12

Very little, I'm afraid. The computer is not really the important thing - the mathematical models are. One hundred years in the past it's 1919. The computer will remain a one-of-its-kind device since the transistor is a good twenty years in the future, at best. There is not the knowledge required to fully make use of the device. Yes, it could run very long ...


10

I won't dare sticking my finger into the relativistic theory of rotating bodies, I will just go with the approximation of linear motion, which is valid for infinitesimal rotations. We know that, by relativity, the mass of an object moving at velocity v is increased according to Lorentz factor $\gamma=$$1 \over \sqrt{1-v^2/c^2}$. Therefore, the more the ...


9

This question has actually been well studied throughout the years and is closely related to the Ehrenfest paradox. The answer is no-- it's impossible to spin a giant disk in a way such that its outer rim moves faster than the speed of light. First and foremost, it's a rather basic derivation from the postulates of special relativity to show that no object ...


8

Millisecond pulsars! Gravity waves! Imperial to metric conversions! 60 mile diameter disc. 188 mile circumference. 1000 rotations per second = 188 * 1000 miles / second = 188,000 miles/second Speed of light = 299 792 458 m / s = 186282 miles / second. The edge would be going faster than the speed of light; not allowed. Here is a fine and relevant ...


8

I was once where you are. I wondered if it was possible to create a rotating mirrored propeller capable of spinning fast enough to separate particle pairs in the quantum foam in a manner reminiscent of a Quantum Vacuum plasma thruster. The answer is no. The reason is material stress. Basically the maximum stress on a rotating solid disc (or arm) scales as ...


3

The only way the edge would spin with an angular velocity faster than the speed of light, is if the momentum from the centre (where I assume you're hypothetically applying the force) is transmitted instantaneously to the very edge. However, since there's no such thing as an instantaneous process in reality, there hypothetically needs to be some transmission (...


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