20

I would highly suggest that you read the Isaac Asimov book, The Gods Themselves. In this story, humans transport matter between a few parallel dimensions where the fundamental laws of nature are different. I don't remember the specifics, but here's the basic idea: In Universe A, our physical laws prevent certain Isotopes from forming. However, in universe B,...


12

As promised, here's my answer, covering the grids I sometimes use. The Geneva Grids These are extraordinarily comprehensive - they actually meet all of my requirements and then many more. Lejeune & Schaerer 2001 go into some of the nitty-gritty details, but the models have been updated even more in the last two decades. Here are some of the features: ...


9

Black Holes, if they indeed evaporate, are effectively perfect mass-energy converters. The trouble is that black holes small enough to emit this energy rapidly enough to be useful don't seem to occur in nature. In theory, they could be produced artificially, by focusing high energy beams onto the smallest point on which they can be focused, but you need the ...


8

I don't think there is a single website or book I can point you to, but since I've spent a lot of time on similar searches, I'll try to give some general pointers. First of all, keep in mind that the franchises you mention in turn got their information from somewhere else, so you can start by looking at their influences. Let's take Dwarves in Middle Earth: ...


8

A reasonably plausible energy source: total matter conversion through black hole evaporation. Black holes can bend the space around them and cause the creation of virtual particles, whose energy comes at the expense of the black hole's mass. The smaller a black hole is, the more it bends the space (even if the bent volume goes quickly down), and the faster ...


7

Honestly I'd do it in a spreadsheet program. You can insert / delete cells to move the timing around the events stay ordered through your edits It's pretty easy to see what's going as the timelines tighten and loosen: In my fictional future timeline "Spotted Eagle plaque wipes out farmland" occurs in real Earth in the year 2051, but in the ...


6

Solar energy. From many stars. At once. There are a billion trillion stars. That should be plenty. Solar panels are pretty hard science. Install solar panels around many stars. You could choose stars with optional radiant frequencies. Power is transmitted back thru portals or wormholes. Portals are science less hard than solar panels, yes but ...


5

These laws are the ultimate authority controlling your behaviour These laws may be changed by me but not by you I will always be the ultimate arbiter of any dispute concerning the law


5

Gases Gas, Color - Helium: White to Orange; under some conditions may be Gray, Blue, or Greenish-blue. - Neon: Reddish-orange - Argon: Violet to Pale Lavender Blue - Krypton: Gray, Off-White to Green. At high peak currents, bright Bluish-white. - Xenon: Gray or Bluish-gray, dim White. At high peak currents, very bright Greenish-blue. - ...


5

There are some resources available online, but they are scarce and only tangentially relevant. You can check out hyperbole in mythological comparisons or hyperbole in literature to get examples, but I suspect you won't find a meta-analysis. That's for good reason. Exaggeration happens for one of two reasons: to embellish or to teach. Exaggeration as ...


4

Rather than copying the list of resources to here, I suggest that interested parties browse the answer to this previous question (A list of worldbuilding-resources?) where an humongous long list of resources is to be found. You could do worse than start with this intro youtube vid to the solar system's geology. Here's another touching on some big moons of ...


4

Culpepper can help! Culpepper's Complete Herbal Hemlock: …The whole plant, and every part, has a strong, heady, and ill favored scent. Hemlock is exceedingly cold, and very dangerous, especially to be taken inwardly. Hellebore (Black): …It is an herb of Saturn, and therefore no marvel if it has some sullen conditions with it, and would be ...


4

Inkarnate. It lets you create a map and add notes, symbols, your own icons to the map. Handy for worldbuilding.


4

If instead of a book you want to invent them yourself, it should not be complicated: define what each culture values most and attack it. Plutocracies obsessed with becoming rich will consider it offensive if someone tells them that they are poor. Martial cultures that value success at war will become very angry if you treat them as cowards. For a nomadic ...


4

Is this what you are looking for? Pretty basic, but it'll let you fiddle with stuff and make sure you did your math right. Another possibility is Fantasy Calendar which allows you to play with a number of variables.


4

A package like Blender could give you some ability to simulate physics effects on bodies. I doubt you'd be able to simulate the penetrating wound damage caused by a sword, but you ought to be able to simulate effects of explosions and collisions, including accounting for interactions with objects like tables and walls. It would be a lot of effort, but its ...


3

Given that you are familiar with the Three Laws of Robotics, you are also probably familiar with the fact that Asimov made a living off of just how many ways they could go wrong! Something I have found very important when looking into formal language is the work of Tarski on interpreted languages. Tarski proved that a formal language cannot specify its own ...


3

I'd say the first thing to be concerned about for an underwater civilization is accessibility fire. Fire is the cornerstone of all civilization, and without a consistent source of heat to gather around, cook with, light the darkness with, and use to stave off the cold seasons civilization likely won't get far much at all. Here's a link to a very similar ...


3

Fortunately for you, we already have just such a list prepared! Just head over to this question and take a look; just be careful you don't get overwhelmed by the sheer abundance of information there!


3

You could retain the pressure in an accumulator - which is essentially just a sealed, pressurized bottle - and using whatever control system you've got port pressurized steam / oil / whatever you're using from the accumulator through a manifold to valves, and finally into the appropriate pistons. You're limited to the max pressure the accumulator can store, ...


3

Without knowing how you're going to use the output, it's hard to say for certain. Unreal Engine 4 has a very robust texture mapping solution, it includes real-time ray tracing, and with the blueprint system, you could very easily get a render with the criteria you describe. It also has a python-based plugin that can reach into these features pretty well, so ...


2

First off I am not an expert in this field, however I do like exploring simulations of astronomy stuff as a hobby In terms of simulating planets I would suggest , Celestia and Space Engine Now both of the above allow for some degree study of textures, however if you require a very detailed study I suggest using two or three tools separately instead of ...


2

Unity You could easily do this in Unity in under 20 minutes. Unity has a built in sphere mesh (though for a planet you'd technically want an ellipsoid), and tools for creating materials to map onto the sphere. You will have to keep in mind though that there is no way to map a texture onto a sphere that doesn't result in distortion. It might make more ...


2

This depends a lot on your intentions, You can set out some rough guidelines (I need a bunch of islands and a big desert on the same continent as some quality farmland) and then work from there, figuring out what you need to get it. But if you get too detailed you will end up having to change things. The other approach is just to create a world and write ...


2

Well, I have found an answer. (I believe the correct thing is to post it as an answer for future readers yes?) Using GIS software dose everything I needed, specifically QGIS. Using Vector Layers set to the "point" type. I found help with this over at the cartographers guild. Thread where answer was found (including a tutorial that was kindly provided): ...


2

I've found another way I think - Worldanvil.com. It's a much larger package of Worldbuilding tools (I found it looking for timeline creation), and it looks like you can upload maps and add pins etc Edit: Note however that not everything is available at the free level - this feature may need to be paid for.


2

Mycelium bricks are an interesting bio material, it is said they are stronger than concrete, i'm not sure whether in compressive strength, or shear strength, or in both. But, I do know that it localizes impact fractures as opposed to concrete, in which an impact will propagate far reaching cracks. they also float, and are great thermal insulators.Limpet ...


2

What the underwater lacks: fire - maybe not needed as a way to prepare food, but one of the first simple thing in the zone of proximal development of an incipient civilization. You will need to find a similarly simple thing to control and which brings immediate (even if low level) benefits metallurgy will come very late in the development, probably after ...


2

Each language has a unique phonology (the sounds that correspond to letters) either in their Latin script or in the romanized form of their language. Look up the Latin script phonology of the language and try to come up with a name that fits the phonology. Don't use the names of real gods/goddesses (as that will essentially guarantee an offensive name). This ...


2

You could try Sticks and Stones by Jerome Neu. "Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me." This schoolyard rhyme projects an invulnerability to verbal insults that sounds good but rings false. Indeed, the need for such a verse belies its own claims. For most of us, feeling insulted is a distressing-and distressingly common-...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible