10

The problem is mass. Large pterodactyls like Q. Northropi evolved only at the expense of having to shed every gram of unnecessary weight possible. Their bones were full of air spaces that saved weight at the expense of load bearing capability. And their muscle mass was restricted to the minimum needed to get them airborne and up to altitude. After that like ...


8

The dragon riders would be children Like other answerers have pointed out, a grown human is too heavy to be carried any significant distance, but a small enough child should be light enough. Children have been used for all sorts of things that adults are too large to do. Probably the most applicable example is camel jockeys. According to the Wikipedia ...


6

This answers assumes that Belzova occupies the territory known as Novorossiya. The question wants it somewhere in the north-western horn of the Black Sea, but on one hand there isn't all that much space there, and on the other hand changing both history and geography is too much. Long story short, Belzova remained independent because it was never part of the ...


6

An informal analysis says probably yes but it would be as expensive as the Z3 or ENIAC and it would not be particularly fast. Going by the description and walkthrough of DES here, the bulk of the operations are permutations and XOR. From the hardware perspective, static permutation is just a matter of wiring and XOR can be implemented using relays as shown ...


6

Aristotle was many things, but a physicist he wasn't. Yes, he did write a book titled Physicê acroasis, and yes, we do traditionally translate its title as Physics, but that just a traditional mistranslation. The correct translation of the title would be Lecture about nature -- the Greek word physis means origin or nature. First, we should understand that &...


2

1919-1923: Corridor Preservation When the Grand Trunk Railway, National Transcontinental Railway, Canadian Government Railway, and other bankrupt/overbuilt projects were merged into CN, some duplicate lines fell into disuse and were eventually abandoned. Had duplicate lines been preserved by the Crown for (subsidized) passenger use in the 1920s, they would ...


2

you can count the US as the second country without high speed rail. even though there is some of it. it is whoefully inadequate. a bunch of things are contributing to this lack of high speed rail in north america. car dependency great aeroplane network low population density low fuel cost major parts of north america are built for cars. you are expected to ...


2

A big Q. northropi may have the ability fly that far if it was unencumbered and could catch some good thermals. Slapping a human on its back would likely greatly decrease its range. But, it would be a formidable way to discourage European real estate ambitions. :-) 1642: Able Tasman's expedition lost without a trace. 1769 (as reported by one of the few ...


2

No. Even if we suspend disbelief of various scientific issues with grafting (rejecting the body part, nerve connections, muscle fiber/ligament connections, how the brain reinterpret all the new nerve endings, and learn to pass signals to the new, entirely foreign body part and recognize a dog's head as an analog to its own horse head (a body likely may not ...


1

You can justify many different systems. The per capita GDP means they have a decent "pie" to share out. That means they can afford to have some "inaccuracies" in the rules -- people getting welfare who might possibly find a job. But that's also psychology. Taxpayers resent it if they perceive some to be freeloaders, even if the ...


1

Domesticating the pterosaur implies domesticating the moa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moa Before the arrival of human settlers, the moa's only predator was the massive Haast's eagle... Polynesians arrived sometime before 1300, and all moa genera were soon driven to extinction by hunting and, to a lesser extent, by habitat reduction due to forest ...


1

This question raises a subsequent question: if this trade empire existed up into near modern times, would it have allowed the spice trade network to exist? Most of European trade expansion in the 1400's was due to the demand for spices, not silk, and the enormous profits that trading spices brought. Later, the demand on China was for tea, not silk. So, this ...


1

China, not Southwestern Asia, began the Bronze Age in 3300 BCE. There no polity recognizable as China in the time frame associated with the Mediterranean Bronze Age. If you mean China in a purely geographic sense, then this assertion is actually not all that far from real history; the oldest bronze objects found in geographical China belong to the Majiayao ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible