43

Word of mouth says: "An act of God" People living in France wouldn't see direct evidence of Asia disappearing - but they would hear about it soon enough! Eastern Europeans would see direct evidence of the land next to their houses disappearing. Such a catastrophe would immediately spread across the continent through word of mouth because of its religious ...


28

Density The problem with quipu is the information density. We don't know exactly how much literal information can contain a quipu, because we can't decipher the literal quipu yet. This books states: Alothether 46 different items of information were kept on this recording device no larger than an ordinary kitchen mop. In this case, the author is talking ...


25

You'd need the weaving equivalent of a printing press The printing press revolutionized "writing" and the spread of knowledge on paper. You no longer needed trained scribes laboring on each page of a book to copy it. This allowed literacy to spread across the population (eventually). I expect that your Incas could make do with hand-knotted documents for ...


17

Common folk in 15th century Europe surely would notice if Asia vanished, though it might take a while. How? They'd notice that their "betters", the wealthy and the nobility, quit having new silk garments made (because there was no new silk to make them from). Servants in the mansions and palaces would notice first, then the word would pass from them to ...


13

People would notice it, but they wouldn't necessarily know what happened I'm going to assume you meant that all of the land that makes up Asia just disappeared one day. To answer your question directly at first: Europe is connected to Asia: so people at the arbitrary edge at which point Europe turns into Asia would disappear. Traders would know - and ...


10

Yes The 15th century Europeans had two qualities which would ensure that everyone knew about this. The first is that they knew that Asia existed, and regularly traded with it. The second quality is that they had quite a powerful religious organization in the Church. This is how I see the timeline: Asia disappears. A few weeks or months pass, and a ...


9

This is kind of a mixed ball of stuff here. As for the hypothetical village, peoples in villages didn't get around much. It's sort of accepted that the bulk of the population in a village was pretty stationary, with folks living their entire lives never travelling much more than 30 km from where they were born. Yes, there are traders, nomadic people ...


9

It appears that in the Battle of Thymbra, in the Lydia-Persian war (6th century BCE), 100,000 casualties took place in a single day. This was with early Iron Age swords and spears, breasplates and helmets, significantly less advance technology than what you'd see as late as 1000 CE. If the two armies are as large as those at this battle, there's no reason ...


8

There are two ways to preserve megafauna as seen in our world’s history, and the two case studies will serve as names for the models. The Madagascar Scenario Elephant Birds were the largest avians to ever tread the earth since the K-T extinction 65 million years ago, and they survived well into the Middle Ages. This is because human beings did not reach ...


7

Seems like killing off all the humans is the most effective solution. Early on, there were few enough that one good plague could have done the job. If you need the people alive, then I suggest making potassium extremely rare. Humans can survive on a deficit, but it limits our ability to think. By keeping humans relatively dumb, they won’t be able to ...


7

It seems to me like the natural way to "read" the knots in Quipu would be with the fingers which puts me in mind of Braille. As other posters have mentioned the fundamental problems with Quipu are information density and reproducibility. These are the problems your Alternative Inca will have to solve but coming from a background with a tactile alphabet they ...


6

Bringing the Pacific Ocean all the way to the Urals would have a profound impact on travel and geopolitics even if there were no associated weather changes. The central European powers might consider the states of India, Bactria, Central Asia, and the far East irrelevant, but the powers immediately bordering central Europe would not. Poland-Lithuania and ...


6

Yes, they would notice They would notice within a couple months at least, a few decades at most, depending on the exact part of the century. The 15th century was when the printing press was invented, and it spread fast. Also in the 15th century the Portuguese developed caravels and one dude called Vasco da Gama made an amazing discovery: they could sail ...


6

Awful information density As cyrus said in his answer, you can't mass produce anything with this system. but there is another problem: information density. Even if we stick with numbers, you need a new rope for each 3 digits. 203 956 for example would need 2 little ropes. And it's quite simple as there are only three types of knots, one for the hundreds, ...


6

I haven't tried using it, but quipu looks like a horribly slow way to record a message. Unless the old way of doing things was enforced with a hideous fanaticism, I can't see the Aztec scribes using quipu for very long once they saw how quickly a Spaniard could dash off a message with ink and paper. This is most especially important in a military situation; ...


5

In order to flesh out your advanced Inca empire, you might want to research three subjects: Ada Lovelace, tree structuring, and the Yupana. Ada Lovelace. She was the first person to realize and write down the idea that the Babbage analytical engine was suitable for recording and manipulating textual data like Shakespeare's plays. She described a kind of ...


5

The Siege of Baghdad could offer you a clue. It lasted about 12 days and resulted in the deaths of over 90,000 people, all done with 13th century weapons. This was Baghdad, mind you. And it had boltholes, places to hide, streets to fight in with choke points, etc. It would take a lot longer than the scenario you have in mind As I recall, the Mongols ...


4

Most common people in central Europe in the 15th century wouldn't be likely to notice for quite a while if EVERYTHING more than a hundred miles from where they were born vanished. The only people who would be likely to notice your proposed scenario would be people directly involved in the Silk Road trade, and even they wouldn't be able to easily tell the ...


3

Information density vs Speed of information Processing While paper offers higher information density (per grams) knots and quipu could offer support for faster information processing than paper: more advanced ways of modelling information (though this could do with a bit of hand waving) but a recent branch of mathematics known as knot theory which would ...


3

Yes, everyone on earth would notice it If the whole land mass of Asia suddenly disappeared then this would soon be very noticeable because of the extreme wind speeds as air and water from the rest of the planet fills up the void. Cities within a hundred kilometers from the Asian border would be blown away, a large part of the world population would be ...


2

They would know something was wrong, but not what it was for a little while Climactic Effects: Asia is the largest landmass on earth, and thus it’s massive size has a considerable effect on the climate due to how much heat is reflected by land compared to water. Magically removing Asia would mean that the waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans would ...


2

Don't forget the Ottoman Empire Most answers focus on the Far East. However, the Ottoman Empire was a big player in European politics, having conquered vast territories in the South-East of Europe and was in the process of pushing onward. The question is based on late medieval Bohemia. Which was directly bordering Hungary. Which in turn was directly ...


2

12-24 hours I won’t give you an exact number of hours, because as you stated in your prompt some people were making last stands in little circles. Some people would be able to last just a little longer or fold faster. Elsewhere in this thread people have given great historical examples like Thymbra, Baghdad, and of course Cannae, which is the absolute best ...


1

I can give some general sense of what the world was like in a few large time periods, that might help (this is all from Sapiens, which I highly recommend reading if you want a broad sense of world history) 10,000 bc: first agricultural civilizations. Small towns of no more than 1000. No major civilization. Agricultural revolutions happened independently in ...


1

They wouldn't notice for long enough to matter. Just ignore the bits about the dragon taking off and you still have your answer: basic planetary destruction at worst, entirely planetary surface remodeling at best. If you suddenly whisk away several billion cu km of rock (all the lands with everything on them are just gone), the rest of the planet isn't ...


1

So your question poses the situation of the world as it was in the 15th Century, plodding along, until in the blink of an eye, everything east of the Urals, the eastern shore of the Mediterranean, Black and Red Seas, and north of the Indian Ocean, is - poof - just gone. No land, no animals, no people, just a massive hole down to bedrock where Russia, China, ...


1

The beginning of the 15th century was about AD 1401. At that time Russia was a tributary of the Golden Horde which ruled partially in Europe and partially in Asia. At that time the Ottoman Turks were expanding from Asia into Europe, and had already moved their capital to Adrianople in Europe. The Ottomans besieged Constantinople for 12 years from 1390 ...


1

Huricanes / typhoons. These things are unknown in Europe because Europe has Asia to the east and the tropical cyclons generally start over the water and move to the west. Now Europe has rather large ocean (pacific + what was Asia) and all the circular atmospheric phenomena, probably even stronger than in east Asia, because they have more ocean to grow in. ...


1

Dropping sea levels and a change in climate have already been covered. But I have the impression that removing enormous amounts of planet stuff should influence plate tectonics. After all, planet stuff is comparably heavy (although the upper layer must be the lightest part, since the heavier stuff mostly sank to the ground when it was still molten. Anyway. ...


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