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0

It sounds viable, although I'd doubt the layout is strictly necessary. It doesn't have the requirement of the four-eyed fish to view in two different mediums with different refractive indexes at once, and so it is probably better off without multiple pupils, but multiple pupils is entirely valid as well. I'd especially question the need for one set of eyes ...


3

The Mantis Shrimp (certainly a fast predator on some scale) has triple-sectioned compound eyes (each section having a pseudopupil, as others have called out on different animals' compound eyes), and the eyes are very movable on stalks. While this doesn't optically equal the idea you've asked about, the complexity and distinct functionality of the separate ...


51

This is the four-eyed fish: It has only two eyes, but it two pupils and two retinas in esch. It evolved to hunt by the water surface, catching prey from both above and below. Where there is an evolutionary pressure, there is a way to evolve. This fish proves that what you want is possible. However, do notice that this fish evolved multiple pupils because ...


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There is no problem. Don't get bogged down by trying to imagine "how the world looks" to such a creature. In the real world, there are all kinds of animals with all kinds of senses coming from all kinds of angles and it just works, because brains are flexible and don't really care where their information is coming from or what form it takes, as long as it ...


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KISS! (Keep it Simply Stupid) One pupil per eye, multiple eyes because multi-pupiled eyes would become a nightmare from an optical design perspective: The pictures you posted are about the exterior of the eye but the interior is what makes it work, and there is no biological advantage in multi-pupiled eyes as you'd need multiple lenses, irises, ciliary ...


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Long wavelength EM or sonar are both probably good picks for low-latency feedback. However, both types of wave will be scattered and attenuated to some extent (just, less so than visible light EM). One thing to note is that "Temperature and humidity affect odor because they increase molecular volatility." Perhaps your Hell Fires have extremely sensitive ...


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Ever seen a snake frisk its tongue !! It doesn't do it do just look cool, It can see it's prey in 3 different modes. One, with its eyes, can see a broader spectrum than us. Second, use its tongue to pick up the smell in the environment. but the really cool one is the third, that is vibrations. A snake can pick up vibrations around it and pinpoint the ...


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Not a biologist or physicist, but the simplest answer I can think of is infrared vision. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y7mROTPAVZM As seen here, it does penetrate fog to a degree, and at long distance. Yes, infrared isn't as clear as normal vision without fog, but it is probably enough of an advantage in bad conditions to be viable. I think you can ...


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Infrared, Sonar, and Other Waves Some animals use "bio sonar", or echolocation as a form of "sight" (ie, navigating and foraging). It's also possible for your creatures to see infrared radiation. If fact, your creatures could emit small amounts of waves from just about anywhere on the electromagnetic spectrum, except for visible light, and therefore "see" ...


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