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2

However, the only feasible part I ask is if it is possible to have a bomb energetic enough to cause oxygen and nitrogen fusion at all, which should already be destructive enough on its own, and is satisfying enough for me. Nope. I mean, it isn't forbidden by physics, but like so many other things that aren't technically impossible the engineering of such ...


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You may need to replace Hydrogen with a more electropositive ion. You can go ahead and use sodium, and for a more dramatic effect, even Caesium. Those materials react spontaneously with the water and become so positively charged that the atoms have gained sufficient charge to repel each other and the chunk of Caesium flies apart, literally. The phenomena ...


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There are two major problems with this weapon. (And pretty much any "I'm going to do fancy things to these molecules" weapons that don't end up involving fusion.) Problem 1 is the energy required. Think of the protons (that's what hydrogen ions are, bare protons) as a spring. If they're just sitting there, they won't have any kind of repulsive force. You ...


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It works, but... Here's the thing. Energy isn't free. Yes, technically, if you gather a bunch of hydrogen ions (or protons, really) together, than the electric force will repel the protons at near relativistic speed (though probably never exceeding it, thanks to general relativity, according to XKCD). Assuming you've got enough of them, of course. That ...


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At first, it may seem crazy, but yes. Alexander Bolonkin seems to have an idea on how to do this: http://vixra.org/pdf/1309.0200v1.pdf


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As stated from the person above, it would seem that the Wunderland Treatymaker would not work, but the effects could be obtained from a large-area electron capture effect. The new question is what beam could trigger such an effect.


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Within the realm of science as we understand it, it's completely impossible. Electrical charge is a fundamental attribute of the electron; the only way to remove the charge is to change the particle into something else. The overall reaction, though, is possible: it's just electron capture spread out over a large area rather than confined to the insides of ...


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