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30

Food. Animals that big need a lot of calories. Maybe giants eat huge quantities of plant material like elephants. Even elephants prefer crop plants like corn and melons over grass and bark. A giant can do more work than a team of horses. Employ them to do agriculture. Pay them with funds they can use to buy the huge quantities of food and beer they ...


18

Yes, it's called the Macedonian Phalanx Their main weapon was a giant spear 18ft long, which took them special training to be able to use. The rest of their normal kit was a shortsword and shield, so swap out the shortsword for a short-spear, and you're good. Add in some heavy cavalry on the side in armor and lances. These soldiers were how Alexander the ...


11

Drugs Giants get hooked on drugs more readily than humans due to a neurological quirk, although you still need a pretty big dose. So you get your giants addicted to opium, which you import from a separate region as to prevent them from just taking it from you. Giants have a very hard time beating addictions because they’re so used to always getting their ...


10

Worked for the Zulu Shaka was credited for the invention of the Iklwa which was a short stabbing spear The Zulu would start combat by throwing a traditional spear before engaging in hand to hand combat with the Iklwa. The Zulu army armed with spears was a credible threat against the English army armed with guns. See Anglo-Zulu War Spears don't need to be ...


9

how big their baby is ? i think a method to tame elephant can be use here, basically catch the infant put them in chain or shackle and tame them or brainwash them in the process. when they grow they probably wont even realize that they can remove the shackle easily and can be manipulate easily. here some copy paste from http://www.stevescottsite.com/how-...


7

With skin that thick they've got no manual dexterity. Win them over with the sort of goods than can only be produced with nimble fingers -- fine-woven cloth, tools, gadgets -- and build a trading economy that binds them closely to your interests.


5

Ancient armies were not stupid. Their tactics balance their goals, their constraints, their information available, and their resources available...just like ours do today. Medieval tactics were generally built around horses as the kings of the battlefield. Infantry formations were designed to protect from fast-moving cavalry attacks (pikemen, for example). ...


5

Don't capture one giant from the tribe. Instead, hire the whole tribe (they are as smart as humans). Then spend treasure and resources to flatter them, corrupt them, promote them, and win their loyalty. THAT will make you a force to be reckoned with.


4

The place to look would be the Prussian reform movement of the late Napoleonic wars. This is one of the few armies in history to manage anything close to what you are asking for. What this suggests is that you have three primary problems in your setting: Economics Why did no one in northern Europe field Phalanxes? Or why was Rome able to adopt the maniple? ...


3

The constraints as written...are not the best so forgive me for taking the liberties of adding some variables since I think everyone else has done plenty on highlighting the strengths of something employing a phalanx as a conquering method and the use of cavalry and ranged units against it. First of all I shall point out the latter two are very effective ...


3

The situation with the ancient Greek Phalanx is ore complicated than the OP seems to think. the Phalanx isn't "just" a tactical formation, but also encapsulates the social order of Classical Greece as well. One might wonder why the Greeks evolved such a formation given the argumentative and relatively individualistic (for the time) culture of classical ...


3

In addition to what Plutian the employment of mercenaries may lead to less bloody battles as less people are willing to die for coin than for honor/glory/etc. Furthermore I do recall that I read somewhere that the Italian peninsula saw less pillaging, raping and looting than it was "the norm". The argument for that was that the condottieri did not want to ...


2

The question fails on one major point: air and sea power are elements of Force Projection, allowing the user to bring forces to bear at the time and place of their choosing. Nominally inferior powers like Athens vs Sparta in the Peloponnesian War, the Serenìsima Repùblica Vèneta vs the Ottoman Empire or Elizabethan England vs the Hapsburg Spanish Empire ...


2

If they are simply the best available, many advantages. This was very much a Norman/Viking/Rus characteristic. One disadvantage would be they might have a vested interest in prolonging the conflict/stalemate to maximise their income.


2

Form alliances There are two problems with using these warriors for offense. The first is that the warrior is rendered neutral by the presence of an enemy warrior. That is, your warrior is completely useless if the opposing army can deploy their warrior to counter yours. Furthermore, on the off chance you can trick your enemies and deploy your warrior deep ...


2

A few off the top of my head: Asteroid impact or megavolcano. Make it as big or as small as you want. Put it anywhere you want. Directly destroys whatever it lands on. Throws up huge dust clouds that affect crop production and biosphere for years (look up the proposed dinosaur-killing asteroid and scale it back by a factor of 2). If you land it in the ocean ...


2

Politics: Divide and Conquer Since they live in semi-nomadic tribes, I imagine that some of the tribes... don't get along. Make a deal with the tribe(s) you find to be the least offensive. Woo them with food and drink. Have them go after the other tribes, and capture them for you. Then, once all the allied giants have captured all of the enemy giants, ...


1

No. From the Macedonian phalanx to the Pikemen these kind of armies have been very effective for almost 2000 years. Provided their flanks were protected by more mobile units. Moving a huge number of soldier with their pikes requires a lot of coordination, every single turn must be done on the order of a commander who might be 100 meters away, otherwise ...


1

A trench wider than the giant's stride and with the inside surrounded with a tripping hazard with a collapsible drawbridge and covered in net. "Fun" fact. Elephants can't jump. They're too massive. Tripping is potentially fatal for an elephant. A biologist once described it to me this way, "If a mouse, a human, and an elephant jumped off a twenty story ...


1

Rational Kings will adhere to the time honoree wisdom that ‘amateurs talk about tactics, while professionals talk about logistics.’ They’ll focus on how to use their super-soldier to maximize the damage to their opponent’s infrastructure while minimizing the risk to their own infrastructure. If they can destroy the other guys capacity to feed their people, ...


1

Two ideas: (1) Fossil Fuels Suddenly Run Out: We know the fossil fuels will eventually run out. They just ran out much sooner than predicted. This cripples most industry but has no obvious effect on the biosphere. Eventually we can recover by converting to nuclear/solar/wind. (1.5) Earthquakes make some major oil wells inaccessible. Yes the fuel is ...


1

Communication technology is important. Modern tactics presuppose that radios are cheap, light and reliable. You can disperse a hundred small squads over some rough terrain and have them all keep in regular contact with headquarters, which may also be receiving reports from aerial or satellite surveillance. If rapid communication means blowing horns, and ...


1

FRAME CHALLENGE: I think your basic idea is flawed because since your invading military force employing a phalanx or similar formation is demonstrating the highest level, for that period of time, of military organization. Their soldiers will need to be trained very well trained so they can recognize the trumpets, flags, shouted orders that tell the ...


1

Normally, it wouldn't be a problem. However, there are few concerns. 1) Loyalty. Do those mercenaries have reputation? If they had fought for multiple employers and honored their contracts, hiring them should be no problem. 2) Past offenses. Did those mercenaries commit atrocities against the kingdom? Do they have an ill reputation similar to GoT/ASoIaF ...


1

You won't feel bad about sending them off to be slaughtered as a sacrificial unit; and you won't make the mistake of trusting them too much. Also, if the enemy really wanted/needed them (because of a shortage of cavalry/pikemen/bowmen/whetever the mercenary unit is), then hiring them deprives the enemy of a crucial resource. And because you can then use ...


1

Here come the boring statistics, it will be a long answer. The invasion of Cuba was OPLAN 316 [Operational Plan]. Cuba had 17 divisions with a total of 130,000 all ranks: 1 armoured, 3 motorized, and 13 infantry. Tanks were mainly Soviet T-34s. The Soviets had a Motorized Rifle Division on Cuba of 4 Motorized Rifle Regiments instead of the normal 3. ...


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