177

The question shows a misunderstanding of why the Middle Ages were medieval. It's not that the people who lived in those times did not know any better. They did. In particular, they had good Roman books about military strategy, tactics and logistics; for example, they had and they actually read Vegetius's De re militari; the book was copied over and over, and ...


130

Go back to the cold war era and start a "Russians are trying to warm the planet" scare. You will need a lot of money to fund some big advertising campaigns. You also want to seed a few specific technologies like nuclear and solar power to try and push them along. Let ignorance and paranoia work towards the betterment of mankind for a change. It's ...


117

If they are just bringing the drives, and not the attached computer, this is pretty much impossible. The infrastructure simple isn't there in 1300 to refine anything to the necessary purities to even begin manufacturing microprocessors. See this answer to get an idea of how hard this is to do: How long would it take to create a Windows 1.0 capable machine ...


96

Honestly the 'modern' military theory that would give Lord Gary the biggest advantage would be modern attitudes towards hygiene. It was extremely common in the time period you're talking about for a force to lose more troops to dysentery and other diseases than they lost in actual combat. By taking a very firm attitude towards latrine maintenance and ...


96

Befriend and hang out with fellow passenger, Margaret (Molly/Maggie) Brown then follow her to lifeboat #6 which historically will have available seats.


80

You can't get anywhere close to that technology level. The best you could do is work to increase their life expectancy. Teach them farming. Teach them how to get water from a river into their fields. Teach them about cleanliness and basic first aid medical care. If your group of people can boost the life expectancy long enough to actually have ...


74

No. But I'm answering this from a different perspective: world population. 10,000 years ago, the world population was around 10-20 million. And this population was spread across the globe. Your experts would only find small villages, consisting on average of several hundred people at most. Even if your experts could convince everyone to do exactly as ...


70

As soon as a lifeboat launches, volunteer to be in it. At first there were quite a lot of people who hesitated to go into a little wooden boat in the middle of the Atlantic, when the big reassuring liner still had power and light and was merely stopped. Here is the wikipedia link looked up by DevSolar. Pryftan is right, a source never hurts.


67

The printing press is not what Gutenberg invented. The printing press itself was known in Europe since the High Middle Ages at least, and in China even earlier. He did not invent movable type, which was also known. As for the "mechanization skills" needed -- printing was the last of the basic industries to be mechanized. Printing remained extremely labor-...


59

Just track it Since: Nothing other than foreverium is forever You're a time traveller There's no real reason to worry about this ring, whoever has it right now is as ephemeral as any security system. All you need to do is know where and when the ring is at any given point and you can pick the thing up. Wait until the end of time if you want to and just ...


53

The correct answer is to just join the crowd of time travelers getting their own foreverium ring at Evaporation Point. Think about how you've described your foreverium ring for a second. It's immutable, unalterable, and undecay-able. So, what happens when the universe goes old? It survives heat death, it survives particle decay, and it survives at the ...


52

No Barring the existence of some Illuminati-type organization who watches for people like you, anyway. Most of these tech companies succeeded because they had the good fortune to introduce a service or good into the market at the right time and had the right strategies to defeat all their competitors. It would be difficult to see how an influx of money ...


51

There are no paradox concerns. Your system prevents modification of the past, so there is no way to cause changes which would lead you to not go back in time, or go back in time differently. Your system cannot see into the future, so you cannot see the effects of your actions and act differently. Really, it's more of a VCR than time travel. You can go ...


51

But we do all run on steam All (non-renewable) power plants are steam driven. Even nuclear power is a glorified steam engine. What we don't do so much any more is drive directly using the steam, it's now a stage removed from the effect. The steam drives the turbines to generate electricity that drives your machines. As soon as you swap to an electric car, ...


47

Let's manage our expectations a little, and consider a fairly discrete (but certainly iconic) 21st century technology: firearms. But let's manage expectations further and try to create a modern firearm's 14th-century ancestor: the cannon. A cannon is, crudely, a lump of metal with a big hole at one end and a tiny hole at the other, into which you pour ...


46

Buy a first class ticket If you had a child with you would increase it more. You could also have your life jacket with you and wait near the lifeboats. Being a woman would also increase the odds. Even if you were a first-class passenger with a higher likelihood of getting a seat in a lifeboat, your chances of getting that seat increased if you were a ...


42

I think there is a major flaw: Since there is no fast forward, you could never catch up with the present. For everyone else, time moves forward and you are always behind. Unless triggering the time travel freezes time for everyone else.


42

You're on deck, which is the most important thing. Your survival odds are already waaay up. It'll be cold on deck. Wear a big coat. Underneath your coat, wear a good dry suit with some high-quality thermals underneath (possibly battery heated ones). The photos on the Wikipedia page notwithstanding, a drysuit needn't make you look like an astronaut, ...


39

Bring the Tools, not the Weapons The hard part here is getting the precision tooling you will need done right. Rifling a barrel and pressing ammunition is pretty darn hard without the right equipment, but all the tools needed to set up a fire-arms and munitions workshop take up surprisingly little space. Since he has enough wealth in the 21st century to ...


38

The thing is the massive amount of energy. Sure you could go back and collect iron, coal, oil, etc but is it worth the expense? Raw materials can be collected from space by asteroid harvesting and the energy to rip a hole in the fabric of time/space just to mine I suspect will be far greater than asteroid mining. Now where you make your money is collecting ...


34

Quite obviously, the only way to read SSDs in the 14th century is to bring a computer. Or, actually, several computers. With great care, the computers will last for some twenty years, in which time one could hope, with an extraordinary amount of good luck, to push technological progress up to the 17th century -- you know, printing presses, telescopes, ...


33

The mad scientist sledgehammer option for this particular nut. Kill a very large slice of the world population. It worked when Europe colonised the Americas, so many natives were killed it actually changed the global climate. America colonisation ‘cooled Earth's climate’ He travels back in time to the height of the cold war at its most unstable & ...


33

Antoine Lavoisier should not have been executed Lavoisier's importance to science was expressed by Lagrange who lamented the beheading by saying: "Il ne leur a fallu qu’un moment pour faire tomber cette tête, et cent années peut-être ne suffiront pas pour en reproduire une semblable." ("It took them only an instant to cut off this head, and one ...


33

First people need to understand how relativity works. There's a thing called proper time which we regard as an interval between two events or points in spacetime. In "ordinary common sense" space you define the distance (the interval) like this : $$s^2 = (x_2-x_1)^2+(y_2-y_1)^2+(z_2-z_1)^2$$ That's the square of the distance between two point. Time (and ...


33

No As it is you will be lucky to have any impact at all. You have a lot of dead weight and you are missing the most important fields. Things your forgot The first thing you need is better food production, for that you need biologists, agricultural scientists and soil scientists. without them, most of your effort is wasted and you may do more harm than ...


31

Unless he's an expert metallurgist the biggest issue you're going to have isn't in terms of producing the parts; anyone with a drill and a hand file (or some rocks that will serve the purpose) and enough patience can make a gun from a solid block of appropriate metal and therein lies the problem. Modern weapons require modern alloys, many of which are ...


31

Lots of excellent stuff here so here is my 2 cents. One of the biggest "modern" warfare things that Lord Gary could adopt that was not very common is the concept of Meritocracy in his army. Throughout history this always seems to present an odd dichotomy, as some of the most terrifying and effective Armies in history had at least a bit of this going on. ...


30

You have a whomping big paradox You stipulate that the traveller "cannot change anything that happened to [he/she]." That's a problem. You can jump back and relive time, but you can't change the fact that you jumped back to relive time. You'll never live another second of free will at all. Let's investigate this. Assumption Let's ignore the entire is-...


29

The simplest way to ensure that you yourself - and as many others as possible- survive the Titanic disaster is to distract the forward lookout at the critical moment so that he does not give warning of the iceberg ahead until it is too late to turn the ship... if at all. If the means by which you distract the lookout is to offer him the use of your period-...


29

Not a full 21 century world, but we can get close to it in some ways. 10,000 members tribe in post-glaciation Germany would be HUGE, but let's take it for a fact. One of the problems is that 10,000, even 20,000 people is not even closely enough to accomplish our task. And German lands are not fertile enough to support big preindustrial population. Here is ...


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