-teach”. How fast can I make it work?

Dream Learning 1: Hacking the brain requires using the brain The best way to make a believable "brain hack" is to treat it kind of like a computer hack. You can not force the brain (or a ...
Nosajimiki's user avatar
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6 votes

Are Liquid Brains Possible or Viable?

In terrestrial biology, brains work by having many neurons, each with many connections to other neurons. It is thought that the particular number and position of the connections between neurons - the ...
Monty Wild's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Demonic possession - incubating in different lobes of the brain yielding different trauma?

So, taking your idea of a turbo charged brain as acting similarly to a brain in an epileptic fit state, that is, receiving too many inputs, your classic interpretation of an epileptic fit is a frontal ...
howlieT's user avatar
  • 196
5 votes

Eternity - psychological process behind forgetting one's name

Trick them into believing they already forgot a few chunks of their life. Like I said in my comment, if you want a person to forget their name and identity, leaving them alone in a space is not a good ...
ProjectApex's user avatar
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5 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

As much as I like some of the other answers, they’re missing something somewhat fundamental: biology heals. Silicon computers can’t heal themselves from Daemon damage. Flaws and failure will persist ...
Telastyn's user avatar
  • 5,639
5 votes

Why is Hyperspace more hostile to computers than human brains?

Computers Are Dumb People think that computers are exceptionally smart because they are able to perform rapid mathematical calculations and initiate complicated processes in the blink of an eye. As a ...
Zibbobz's user avatar
  • 4,306
5 votes

Could a substance (drug, chemical, etc.) instantly teach a language?

RNA theoretically could because it can transfer memories. That has been demonstrated in snails, at least. Though it might take a while to load into the brain's optimization system enough to make ...
Aseku Vena's user avatar
5 votes

How could real-time sentence translation work if using a "common middle ground" language?

Fun idea. The use of the common language is a red herring. In the end, a sentence formulated in the speaker's language has to be cast in the listener's language. In the field of automated translation, ...
AlexP's user avatar
  • 90.6k
5 votes

How could real-time sentence translation work if using a "common middle ground" language?

Time to invoke some Clarkean Magic I know two languages: my native English and Finnish. English tends to put the subject before the verb. Finnish tends to put the subject after the verb. (thanks @...
JBH's user avatar
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5 votes

This drug can rewire the brain and “insta-teach”. How fast can I make it work?

There's 2 options here: 1: Matrix esque system - in the scene where Trinity doesn't know how to fly a Helicopter, she calls up link who grabs a minidisk (peak 90s!), inserts it and then uploads it to ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
  • 27.5k
5 votes

Feasibility of a convergent neural code across species?

It is not feasible at all to suppose that when comparing a human's neurology to the physical and chemical processes that produce an alien's thought processes that they will in any way be similar. ...
Monty Wild's user avatar
  • 61.9k
4 votes

Eternity - psychological process behind forgetting one's name

I literally forget my own name from time to time and I'm not immortal, I have been alive only 23 years as matter of fact. Why does it happen to me? Probably because I never use my name,I never meet ...
Drien RPG's user avatar
  • 383
4 votes

Hearing effects of shifted time perception.(Bullet-Time)

Would accelerating a person's perception of time dislocate the range of audible frequencies or make what they hear sound deccelerated, and thus, lower pitched? As it often happens... it depends. If ...
LSerni's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Theoretically, how long could a brain "last" if the body it was in was biologically immortal?

It would seem that there is some debate about the maximum limit of a human life span 115-120 years might seem a reasonable estimate today. https://time.com/4835763/how-long-can-humans-live/ Given the ...
Slarty's user avatar
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