17

This might be possible, but it will take a large amount of time for this situation to develop. For the sake of this answer I will refer to both the town as well as their inhabitants as Caertydin and Siege. What I think is the most plausible explanation, is that the siege started out as a serious assault, but dragged out too long. Siege didn't cut off ...


12

Not Possible for several reasons: A well-run hierarchy ensures proper stewardship of resources, good morale, and unity of effort. A lack of hierarchy (or a poorly-run hierarchy) is likely to result in squandered or stolen resources, low morale (and consequent desertions), uncoordinated (and less-effective or wasted) efforts, and ultimately loss of the war ...


14

The Kingdom that founded Siege has collapsed so it can't officially declare an armistice. Siege don't want to publicly admit this. There is no King to declare an end to hostilities anymore. The people of Siege may think of their kingdom how early medieval Europe thought of the Roman empire: not willing to admit it's gone, occasionally getting behind ...


7

Gambling. The laws of Caertydin prohibit gambling in any form. When the siege wasn't going very well and was entering its second year residents of Caertydin slowly realised they could sneak out at night and go gamble in Siege, as their laws don't prohibit this. The soldiers in Siege let this happen because people from Caertydin aren't very good at poker. ...


6

It does not make economic sense Only 2,130 people have been killed by the coronavirus so far (Feb. 20), mostly in China. The economic cost of the virus looks to set China's growth for Q1 2020 back to as low as 3.5%, compared to 6.0% for Q1 2019. That's a loss of one-third of a trillion USD. Any savings from a few thousand elderly killed off will hence be ...


6

You cannot be explicit about your eugenics, but you can always set hiring conditions... You want to make werewolves into a private army. Hire them! Put out ads for Innocuous Security Company Incorporated; or maybe even the regular army. Then set a hefty wage, and watch the applications roll in. Now, only hire the most cooperative of them. The ones with the ...


5

In the real world, this experiment has been disastrous for the Anarchists, such as the POUM (Partido Obrero de Unificación Marxista), militias during the Spanish Civil War. The need for speed of action and unity of effort was constantly undercut by the desire of the members to debate every single decision. POUM propaganda poster OF course POUM had the ...


5

Targeting individuals by age is grossly inefficient. Only a primitive civilization is run primarily by manual labor, so the ability of individuals to provide manual labor is largely irrelevant, which means many older citizens are still contributing significantly. If your concern is healthcare expenditures then simply stop guaranteeing people infinite ...


6

The Land of Abundance So, the biggest issue with an eternal siege is going to be food, both in the city and for the army. So we take this away. Your city is valuable because it's located in a realm with an endless food supply, which also makes a siege a uselessly terrible strategy for taking the city, leading to the present situation. Note, you can replace ...


4

I'm pretty sure this could never actually work for a couple of reasons, namely that there are better ways to improve democracy and you'll never handle the security concerns. The security element of this is a nightmare in two directions. The first is that because it is so complex, there is little way to handle questions about the accountability of the ...


5

They simply forgot about it. Happens all the time. For example when the United Kingdom declared war on the Russian Empire, legend has it they included the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed in the war declaration but forgot about them in the peace treaty. (The historical facts don't appear to bear this out, unfortunately.) According to a story by George ...


4

There are examples of this, and even current-day movements to secede from the Australia's Federation. It is not inconceivable for what you suggest to happen. For some while, the Principality of the Hutt River was a self-declared state within a state, inside Western Australia, with a population of around 23 - and you can even visit it as a 'tourist ...


4

Breed a tiger into a cow. But as Rick Barrows at USDA pointed out, this is a question of perspective. "We can farm the tigers of the sea," he told me, "as long as we feed them hay."... And so we've reached a crossroads with salmon. Either we can invest money and effort into making a more and more artificial salmon, one whose very genetic ...


4

As long as there is no way that either of the countries can blame the other for the medical crisis, the unification process should naturally occur. Each side will have strengths that can help the other. Simultaneously, each side will have needs that the other can fill. As long as the leaders recognize the opportunity to end the animosity and are willing ...


4

A Printout of their Online History People can lie pretty damn easily on the spot, but it’s hard to keep up a facade of values over a long period of time. So you will provide a written record of their opinions and some behaviors that they’ve put out over the years. It wouldn’t just be Facebook and Twitter either, as part of the process the prospective ...


3

Ad hoc militia. The means of defence against foreign danger, have been always the instruments of tyranny at home. Among the Romans it was a standing maxim to excite a war, whenever a revolt was apprehended. Throughout all Europe, the armies kept up under the pretext of defending, have enslaved the people. - James Madison. In your scenario where ...


4

Siege reminds me to the situation of Calais (France) during the 15th century. The city had been conquered to the French in 1347 and until 1558 it served as an enclave in continental Europe for Britain. The city was called a "jewel" because it served as a trading port for wool, cloth, wine, lead and tin. In a way, it made the trading between French and ...


4

Previous King of whatever country had started the Siege was a rush, loud, warmongering, boasting type. Probably had a red beard. He had sworn a Holy Oath that if he can not capture Caertydin, he would step down and relinquish the crown. However, while the army was on the march, the King finally had to pay for all the years of drinking and reveling: he had a ...


2

If you suspect your child of being a mutant with powers and you cannot afford to hire Edna Mode for her services, you may have some problems. You are going to have to adjust as the kid grows and you pin down the powers a little better but there are places you can start. The first thing I would do is move way out into the middle of nowhere. Like Nevada, or ...


2

Depends on the setting of your story, novel, or game. In a realistic world, forget it. Australia is a stable democracy, recognized by the rest of the world community, and it won't be possible without their consent. As for getting that consent, see what happened when President Trump suggested buying Greenland. In a suitably cinematic world, start with ...


2

STOCK This may not be as democratic as you want but in companies the more stock you have the more voting power in the company you have. If the world is a mega corporation the company's miltary and tactics could be bought per-say. Example the miltary is a sub company or a branch and its stock is sold. The people with the most stock has the power. Purely ...


2

Depends on the size of the nation, if little like Vatican City it could do it very fast, if big like USA or Russia never. Actually the biggest problem is not the production of electricity but the transport of electricity. Even if your super reactor produces infinite energy at no cost, you can't transport for free. Most energy will be wasted over great ...


3

Ever heard of the Canadian- Danish war? There is an island(Hans Island.) both nations have a claim on. But the joke is the island is just a barren surface without any natural resources or population. Even going as far as the Danish planting their flag with a bottle of Schnapps and the Canadians returning the favor. So for your story, why did they even ...


2

Not only is this plausible, it's currently happening. Here's an article from today that describes exactly this kind of reconciliation in the face of a medical crisis. To summarize, China has never fully forgiven the atrocities committed by Japan during its 1937 invasion of China, and the relationship between the two countries remains strained to this day. ...


4

This kind of thing happens all the time in the real world. Take Paris and London for example. On the coast of France there is a little island called Britain. The people there have been at odds with the french for centuries. They did wage war at some point, but after the last one it's been centuries of peace. Fast forward to the 20th century. The french ...


1

The force which originally settled the town of Siege might have been an expeditionary force: Far from home and without a proper support line. A change in geography (volcanic eruption, earthquake, tidal wave, whatever) or a change in political borders made it impossible or extremely expensive for their original motherland to resupply or reinforce them and ...


1

Uneconomical. Health care systems require a lot of money and at the same time it is very difficult to monitor the expenses (except for regular salaries). There are a lot of grey areas where it is easy to skim part of the money. So older people which make the bulk of the expenses are useful for both, to keep the GDP high and to justify a type of spending ...


1

Crisis Reveals Character To establish the candidates' true nature, they must voluntarily submit to a combination endurance march, Military Survival Evasion Resistance Escape (SERE) trial, reality TV-style Survivor meets 'The Apprentice' and real-life Lost TV episode. Every moment is recorded and videoed as each of the candidates is faced with hunger, cold, ...


1

I think taking your question literally, the answer is a clear NO No government would do that (unless they were openly fascist or such). But of course, individual agents might do that, as long as the government can plausibly deny their involvement. About keeping a secret: Discrediting those who found out often works just as well as keeping things a secret......


1

They wouldn't need to "release" a virus that preferentially kills the elderly (and frail, and collaterally a relatively small number of children). All they need to do is "accidentally" release an influenza immunization for the season that is ineffective, or "improperly processed" in a way that actually produces the disease it's "intended" to combat. ...


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