7

The story should be relevant to us as people, it's setting could be as wild as you want (wilder the better) as long as it's self consistent as you say. The key in your question in my view is 'self-consistent'. You could create a world out of a single idea and this leads you to unforeseen results. The story then comes out of this setting, and as long as its ...


4

Maps, languages and other world-building isnt a requirement, and can in fact be a point of annoyance for the readers. Having some aes mokdai (local dragon lord) who uses his G'radhid Talons (a type of magical spear) in the Habdabib ceremony (important to celebrate the Jastran season halfway through winter) in the city of Urdal (a smaller regional city in the ...


4

You don't need to make up languages. Most works just ignore the problem. This is commonly referred to as Translation Convention. You can do the same for people and place names. Sure, your character's real name is ᡂꛡࡁߚ, but we'll just call him "Bob". (If you like, you can mention that you're doing this.) Another approach, which is fairly common¹, is to use "...


4

There is a reason why one of the commonly cited pieces of advice to authors is murder your darlings. I know it can feel irritating to feel like you're throwing away work, but while it can be extremely fun to think about interesting worldbuilding, it never sells a story on its own. You should also include less of what you use than you think. As a writer, ...


3

For every published story there are probably a dozen authors with the same story who spent 20 years worldbuilding instead of actually writing but we’ll never get to hear their names because they’re still too busy fantasising over maps and characters backstories (I love drawing maps!!!). Be brave, bite the bullet, start writing. Only then will you know.


2

Ground your weird with the familiar. @JustSnilloc - has a good example with Wonderland; it is trippy and surreal, but the reader is grounded by Alice and her ordinary perceptions and reactions. Riddley Walker is written in a very difficult future patois but the world it describes is not that bizarre. Kafka's Metamorphosis has one super weird element, and ...


2

Team up with a buddy. Hollow Knight is one of my favorite works of literature in the form of a videogame. Team Cherry made it by having the original creators focus on mechanics and design only. The two of them added the names, backstory and context later. It ended up being a beautiful mythology. When Valve developed Half-Life 2 and Portal 2, they their ...


1

Yes. Thinking and doing draft and plot what plot writing sessions basically you are feeling out the world it's functions, its layout when you just write it plop your characters into what you think is the world then see if it still is that. I don't do maps, I do clothing design, I don't design buildings I search pintrest and Deviant art for inspirtations or ...


1

One thing to do is draw a different type of map. If your story is set the way too popular fantasy society based on feudal Europe, why not show makes of Feudalism? You could have one map that shows the kingdoms in a region, and then another map showing the dukedoms that each kingdom is divided into, and a third map showing the countships that each duchy in ...


1

Write some investigative scenes... Imagine your protagonist back when they are middle school age and write a scene in which they are making a presentation to their class. In their own voice, have them tell the class about a particular historic event and how it influenced all that came later. Imagine your protagonist's love interest at a coming of age ...


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