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I'm designing a gas giant for my solar system with a mass close to that of Jupiter (around 315 Earth masses). Now I wanted my gas giant to be mostly brown but also with purple colored stripes and spots. My idea was that the planet would be mostly made of hydrogen and helium but would also have a large amount of Argon in its atmosphere. Gas giant are known to have huge storms in their clouds and from what I've read Argon appears purple when electrically charged. Now my question is:

"Is this planet possible?"

Specifically, how much Argon should there be in order to be visible, in precentage? Also where would Argon be most concentrated? At the gas giant's belts (where gasses sink) or its zones (where gases rise)?

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    $\begingroup$ For comparison, Jupiter is made mostly from Helium and Hydrogen. Some of the visible bands on Jupiter are made of sulfur and phosphorous clouds that rose from much deeper within. Argon is just a tad denser than those two, so it seems reasonable that it could rise to the surface due to similar causes. As for glowing purple, it is difficult to have a medium that has a sustained disparity of charges, because oppositely charged particles attract. Gas is somewhat poorly suited for staying charged, since the molecules can move freely around. $\endgroup$
    – Jafego
    Nov 12, 2022 at 7:28
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    $\begingroup$ @Jafego comments are for seeking clarifications and pointing out issues with the question, I suggest that you post what you have - possibly expanded somewhat - as an answer instead $\endgroup$ Nov 12, 2022 at 7:37
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    $\begingroup$ @KerrAvon2055 I didn't want to post as an answer since I was just sharing a couple of thoughts. I don't feel that I have enough expertise in Astronomy and the other relavant sciences to answer with a high degree of confidence or in depth. $\endgroup$
    – Jafego
    Nov 12, 2022 at 7:39

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Argon appears purple when electrically charged.

No, argon emits purple light when a current is flowing through it, not when it's just charged

enter image description here

And gas discharge doesn't happen in any condition, the pressure must be low enough to allow the charge carrier getting enough energy to ionize the gas.

You would then get purple light only when lighting are striking, or higher up in the atmosphere where something similar to northern lights might happen.

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