36

Dutch started building dikes from the Iron age. The earliest indications of dike building date from the late Iron Age. During excavations of terps in the Frisian villages of Peins and Dongjum, among others, dike bodies were found – small dikes predating the building of the terp. These little dikes, no more than 70 cm high, were composed of neatly-stacked ...


19

You can't protect yourself from a danger you are not aware of. 1800's-level technology was totally ignorant of the risks related to radioactivity. Marie Curie (born 7 November 1867 – dead 4 July 1934), while researching on radium, used no protections against it, resulting in her notebooks being still radioactive today, and her coffin being lined with lead. ...


19

Hunting birds bring nearby food sources back to the airships Falcons for migrating birds Cormorants for fish Falconry is a Eurasian hunting method dating from the 13th Century BCE and well into the Late Medieval Period c. 1500 CE. The falcons fly out to catch small game and bring it back to the handler. In your scenario, each airship has one or more of ...


13

The Jawa Dam in Jordan dates back to about 3000 BC, is 80 metres long, 9 metres high, and consists of a 1 metre thick stone wall supported by a 50 metre wide earth rampart. the Great Dam of Marib in Yemen was 580 metres long and originally 4 metres high, built about 1700 BC. The Kallanai dam in Tamil Nadu, India, is constructed of unhewn stone, over 300 ...


11

However, a significant issue with this lifestyle presents itself: food. I like airships as much as the next person[1], but all the numbers involved in them are against your medieval society. Especially if "pastoral" and "nomadic" implies "poor", as shepherds traditionally are. Estimate a person at 150lbs, then a family of four ...


10

Human had Plumbum (Lead) for thousands of years, which can shield human body from most forms of radiation. The problem is knowing where to apply shielding: With regards to isotope poisoning: test unknown foods before consuming, by using materials which discolor in presence of radiation or organisms which will die of exposure. AFAIK, radiation will turn iron ...


10

Pastoralists Follow Herds Depending on the specific region of the aetherial seas you're looking at, Skyherd folk might follow any one of several great flockbeasts of the sky! In the warm lands of Irinsurea, skyherd folks follow after the air buffalo as they wander from current to current, wallowing in the warmdraughts of the midverticals. These creatures are ...


10

Submerge-proof an entire low-pan continent is not possible, unless: it's almost a desert-like one; or... ...your medieval population have a reliable source of power to pump all the flowing rivers on that continent against the height the raising ocean ...or both. Because, letting aside the sea seepage, I expect it will rain quite enough on a continent that ...


9

Other answers have stated that: a) the people at the time knew how to keep water at bay b) what pitfalls there are. What was done for many centuries in frisia (~ the coast of the north sea) was that villages were surrounded with dikes. I doubt that in medieval times you could actually coordinate all of the population of any given continent to build that wall ...


7

Aerial Trawling! Your pastoral airships often pass over large bodies of water - many wind patters hug the coasts of continents. When they're feeling hungry, drop the nets! Trawling nets can catch huge amounts of fish and other sea creatures, and fish (unlike migratory animals) are almost always a reliable source of food year-round near the coastlines. Your ...


6

(Assuming your okay with altering the world slightly) add some animals in the surrounding area to eat. Like various birds(or just increase their numbers in the area to make it work). Or change a few migrational behaviors and have those birds ALSO follow the wind, same as your airships (idk if they already do, some birds, I assume more often no). Also, make ...


5

They can follow/search for migrating birds and use them as food supply. Ducks and geese, for example, are already used by humans as food. They could stock on them when they get the chance, so to build storage for meager times. Together with that, when the winds bring them above the sea, they could throw nets or lines and fish. Last but not least, they could ...


5

The real problem is not building walls or dikes but to keep the land behind the dikes dry. A simple method is to use the tidal forces: Open up some gates when the tide is low and closing them at high tide. This can even be automated by the construction of the gates. This method can keep land dry that is approx. 1 m below average sea level. It works for small ...


5

If they are aware of the problem but don't have the technology, they can just follow the guidelines we have today for civilians, for survival after a nuclear war. Unless you have a high-tech bunker, you can't protect yourself from all the fallout. But you can reduce it, by focusing on the most important thing: keep dust away. There is nothing you can do ...


4

Trade And they could live as Kings. Trade was important in the Middle ages (specially in the second half). But it was hard, slow, and dangerous. Roads were poor, mountains, rivers, marshes, etc, were huge obstacles, make trade hard and dangerous. The Middle ages lacked good infrastructure. Being able to move through air means many natural obstacles aren't ...


3

Nomads Can Not Survive This Way The biggest problem with this scenario is that the nomads have no control over where they go. They could have a perfectly good method for feeding themselves in their preferred biome, but then get blown into a desert or mountain range or tundra and then all starve to death because their method of feeding themselves become ...


3

I actually have a scythe, and used it for scything grass. It is definitely not suitable as a weapon. The scythe has a curved blade. It is designed to slice grass off considering that it has mild resistance. Depending on the blade, it can cut through very THIN branches. It will NOT cut through bone. The blade is designed to push grass to the side as you ...


2

Don't build a seawall; raise the land. You mentioned "bowls of dry land" across the world, so I am envisioning your world consists of many archipelagos occupied by mostly seafaring civilizations. The problem with a seawall is that even absurdly high ones would occasionally get breached by a natural disaster (e.g. a hurricane surge, a tsunami, ...


1

There are several options depending on the tone you want to set. Attack the source. If the force field is being created by a person or object, disrupting or destroying the person or object creating the field could destroy the field. Attack the field. The field might be vulnerable from the outside to magical or kinetic attacks. Fireballs, beating on it ...


1

Detection is a form of protection. Knowing where the radiation is a big part of the problem. The Leyden jar was invented around 1745 and is an example the early investigations of electricity so that fits in with your time period. The gold leaves of the jar separate when charged up, (like charges repel) and when radiation enters the air in the jar, it ionizes ...


1

It depends how easily they can change elevation/land, and at what cost. Without effective propulsion they can still change direction by picking up different air streams moving in different directions at different levels, or land and take off for trading etc... but to do that they need to be able to change elevation cheaply and easily. That basically means ...


1

By Landing Unless I'm missing something, what is stopping your airship nomads from landing? Historic nomads followed wild herds or shepherded their own, and gathered wild produce from the land. This means moving mostly with the seasons- not every week, or necessarily every month. This also meant their movements were cyclical. Airships are good for travel, ...


1

A wall would not stop water infiltration through the ground There are many coastal areas below sea level because the sea currents deposited enough sand to create a barrier of dunes keeping out the sea. However those areas are usually marshland because the pressure of the sea eventually causes some water to seep through the ground. The Dutch solved the ...


1

There is a big-time advantage to hiring once-enemy mercenaries. If you do, they will be aware of some of the typical battle plans and strategies of your opponents, but you do need to be careful that they do not turn on you. And watch how much they tell you of your enemy's plans. If they spill the beans without demanding huge sums of money, they are ...


1

The only feasible thing to do is to unite several of the kingdoms through political manipulation (royal marriages, assassination and careful replacement of the monarch, etc, without making it clear that there is any connection between the countries. Then, stage a moment of weakness, perhaps attacking a kingdom that had not been conquered, or pretending to ...


1

Mathaddict's answer is completely out of touch with reality. First let us start with the fact that a human being requires 3 pounds of food per day and that a peasant is going to eat a one pound loaf of bread eat day. Let us wrongly assume a pound of grain yield a pound of flour and that yield a pound of bread. Ok, even if we look at wheat tortilla of 30 ...


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