FoxElemental
  • Member for 3 years, 9 months
  • Last seen more than 2 years ago
  • On the computer at a desk . . duh.
Is life viable on a split Earth?
13 votes

Probably not. If the halves were dome-shaped, then gravity would try to shift it down into an orb, causing catastrophic events, landslides, etc. Everything would be pulled to the middle. Even if the ...

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Living biological boats? (Jasconius)
7 votes

Hmm. A boat would have a curved upwards shape. As for avoiding depth . . . Avoiding predators. It requires gaseous O2 to survive (lungs, booklungs, or tracheae instead of gills) And the most ...

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How much energy would be released in a collision of planets of matter & antimatter?
4 votes

The Earth weighs $5.972\cdot10^{27}$ grams. One gram of antimatter equals $42.96 \cdot 4.184\cdot10^{12}$ Joules ($1.7974464 \cdot 10^{14}$ Joules.) $1.7974464 \cdot 10^{14} \cdot 5.972\cdot10^{27}$ ...

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Dragon breathing gas-based flame (fireballs?)
3 votes

Use electrolysis, or some other form of splitting water (plants do this with chlorophyll and sunlight)--have the dragon have a specific organ (a fuel storage bladder), and then use the hydrogen gas as ...

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How much energy would be required to vaporise a giant reptilian monster?
Accepted answer
2 votes

According to this source, the energy needed to vaporize the human body (leaving skeleton) is 1.42 $\times$ 10$^8$ Joules, or the equivalent of 28 kg of TNT. The density of a human is 985 kg/m³. 75840 ...

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Creating a scientifically semi-valid super-soldier, part 3: Physical shock resistance
1 votes

You need to convert kinetic energy to heat energy (essentially creating a shock absorber.) Interestingly enough, your bones are pretty good at this already because of the collagen braids reinforced ...

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Are nuclear-propelled shotgun slugs viable?
1 votes

Simply put, no. In a vacuum (space) there is no atmosphere. This means that, although the radiation dose would be higher, the blast (shockwave) would disappear, and the slugs wouldn't whip through ...

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At what point in history would it be feasible to build Archimedes famous Death Ray?
1 votes

Some solutions: Use warped convex glass lens instead--ever fried a leaf with a magnifiying glass? If you used a lens large enough, it could set fire to something. As for timing: Quite early--types of ...

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What type of weapon makes the most sense for use on a spaceship
1 votes

If there's gravity: Chemical weapons like poison gases would work. Energy guns that relied on low-level nervous system disrupting shocks might work as well. Perhaps some sort of kinetic-energy blast. ...

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What is the quickest way to perfect global warming?
0 votes

Freeze Earth's core! Now there's some radiation hitting us and the atmosphere is stripped away as our ozone is depleted ('cuz of the new anti-environmental laws pouring CFC's into the air) even more ...

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A cure, a vaccine, and one tricky disease
Accepted answer
0 votes

Thank you for your feedback, everyone. I decided to combine all of this into a canonical answer as a community post to be fair. Karl Justice said: "I note that you said the bacteria ALL change ...

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On a frozen world, what would be the thinnest, warmest materials to make clothing from?
0 votes

Use an aerogel. They're superlightweight (90% air) and very insulating. This is a Wikipedia article on aerogels. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerogel Cork is also good at insulating and natural. If ...

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What weapon of mass destruction could theoretically vaporize a whole solar system?
0 votes

Use iron to make the star die. Iron is unique--when it's created, it begins the countdown to the star's death. With hydrogen, helium, lithium, etc., the star can still use nuclear fusion to create ...

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What is a good way to store hydrogen?
0 votes

Hydrogen can be stored in two ways: As a compressed gas in high-pressure tanks (beware, highly flammable!) As a superliquid (the catch is it has to be at around -260 degrees Celsius, so you'd be ...

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Why would life on a different planet use DNA?
-1 votes

I can't say for sure, but the DNA/RNA system works wonderfully well. RNA might be better for simplicity. Think about it: Each three-base pair codon codes for a specific amino acid (although some ...

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