40

Potentially, it would be very similar to life made out of matter. Antimatter is expected to have the same chemistry as normal matter, so any lifeforms would work the same way with the exception that if they even touched our world they would instantly annihilate. However! There is a lot about physics we don't know. Under the assumption that antimatter is ...


22

Just like us But don't touch them. Lots of science fiction likes to attribute special or near magical properties to antimatter. This is rubbish. The only thing special about anti-hydrogen, is if you touch it with hydrogen, they annihilate in a tremendous release of energy. Two atoms of anti-hydrogen and one of anti-oxygen would still make one molecule ...


18

Blood, by its very nature, is an oxidant. As such, it's the exact opposite of an anti-oxidant. This may sound obvious, but thinking through the implications a little deeper makes one realise that there are some serious differences to nutrition going on in a vampire's physiology by comparison to a normal human. In point of fact, this is a paradox in how ...


12

They are a genetically identical nest, like the social insects. Making war means cooperation, which means putting the needs of the group ahead of the needs of the individual. Humans are able to do that to some degree which accounts for much of our success as a species. The social insects do that better than anything else. The organism is the nest and ...


8

Feared by whom? The bluebottle does not fear the lion. The elephant also doesn't much fear the lion*. *exceptions apply Here lies your most important factor. Life seeks niches where there isn't too much competition, and where there is a niche there is more life. Each form of life fears its own predators, but to a lion the fly is a minor irritant. If the ...


7

Fetal cells do enter the mother, and take up long term residence. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633676/ Fetal cells migrate into the mother during pregnancy. Fetomaternal transfer probably occurs in all pregnancies and in humans the fetal cells can persist for decades. Microchimeric fetal cells are found in various maternal tissues ...


7

Despite their reputation for being dangerous locations, if you want an environment that breeds aggressive animals, you probably don't want a rainforest. The complex topology of rainforests gives them a lot of hiding spots, favoring a hide-or-ambush predator-prey game, rather than bloody brawling. In fact this is the main reason why they are so dangerous to ...


6

Well let's be perfectly honest here and say that what determines the birth rate of any species is so deep into our genome that we are not even certain in real life. If you just say, "Female vampires can only give birth once every 5 years," no biologist on earth will question that. Unless your story is taking place in a genomics laboratory, you're never going ...


5

Hemoglobin is well integrated into the organism. Swapping in foreign stuff would cause the organism to crash. There are lots of aspects of the organism that depend on the structure of hemoglobin. How it is carried in the red cell. Iron metabolism. Copper metabolism. Handling degradation products. Oxygen affinity. Really a bucketload of integral ...


5

Your species reproduces by attaching to any sperm and/or egg cells, but doing so like a virus which lays dormant in a lysogenic cycle. Viruses replicate using either the lytic cycle (where virus cells are produced very quickly and destroy the host cell), or the lysogenic cycle (where the viral DNA is implanted into the host cell which continues to reproduce ...


5

If you're talking about combining DNA to produce viable offspring - not a chance. I've already gone over this in a similar question, so I'll just copy that part to here. The problem with this is that even if there is a mechanism for combining DNA arbitrarily, you can't plug bits of DNA into another species with a different evolutionary path and ...


4

Tim's answer was great, but there's just one small thing I'd like to add to that. In the world we know, it seems in a great many cases that predators and creatures good at evading predators have fewer children the further up the food chain we go. With what little I know of vampires, they're at the top, possibly with some other fantasy critters to go with ...


4

Fairly easily done. You need a long neck and a barrel chest. It just needs to be long enough and shaped to create the necessary resonance. Humans can create a very broad range of pitches with a more or less standard set of apparatus (chest cavity, throat, vocal chords, and mouth). Ever noticed how a tall guy tends to have a deeper voice than the shorter ...


4

It should be possible for your dragon to pick up pebbles, which it stores in a small pouch near its throat. When it needs to attack, the pouch will contract and bring the pebbles to the back of its mouth. Muscles in the throat will block of the oesophagus and the nose, so that when the dragon forcefully exhales, the air from its lungs forces out the pebbles ...


4

One of the key adaptations for flight is lightness, particularly in bone structure. Weight, where needed, is optimised to support flight: even birds of prey don't have big muscly legs, for their killing impact they rely on sharp claws and beak. So your creatures, if human-sized, would be considerably less robust than a human, less able to carry heavy weights ...


4

The exact comparison is difficult to make as it would depend on how the creatures used their wings. If they spent a lot of time soaring and gliding they might be able to get away with much less strength than creatures that had to climb and dive a lot to escape predators. That said it is entirely reasonable to assume that the creatures and humans would be of ...


4

Probably just like us. We still don't know some other (normal-matter) biology except our own (we don't even know all the dark corners of our own biology). It may or may not be similar to our own. Keep in mind that A LOT of our own biology is randomness fixed and multiplied by the inheritance. There is such a thing like a convergent evolution - except that ...


3

For a race of galactic conquerors, biological traits would be secondary to social and psychological ones. The species may be small and weak, but they should value cooperation, possess an expansionist's mindset and feel no mercy towards other sentinels. Physical weakness can be complemented by technology. The lack of bravery and determination can not be. ...


3

Predator features here on earth include: - Eyes on the front of the head: binocular vision helps tracks prey - Claws, Fangs and sharp teeth for eating meat - Fast reflexes - Lean build - tails are possible, they help with balancing during high-speed chases Senses like smell or eyesights are equally important for predator and prey, so I would not expect ...


3

I don't think it would make a difference, except positive would be negative and negative would be positive. From our perspective. Antimatter is the opposite of matter, kind of like the equivalent negative number, but only if they violently exploded when combined instead of just being zero. (It does end up as zero, but after the violent explosion.) It makes ...


3

As Willk said, hemoglobin is a very widespread protein and just "swapping it out" in humans (or other vertebrates) is pretty much impossible, without turning your test subject into something that is most definitely not whatever you started out with. If you want to handwavium the fact that vertebrates have been using hemoglobin for the past X million years, ...


3

TL;DR: no. Electroreception that works underwater is fundamentally different from electroreception that works above water. You're not going to create an electric circuit in air, even if it is really misty or really rainy, unless either you, or the things you're trying to find, are generating ridiculously high voltages (think tesla coil, not electric eel... ...


3

At close distances it could. I am thinking of small things in a dark world. In close proximity, electrostatic forces come into play. We can see that at work with our own bodies - if you scuff your feet on a dry day and accumulate charge, you can see the hairs on your arm stand up when they approach a conductive object. My own experiments with flies and a ...


3

I'm going to assume you want the classical "brute extremely dangerous fighter culture in space" type of warrior, if not then Willk's answer should be it. While strength is often prized, strength will not win you a space battle with guns. An intelligent silverback gorilla would carry a big gun and take a lot of firepower to take down but he would also ...


2

Aside from increasing the salinity, you may play with some additional concepts. Even on earth there exists something called Antifreeze proteins that allow some fish to exist below the freezing temperature of Earth's ocean (about –1.9 °C) without increasing salinity of their bodies. In fact, the salinity balancing in vertebrates is a rater complex subject. ...


2

Your mention of DNA suggests that your "xeno aliens" aren't actually that alien after all, which is presumably how the scientists were able to "combine" it with human cells. Well, if the "alien" DNA is that compatible with humans, then one issue is the presence of endogenous retroviruses in the inserted DNA sections. These are usually passive and inert if ...


2

There is one point here that is pretty problematic. 1 Child per vampire couple, from a species perspective, is ultimately suicidal. From that perspective you are pretty much halving the population every generation since the one child is all there is to replace 2 adults down the road. That does not make any sense at all from a purely biological standpoint. ...


2

It is known that a mother's immune system can attack her fetus if their blood types don't match. In response, a fetus with a strong self-defense inducing mutation could naturally try to understand why it's being considered as a foreign body and alienate the mother's blood type. This wouldn't work as planned, of course, and cause all types of side effects ...


2

Here is a completely different approach. What is it about the bite of a vampire that turns a non vampire? Let us imagine that there is a chemical generated in their fangs that deposits a retrovirus into the blood stream of the victim, transforming their genome and reforming their body. So what would happen if a vampire bit another vampire? Were that ...


2

Though the other answers are all correct, I'd like to add the following: there is one thing we don't know for sure yet, whether antimatter is subject to gravity as normal matter ! See Gravitational interaction of antimatter on wikipedia.


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