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48

Skeletons pushed together get tangled up with each other easily. The protruding ribs tend to cross the ribs of other skeletons and once that happens it is tricky for the two to extricate themselves from each other. If you add more skeletons it gets trickier. Bare foot bones have almost no traction. A mans skeleton weighs 10-15 kg. That is 30 lbs max. ...


22

Skeletons are very light - about 10 kg for adult European males. In fact, their equipment is likely to weigh more (gladius, 1 kg; Roman shield, 10 kg). This low weight can be used tactically, especially as they will be rather top-heavy, with almost all weight above their hips. For instance, two groups of soldiers running with a rope between them could bowl ...


22

Self-contradictory question is self-contradictory "My fictional universe is set in a time period akin to the european Middle Ages/Renaissance. Think of the 1400s-1500s for reference." "Gun powder does not exist in my fictional world." "Technology and metallurgy ha[ve] allowed a given kingdom to develop steam-powered machines. All other innovations that can ...


19

From the perspective of an individual soldier in an ancient army, there's really no difference before and after the amalgamation. Regiments will continue to be raised primarily from one part of the empire: say, three from Alicevania, two from Bobtopia, one from Evopolis. If you're a Bobtopian slinger, you serve in a regiment that is almost if not entirely ...


19

The good news is that without gunpowder and its derivatives, there's a limit to how much damage your airships could do. They don't have bombs or rapid-fire guns, and while they could drop incendiaries (like flaming oil) or just toss heavy objects over the side, they're severely limited in how much of either they could carry. Their main threat is probably ...


14

I really like the idea of war dogs chewing up skeleton’s leg bones. It is a pretty entertaining image to me. The roman military was very adaptable. They consistently revised their tactics and formations to deal with the unique properties of their opponents. I think that they’d form their units around small numbers equipped with either tower shields and ...


13

Clubs, maces, and warhammers. Blunt force trauma in general. So instead of a gladius they would use a weapon of the above. Smashing weapons would allow to break the bones into many pieces that would be picked by other soldiers to be disposed off. Also if they depend on their head to fight then getting the heads off would be smart as you can neutralize ...


11

Most fuel cells don't take raw hydrogen, but hydrogen containing compound like hydrocarbons on hydrides. This means, you will still be using natural gas in your hydrogen economy, simply to a much lesser extent as the fuel cell is going to be far more efficient than a heat engine. Secondly, methane (the major component of natural gas) can be generated ...


10

Nothing on the surface. In this scenario, topside ships of any size are sitting ducks. If your oceangoing vessels are going to survive they need to all be subsurface where a thick blanket of water protects against lasers, railguns and missiles.


9

Is it the threat of the slaughter of kindred that essentially forces these soldiers into the ruling army? That's a possible reason, but the overriding one is that they are soldiers, no work, no pay, they'll starve to death. So either they just work for a new employer who has been proven to be successful and might make them wealthy, or they run away and ...


9

Decentralized rather than Hardened The thing about hydrogen as a fuel is that all you need to produce it is electricity and water. With solar and wind power becoming more and more widespread, the fuel they're using to generate electricity is literally the sun and the wind, which no military force can disrupt. On the other hand, fossil-fuel power relies on ...


9

Yes, it could, but the question is why. Plasma either destroys whatever it touches, or cools and stops being plasma when it touches things. So you need to do what fusion reactors do, and contain the plasma with powerful electromagnets, not just a durable container. But then you could just use the same magnets to push the projectile. Remember, whatever ...


8

Regardless, whether you run on coal, oil, gas, nuclear, wind, hydro... at the end of the day you end up with some more or less vulnerable power plants and power grid that's an easy target, even for a madman with an axe. You are not specially less vulnerable when you have refineries and exposed pipelines. So how to harden? While usually renewables tend to ...


8

Air ships would not be worth much offensively. Sun Tsu: "the worst policy of all is to besiege walled cities". https://suntzusaid.com/book/3 But if you gotta - consider: the walls are thick. Knocking them down is going to take repeated action - a ram, or many stones thrown, or cannonballs. If you are on the ground you can scavenge stuff to throw and ...


8

Ice caltrops. By itself, it won't be enough to stop all attacks, but it's an economical use of water that is easy to conceal and can seriously snarl a horde of barbarians running over it. Which would buy your ice mages time to escape. And it can be planted in advance. Magic non-melting ice would also make a convenient all-purpose construction glue. Need to ...


7

So, slightly unhelpful answer: they'll cost enough to keep your game balanced. More practical answer: economies of scale will make things cheaper and easier to come by, though do be aware of tropes like Adam Smith Hates Your Guts or No Hero Discount. As far as killing monsters goes everyone is going to be happier when there are more people available and ...


7

Flak is still valid The whole point of flak is that you don't need to hit something. All you need to do is shoot in front of the plane and it flies into a cloud of high speed metal fragments. If you look at the Russian BUK anti aircraft missiles such as the one that shot down flight MH17, it's design to explode near the aircraft and spray fragments leaving ...


7

There were already many food preservation techniques used by sailors and armies by the renaissance that allowed them to store food for months or years if need be. Flour can be kept and only cooked into bread/biscuits/etc as needed giving you a reliable source of carbohydrates. Dried and salted meats give you proteins. Certain cheeses can last a long time ...


5

Perhaps there would be an increased emphasis on stealth and other methods of cloaking or generating disinformation as to the whereabouts of a warship. Because a supersonic missile is useless if the enemy ship can't be detected or tracked. Electronic warfare would be particularly important. If an enemy can be detected before they can detect you then the ...


5

When wrestling with magical items interacting with non-magical items, it can always get a bit messy. A "real" ice sword break after a single swing, and might cause some lacerations but won't cleave foes in two. If we can magically increase the sharpness and strength of the weapons then maybe, but those are nobs you could tweak to become really over powered....


5

Material choice for your bullet seems likely to devolve to glass, stone of some kind, wood, or various minerals -- most of which are compounds of metals, but the question says compounds aren't a problem, only the pure(ish) metallic material itself. However, most of these material choices aren't likely to take rifling, and it's obvious the barrel can't be ...


4

In historical practice this varied widely. It really depends on so much going on in the world at that time, what the societies look like, how big the armies are, etc. Here are just two examples of how this could work in your story: To face a larger threat Philip II of Macedon had quire remarkable victory at the Battle of Chaeronea, which wiped out most ...


4

The USS Virginia and the Indian Navy's Arihant-class submarines provide a hint of what the future might hold. While notionally attack submarines (SSN), they actually have the ability to carry and fire strategic weapons. The Virginia displaces 7000 tons, while the Arihant displaces about 6000 tons. Arihant-class submarine Couple this to the ability of the ...


4

In some ways, naval combat would go back to how it was pre-WW2. If you have lasers capable of reliably intercepting hypersonic anti-ship cruise missiles (such as the upcoming BrahMos-II) then aircraft that have to carry meatbags have no hope. No aircraft carriers, though ships might reasonably expect to carry drones for reconnaisance use. The maximum range ...


4

In a state of warfare like this, ships would be incredibly obsolete. The technologies you mentioned would—as Willik stated—be catastophic to the entire endeavor of naval warfare in their own right, but I think that the implications of those technologies quite easily allow for anti-naval strategies even more devastating. Take, for example, the extensive use ...


4

A pitchfork, a lance, a pillum, trident. And net. Retarius gladiator type of equpiment. You catch the skeletons, with nets, then load them with pitchfork into mills. Or you take a roller, give it to the Turtle formation and just, well, roll over the skeletons. Destroying skeleton is easy, the don't have meat, or tendons or skin that would disurb ...


4

@Willk has the right idea, I believe. Tangle them up! It doesn't matter how strong that pile of bones is, if it weights 20kg it can be pushed around by a child, let a lone a fully grown, fully trained roman soldier. The problem is cheap solutions will probably have unreliable results, so forget the rope and horses. Surround and collapse the skeleton ...


4

First defenses coming to mind are passive ones, such as smoke curtains, to prevent the airships from actually seeing their targets fire updraft, related to the above, a large fire can cause a strong updraft which could disturb airships anti-air crossbows, which should reach the flight height of the ships, possibly with incendiary arrows barring nets, kept ...


4

The main issue for having ballista/catapults on a ship is given by their size and mass. Considering the usual design of a medieval ship, having a large mass high above the center of mass of the ship would have unbalanced the whole assembly, especially upon launching the projectile with the involved jolt. If I remember correctly certain ships could not fire ...


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