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A Government Is Not A Single Unified Entity, Particularly Elected Governments Government priorities change over time, often swinging back and forth between different ends of a particular country's political range. Not every policy put in place under one administration is repealed under the next, even if that policy would not have been passed by the new ...


14

Old "divide et impera". As long as the two factions fight each other they will: depend on external suppliers of goods and services, in which the government can play a role and get an earning waste their resources in the mutual fight and not dedicate them to some other scope


12

They have the same exact goal that they are offering to potential funders: protection of humanity from supernatural entities. While their approach to achieving this and the philosophical outlook behind their decisions are entirely different this is not particularly important to the governments. First, they care about the result. Not the philosophy. ...


8

Why would a government support organizations with completely opposing goals? Because while the goals are philosophically in direct opposition, in practice their services are both necessary, even if neither side is willing to admit it, the government sees this. The GOC destroys objects they get their hands on that can be destroyed, and they're better about ...


6

is it reasonable to believe that innovation would be ground to a halt? Probably not. Necessity is the mother of innovation, that's how the saying goes. Apparently if these folks are not subjected to death, they apparently have no urge to innovate and improve their life. Why worrying about improving hygiene if even eating from your toilet bowl will not ...


6

For the same reason a very hierarchical structure like a military has subunits; simply stated, there are some things that having to go up the chain of command to the top to deal with will result in the top having to deal with so much unimportant crap they have to deal with that they can't deal with it all, let alone the higher-level things they should be ...


4

Set in in the UK or another country where gun crime is extremely uncommon. Carrying guns makes absolutely no sense for cyber-criminals in this country, and its hard to see what changing. Of course it's mainly legal factors, but culture comes into it as way. I don't think guns are going to go out of fashion in the US for a while, but in a future UK as ...


4

Yes why not Look at the Chinese in the 16th century. They said "we know enough" and ground innovation to a halt. This enabled the british victory in the opium war 19th century. Mid-20th century the Chinese woke up and started to catch up. Now, 21th century, they're back to their ancient status as leader of the world in many topics. I guess your alchemists ...


3

The government will support organisations with completely opposing goals because the electorate supports organisations with completely opposing goals. What a government cares most about is staying in power. To do this is needs to appeal to radically different demographics. How? It will face one set of voters and say "No-one cares more about protecting the ...


3

They Are Special Interests The two groups here more or less fit the definition of a special interest group. They have their own philosophy, and they push the government to align with their interests as much as possible. To a certain extent, the governments' interests will align with the interest groups', but it will rarely overlap entirely. Any ...


3

It would more likely accelerate technological progress, not halt it. Mortal rulers often become paranoid about being overthrown or assassinated; so, they inhibit the free proliferation of information that might cause society to shift away from thier favor. As long as most of your population is mortal, this inhibition of communication will lead to far more ...


3

Other than the Dragon, the setting has no fantastical elements (as far as humans know, there's only one dragon) and is more or less a carbon copy of high medieval Europe. In medieval Europe, dragons were typically seen as evil and malevolent beings on par with or analogous to demons. In christianity, Satan himself is called a "dragon" in the Book of ...


2

In Frank Herbert's Dune, everyone carries personal shields as well as having strong societal and political taboos against certain types of technology making their use suicidal for any faction large enough to actually get them. Thus a large range of weapons including ranged weapons such as nuclear missiles, artillery, guns, bombs, etc are universally unused ...


2

I'll call the army with the dragon Team Dragon and any army they are opposing Team Toasted. It's hard to imagine what poor public image Team Dragon could be concerned with. Warfare in this time frame was beyond brutal. Forces sieging a city would hurl carcasses -- animal or human -- over the walls with the hope of starting an epidemic. When bio-war is ...


2

The new government will still need local administrators. Might as well keep the previous administrations for that rather than invent new ones. People will like their local politicians after all, they wouldn't be happy to see them all replaced by people from other provinces. This is pretty much how the United States formed.


2

All but the smallest polities have nested subdivisions of some kind or name, with the number of levels of hierarchy depending on how large (in both area and population) the polity needs to scale. Typically the upper levels set policy and the lower levels implement it, but sometimes even policymaking is pushed down if there is a need (real or perceived) to ...


2

I see their society being completely stagnated. I can also see internal and external pressures that might drive technical development: 1) Rebels. People at the bottom rung (actual people, not bio-bots) rarely like being there regardless of how good that position is in the absolute sense. "Black market" alchemy/tech might be anything that allowed the low ...


2

It would be reasonable to suggest that innovation in the Alchemist's country overall would grind to a halt for a time. However, the immortal Alchemists that have conquered death will not necessarily sit on themselves and do nothing for eternity. The main matter is if these immortal alchemists can reproduce. A growing population, no matter how slow it does ...


2

The easiest way to defeat your enemy is to be the one leading it. Suppose the government wishes to, in fact, not contain, nor eradicate these dangerous anomalies. However, for some reason or another, the time to release them has not yet come. Suppose the people find out the government is hiding something and want to put a stop to it. In order to ensure ...


1

A few possible explanations: Ambiguity: The government does not recognise the key philosophical differences between GOC and SCP. This may be especially the case if the SCP is fine with killing the supernatural in self-defence, which may occur regularly if the SCP are constantly in contact with the supernatural. This could lead to the government labeling the ...


1

The government is not monolithic. Powerful donors back both groups. Both the GOC and SCP work to get their own politicians in places of power. The politicians may or may not care one way or the other, but need someone to back them, and need an enemy to run against. The more cynical outlook. The powerful donors are all in collusion. By supporting both ...


1

You might want to see the answers to this similar question: Provinces, what are their practical purposes?1 And you might want to see this list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_administrative_divisions_by_country2 It lists levels of administrative divisions for each country in the world. And for each country an expert in its government could ...


1

Your question is similar to a central plot point in the Mistborn trilogy by Brandon Sanderson. I'm not spoiling anything when I say that the premise is an immortal tyrant has united the whole of the known world and kept it's technology and culture in a static and unchanging state for over ten centuries in order to maintain control, deliberately ensuring ...


1

Span of control. It is difficult if not impossible to manage too many people. It is very common to set up intermediate levels of government. For example in the United States we have federal, state, county (or parish for Louisiana), and usually town or city. The federal government sets broad guidelines for education, the state sets more specific policies, but ...


1

There are good reasons to have counties. France has four levels of counties. Germany has three levels of counties. China has many districts, many of which even have diverging policies about the economy (!) Even the Soviets back in their heyday had still things like "the Ukraine" which should decide "local" things. The central government doesn't want to ...


1

In Neal Stephenson's cyberpunk novel Snow Crash, gun regulation and metal detectors are ubiquitous - hence the antagonist uses weaponry made of glass to murder people. Law enforcement is made through the usage of robotic dogs that move so fast as to be practically invisible. They are so efficient that anyone once deployed anyone with a gun on their hand ...


1

The point of steampunk usually seems centered on the absence of proper combustion mechanics or materials, but has a disproportionate amount of power in steam engines. Imagine if you dont have explosive material that can push a bullet, shell or canonball without destroying the weapon itself (lets say all explosives are also corrosive and limit guns to only a ...


1

Who controls the spice dragon, controls the universe. The political troubles you have aren't going to be external. As usual, the threat is inside. The dragon represents a lot of concentrated military, and therefore political, power that resides more or less solely in its handlers. If they tell it to eat the king, will it do it? As the king, do you believe ...


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