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Pangaea. Evidence suggests the super-continent had extensive deserts in the interior with temperatures reaching up to 45C. This was because moisture precipitated out of he atmosphere before reaching the central regions of the continent. Other factors including latitude of specific parts of the continent and then prevailing environmental conditions helped. I ...


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On Earth due to the near Moon have an influence on tidals that attract a big mass of water (oceans and seas), but thet gravitational fields of the Earth it is own, for calculating a celestial body's surface gravity g=G*(M/R²) g= surface gravity G= gravitaional costant (6,67×10⁻¹¹ N m²/kg²) R²=square of the planet radious Earth have 9,8 m/s² Moon have 1.62 m/...


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If you could create ideal conditions, then it would be theoretically possible. The water doesn't come from the area where it is raining. So if you can have winds constantly bringing in clouds from the sea, and geological features and climate which causes the rain to condense from the clouds in the given area, then you would have permanent rain. The rain ...


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Permanent fog How about a different approach? Reduce the pressure of the atmosphere. In lower atmosphere, water boils at much lower temperatures. This will also increase the evaporation at temperatures lower than the boiling point. This causes the oceans to have a near permanent layer of fog, interspersed with rain if I'm not mistaken. Still, there would be ...


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A asteroid the size of Greenland, made entirely of loosely packed chunks of ice, in a decaying elliptical orbit. Every few weeks or so, it brushes past the upper atmosphere and thousands of ~1m fragments break off. Those fragments burn up entirely in the atmosphere, increasing global humidity. This would also accelerate global warming - water vapour is a ...


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500km/hr wind on it's own would not destroy a well built reinforced building. But the wind can bring 3 things which can: Projectiles. This paper describes the structural damage from a car hitting reinforced concrete pillars at 40km/hr. (The column gets a sheer fracture). Scaling this up to tornado speeds and a few lucky impacts with flying cars into ...


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Increase the atmospheric CO2. As others have mentioned, the cretaceous and paleocene are believed to have had a climate exactly as you mentioned. These are known as equable climates, where the average temperature does not change much from the equator to the poles. The driving force behind this are hadley cells. This page explains how the cretaceous may have ...


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The location of the today's climate zones are driven by the 3 cell Hadley-Ferrel-Polar atmospheric circulation system. It's not actually known when Earth first developed this 3 cell atmospheric circulation system. If I recall correctly, there is a theory that the current 3 cell system came about when the Antarctic circumpolar current was established after ...


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The Holocene climatic optimum around 11-8 thousand years ago, average temperatures in the "Temperate zone" was 2-4 degrees warmer so the "Sub-tropical" zones of those areas naturally extended


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A thicker, denser atmosphere. From what I understand, you could solve this problem with a thicker atmosphere. The thinner an atmosphere is, the more extreme the temperature variation is. Particularly between light and dark areas. The extra air tends to have a certain thermal inertia. Mars is a little chilly, but not unbearable at equatorial latitudes, but ...


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