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2

Energy is mainly provided by nuclear fusion with helium 3 mined on place Moon-encircling superconducting powerlines mean that everyone can use solar, even in the dark bits. Solar power satellites are also a possibility, if you're not into megascale engineering (and if you're not, why are you trying to terraform the moon?) A thick, breathable atmosphere, ...


2

waste heat is converted into energy as well Thermodynamic forbids you this, after a certain point. If you dump to the cold side of space that point is pretty low, though An artificial magnetic field (AI is my cheap answer on that, too), to keep radiation and other space threats at bay. No magnetic field is going to protect you from UV, X and gamma rays, ...


1

I think it would be very hard to make the atmosphere as dense as it is on Earth, because the Moon has low gravity. And you should take into account that even on Earth you can freeze to death but only on some places or in specific season. On the Moon there will be better and worse regions to live, too. The temperature on the Earth scales from around -90 to +...


6

What I'm looking for is a plausible estimate. Would one freeze to death during night time for example, or would a temperature drop to "a slight chill" be believable. Obvious answer: do you want people to freeze to death? Then fine: they freeze to death overnight. Personally, I'd rather not. The long nights are obviously problematic in this regard, ...


1

To use an overused term, "Technically" forever. We need light in the short term due to our overuse of it. Most of any population would die off after a few years due to all forms of organic resources becoming less available. We don't rely one hundred percent on sunlight to live, mainly to stay healthy we need sunlight. A stable food source would be the ...


2

your description look exacly like krakatoa and tambora eruption. https://www.livescience.com/28186-krakatoa.html The explosions hurled an estimated 11 cubic miles (45 cubic km) of debris into the atmosphere, darkening skies up to 275 miles (442 km) from the volcano. In the immediate vicinity, the dawn did not return for three days. Ash fell as far away ...


3

13-days night won't destroy the civilization. But a multiyear winter may do that. Medieval civilization did not have much dependency on trade or technology. Long night event may cause widespread panic and rioting, and ruling dynasties may be toppled - but so what? After day-night cycle returns to normal, so would the people. Burned houses would be rebuilt, ...


3

Put your place between the ocean and a mountain range. Wet air coming in from the ocean tends to dump its water on the ocean side of the mountains. You get a climate like Portland or Seattle. Put your place far enough north that it gets cold. Then the wet air dumping water will come down as snow. Possibly a lot of snow. The ocean will prevent it from ...


3

Ursula K. LeGuin does a good job with this kind of environment in "The Left Hand of Darkness". Direct sunlight isn't needed, so long as there is enough radiant energy to grow some kind of crops, or to support a sufficient amount of wildlife for a hunter/gatherer society to live off of. A sunny region can produce 600 calories per square centimeter of arable ...


5

There's one part of a dome that people always seem to forget about, and that's the bottom. In order for a dome habitat to be viable on, say the Moon or Mars, it must be completely sealed off from the outside, because outside is the vacuum of space, or a thin, mostly-methane atmosphere. The problem is, the surface of any rocky planet is going to be a lot of ...


9

Why is the dome the best solution? Think about the original designers of the dome - why have it? An answer to this question may answer your question. The only reason to have a dome is to be on the surface of a planet, otherwise you might as well be underground in a large protected cavern. But why risk being on the surface of a planet? The only real reason ...


5

It depends on the properties of the dome. Heat can move 3 ways: conduction, convection and radiation. Conduction is through a solid - like a frying pan. Convection is via fluid medium like air. Radiation does not require a medium and moves via electromagnetic rays. A dome means no convection: air does not go thru a dome. Radiation and conduction are ...


7

dome to have it's own self-regulating ecosystem Since the dome has its own self-regulation, there should be no impact of external climatic phenomena in general. However, effect of external climate can at times be aggravated in terms of extreme events like cyclones, floods, heatwaves etc, which can impact the efficacy of the self-regulation system your dome ...


3

According to your rules, no effect, though the dome needs to be tough enough to withstand the weather in the first place, otherwise the dome stops being a dome and the interior is now fully exposed. And with that out of the way, the only problem is temperature exchange. Except your dome is massive - it'd have to be to get clouds, which you want, and it ...


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