56

Ignoring the killer Square-cube Law, larger vocal cords would result in a much deeper voice. Average Human vocal cords are 1.5 to 2.5 cm long. Typical frequencies for the human voice are 110 Hz to 310 hz with numerous harmonics. With vocal cords, 8.5 times the size of an average human, the giant's voice may actually be so low as to be difficult to ...


16

Your aliens will be unable to produce labial consonants. As you've correctly identified, the biggest challenge in speaking without cheeks will be the lack of lips. In English, the units of sound in speech, or phonemes, that use the lips as active articulators are known as labial consonants. In English, labial consonants take the form of bilabial or ...


13

The voice will be deeper due to the length of the vocal cords. size of the cords vibrating across the larynx determine the pitch, around 120 Hz in men and 210 Hz in women. This is the fundamental frequency. I haven't attempted calculations but your giants voice might even be too low to be heard properly at that size. The lower range of our hearing is around ...


12

What would be the evolutionary advantage to this? A wider range of sound frequencies may (maybe) allow for a more complicated communication ... but we already have languages that range from very simple to unbelievably complex. So, while I provide some insight with my answer, please bear in mind that this evolutionary development doesn't actually make sense....


11

The voice will be much much deeper. Look at real-world giants, who are nowhere near that large. I recall seeing one of the tallest living women on TV, and she has a voice that’s deeper than normal men, and she is mistaken for a man on the phone. Look at a double-bass vs cello, viola, and violin. Bigger means lower frequency. A string 8.5× longer has a ...


11

There's a team of japanese researchers constructing an artificial mouth with the purpose of emulating human speech. It consists of a pump that pumps air through the mouth, a vibrating membrane, a silicone rubber tube with an integrated tongue and a nasal cavity. I persoanlly find it hard to actually understand what it says (since I don't speak Japanese), ...


10

Let's start from an easier position. Let's start with what a wolf can't do. Wolves form very few front-of-the-mouth sounds. A whistle, for example, is beyond them. As would be a hiss or an "oooh" sound (indeed, O and U vowels might be beyond them). Wolves don't have significant lip control (at least I've never seen a dog smirk, though that's likely not ...


8

This is Thomas Edison with his second phonograph in 1878. The Victorian era ended in 1901 as far as I am aware. All you need is a set of pre-recorded phrases and a random-access needle or head. The Sexy British Accent™ is up to whomever is dubbing it.


8

Possible, yes, but ... The theory of long range communication by acoustics is very similar to that by radio, or indeed a number of other channels. To reason that communication s more difficult at very long range is that some noise sources are at a more-or-less constant power density, whereas the signal power density declines with distance -- typically as $...


6

A totalitarian regime wants citizens who can speak, but not sing. If you're willing to accept sign language as "speaking" you've two reasonably simple options. Cut their vocal cords Cut out their tongues If you're not willing to accept sign language as speech for the purpose of your question then your only option would appear to be tone deafness. to be ...


6

Dragon: Squeaky, flamey patois. In the movies, dragons are big and are given big low voices. That is fine. How could it be different? And especially how can it be different for a way that lends itself to a visual medium like a game. I can think of 3 ways dragon speech can differ from a humans: pitch, visual effects with speaking and word choice. Pitch....


6

If the giant is simply a scaled human, then the other answers show how they would sound. But if we allow some modifications to their vocal cords, for example dividing them so that instead of one large set, they will have many human-sized vocal cords, then we may be able to make them sound just like (very loud) humans.


6

There are ways to use other throat / mouth structures as additional sound generation organs analogous to vocal cords. You can get an idea of what your 2-vocal cord creatures might sound like by listening to cats and overtone singers. Overtone singing. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overtone_singing Tuvan throat singing is the most famous of these styles. ...


5

@JBH's answer is great; it deals with questions of biology, and it sets out the different possibilities for parallel/series vocal cords. However, it's confused around what series vocal cords entail. Here I'll take a purely acoustic perspective to flesh that out. Short answer With vocal cords in parallel (ie. one for each lung, with the airstream combined ...


5

Well, seeing as the more limited of the two forms (vocally, I mean) is the wolf, I find it logical that most such shared sounds would originate from the wolf side. Wolves have several distinctive sounds that can be transferred through to the human: Whining. Whining is quite a common canine sound which often signifies sadness, discomfort and several other ...


5

BACKGROUND (setting the context for my answer): I actually used to be a researcher in a university lab that created the software for voice synthesizers back in the 1980's. At that time, all the synthesizers used recordings of human voices and edited examples of each phoneme (the sound you might associate with a letter, but it's not letters). Then the ...


4

It's going to sound a lot like an automated train announcement. The reason being is that we're going to use the same principles. Individual words recorded on separate wax cylinders selected and played back by your automata mechanism in the appropriate order. Not entirely human, not entirely inhuman, but entirely in keeping with the technology of the era. ...


4

Use an Electrolarynx The real world has artificial voiceboxes for people who have damaged voiceboxes. They basically detect the motion of muscles in the throat and convert it into sound. Normal speech has many components not related to the throat - mouth shape, volume, etc, and thus the electrolarynx has traditionally sounded "robotic". So surgically ...


4

Ents, being tree-people (as opposed to magically animated trees) have either evolved from another life form (a tree or an animal mimicking a tree very well) or were created (either magically or via gods, etc.) dependent on your world's lore. If it's a tree-mimic, than standard mammalian vocal cords or the avian equivalent would not be unexpected. Tree-...


3

Assuming the rest of the vocal apparatus is human-shaped and has comparable features, yes, they would be able to talk. Vocal resonation would be quite off, and the pitch would likely be higher - rather than growl, your average werewolf would tend to yip (but that may vary as it depends on several other factors). The lip thickness matters little; much more ...


3

Other answers have described how longer vocal cords will vibrate at lower frequencies. This shows that a longer cord would mean your giant speaks with a deep, booming, lower frequency voice. But that fails to take into account that your vocal cord isn't just lengthening. It is simultaneously thickening. If your giant doesn't adapt, but just "expands" in ...


3

Keep in mind that while others say it would be deeper, its likely other giants would hear sound different from humans so they might just interpret the sound emitted by a giant as we do hear a human speaking, and therefore we have pretty high pitched voices compared to those big guys.


3

What exactly would a talking dragon's voice sound like? Animal vocalisations evolved as a result of a number of behavioural factors interacting such as kin recognition, dominance/submission, mating displays and dances, differential alarm calls, aiding in coordinating hunting behaviour, play in younglings - perhaps even to lure prey and I'm sure many others. ...


3

The human hyoid and larynx is very unique in position and shape and is essential for speech, changing it drastically will likely prevent speech entirely. But let's be clear humans have one of the widest vocal ranges known outside birds, we can roar it just not what you want. Humans can produce a "roar", it is not a complicated sound. We just do not have the ...


2

Just to point out the obvious... the modern speaker was invented in the victorian era (1870s). The only major difference between the voice synthesis of today and 150 years ago is control. Depending on how advanced your automaton's "brain" is would be where any quirks would come from. If it just doesn't have to processing power to mimic the hertz rate of ...


2

Depending on what level of computation your automaton can perform, and the level of complexity your mechanism can have, you could do a sort of micro-pin system wherein a needle runs across a series of tiny pins that are placed at different heights, just as a record has teeth in the grooves at a microscopic level. The resolution of such a device would be ...


2

The sound of all letters where you must twist your lips inwards would be affected. Not that they would not be able to say them, but it would somehow come out differently. U. cute. brute. dude. oo. (same as above) ew. (same as above) O. con. don. gone. V. They might have a lot of trouble saying this perfectly. vile. valor. vine. S. This would be ...


2

IMHO, other interesting things to consider is this one: As everybody said, a giant's voice will be generally deeper. This means the frequency is lower. Now... when a sound penetrates a material, the higher the frequency, the more it is attenuated. So, this means that a giant's voice will be more likely to be heard across a large wall than a human's voice. ...


2

To be funny enough, to stop people from signing, you don't go for their vocal chords. You go straight to the main man. The brain. There are two areas in brain that are responsible for talking. Broca and Wernicke. One is responsible for understand meaning of words while second is responsible for translation of those meaning into spoken/written words. A ...


1

Due to the huge amount of air expired, there would be a lot of parasitic noise. For example, the breathing would be at least heard 50 meters around. Each time he would speak, air would whistle on his teeth like wind in rocks.


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