New answers tagged

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Morality Just because you can, doesn't mean you should. It's morally wrong to kill humanity to save the planet. Furthermore, not all humans are evil. A lot of humans care about the environment and do their part in keeping the planet healthy.


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Because "living beings, that are older than any other being on earth" is pretty long, I will just call them "elders". Do you have an idea, what the elders actually are? Are they physical or are they some kind of spirit? Where do they live (in the oceans, on land, on mountains, inside the earth etc.)? Do they have any restrictions, for example they die in ...


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Because they would kill (or strongly affect) a part of yourself. With their ability to feel such a things (beyond the perception of humankind) as the planet emotions, they also are affected with such a brutal act as killing other living being and no one is willing to undergo that. PS: is this Cameron's Avatar? :)


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Politics and bureaucracy They’ve got some odd political power plays going on. As a result of this some things are expressly forbidden and others expressly required. This makes killing off humanity without breaking any of the rules... tricky. Think of it like this: a patient has a disease that might kill them. The drugs to kill off the disease exist, but ...


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One could try to argue that Rome failed because the political system did not keep up with the size. Electing co-equal magistrates for a year, sending ex-magistrates to govern provinces, the whole tax-farming principle, making troops dependent on their general for a decent retirement, all that could have been modified. Make every resident who meets the ...


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Adapt Human Technology and Solve Problems I would start with your aliens and a general human tech level equivalent. Your species will at least need to be able to create tools, so we know they are intelligent and have appendages with precise dexterity for creating tools. Example I am going to build a modern society with human sized dragons. They have wings ...


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Well, I guess I'll just use the same kind of answer as last time. Step 1: Assume they aren't going to be that different. Both the 'basically-human' aliens and the 'Cthullu-esque uncomprehensible' aliens are fun tropes to play around in science fiction. The truth, unfortunately, is that the probability favors the former far more than the latter, especially ...


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I think a way to achieve a generic processes to design alien commodities or items, is designing a list of generic questions we can answer, and having some considerations about each question to make it easier to answer. Ok now, let's try find the right questions: How did the species get the intelligence to produce tools? Evolution is not random at all, ...


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It will obviously vary by time period, culture and the effectiveness of law enforcement. For historical perspective, the non-fiction book Gangs of New York describes the gang activity around 1900 up to the prohibition era New York in the 1920s. (The 2002 movie of the same name used this book as source material.) The book lists 42 organized gangs and a number ...


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This is impossible to know for sure, but you can do some estimations So we we are going to treat is like a Fermi problem, and do some broad estimations and hopefully end up in an order of magnitude of the correct answer. Depending on your world, you can change any of these numbers to tweak your answer. For the ease of math, we will start with a city with ...


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If there is a vast empire in your world, the outer provinces may face invasions and raids, but the inner provinces may have peace. The medieval era lasted for about 1,000, and during that period there were a number of vast empires in Asia, Africa, and Europe, which peace lasting for decades or centuries in large regions. As for wars between large ...


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While mentioned by Flox "trade" is a reasonable answer, as high level of trade seems to be precluded by the question, I can think about a less idealistic reason: Huge natural border: makes the demarcation line quite uncontroversial because of power projection limitations makes any huge invasion unlikely (good luck in crossing mountains/desert/sea, in ...


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Trade, if a primary concern, is a form of peace You mention they do trade. One could argue that international trade is one of the major (if not primary) factors that prevents military conflict, or at least makes it unpalatable enough to think twice. Trade comes with benefits: Dependancy on each other Constant communication between nations Trade agreements,...


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I want my story to be science-based. I want there to be technical jargon that goes over most people's heads (the average Joe shouldn't question it). Why? I ask this not to discourage you or to be pedantic, but rather because I think your answer to that question will guide you in your next steps. I don't think there's a single right answer to the conundrum ...


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For the bonus points: "I want there to be technical jargon that goes over most people's heads." To avoid the problems this causes, just don't do it. There is always someones head you just can't reach over, and almost all your readers will know a bit more then about something then you do, at which point your jargon risks becoming BS that will date and grate. ...


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There is no royal road "How can I break down the task of resolving science-based issues into manageable chunks?" There is really only one way to do it: learn how the world works, so that you know more about how the world works than your readers do. ("Readers" can be watchers, listeners, players and so on. The people to whom you are telling the story.) Note ...


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It doesn't have to be rigorous, it just needs to be plausible and consistent. First you have to decide how hard your sci-fi is going to be, the harder it is the more rigorous it has to be and the more research you are going to have to do, at a certain point you reach diminishing returns because you can't know enough (literally, no one human can keep up with ...


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Just as with your previous questions, I'm going to provide an answer that is unlike what you wanted or expected, but which I think is what you need to hear. Take, for example, this question: Interstellar war tactics with no FTL capabilities? The author wishes to use quantum entanglement to allow for FTL communication. Quantum entanglement cannot be used ...


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Step 1: Decide how scientific you want to be There are three general levels of science fiction. 'Soft', 'medium', and 'hard'. Soft science fiction is science fictiong that doesn't even want to try and justifies everything with either new materials that aren't explained or new fields of science that aren't explained. A great example of something which is ...


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Don't sweat it. You don't need to be rigorous, you just need to be plausible. Some things on your list, yes I would eliminate as they are written. (I skimmed...) E.g. Plate tectonics -- look at plate boundaries, ring of fire, subduction zones, mid oceanic ridges and mountain ranges now on earth, file off the serial numbers. E.g. A moon at the L1 point ...


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Start from the mechanism I'm a devout adherent to Sanderson's Laws of Magic, named after fantasy author Brandon Sanderson. All three of these principles are much easier to achieve if you start by defining the thing you want to change about the physics, geography, geology or whatever, of our universe to get your fantasy universe, and then work forward from ...


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