36

Bring the Tools, not the Weapons The hard part here is getting the precision tooling you will need done right. Rifling a barrel and pressing ammunition is pretty darn hard without the right equipment, but all the tools needed to set up a fire-arms and munitions workshop take up surprisingly little space. Since he has enough wealth in the 21st century to ...


29

Unless he's an expert metallurgist the biggest issue you're going to have isn't in terms of producing the parts; anyone with a drill and a hand file (or some rocks that will serve the purpose) and enough patience can make a gun from a solid block of appropriate metal and therein lies the problem. Modern weapons require modern alloys, many of which are ...


29

First people need to understand how relativity works. There's a thing called proper time which we regard as an interval between two events or points in spacetime. In "ordinary common sense" space you define the distance (the interval) like this : $$s^2 = (x_2-x_1)^2+(y_2-y_1)^2+(z_2-z_1)^2$$ That's the square of the distance between two point. Time (and ...


12

Firearms require a social and industrial ecosystem to exist. Modern weapons with metal cartridges could not exist before the development of deep draw dies and the skilled workers to use them. Even as late as the 1860's (American Civil War) cartridges were paper cylinders holding the powder and the ball, but now you need a cheap source of paper (and ...


10

Imagine you are a single dimensional creature, You go along and encounter an object. You hit said object and it disappears out of your universe, because it took a vector outside your perceptional ability to comprehend. but if you change your comprehension to a 2D universe, you notice it moved in a vector perpendicular to the 1D field of view, moved to the ...


9

Nothing. No modern firearm or ammunition will pass for an ancient one. Every speck of metal and every chemical trace will make it stand out as not belonging. Worse no one is reproducing modern firearms or ammunition prior to the ~1800's and metal lathes, chemistry, and precision measurement. Basically if they can make a firearm, they are already making ...


5

Springfield Model 1861 As long as you go to a place where people have no problem creating iron swords and equipment you should be able to get them to create a (initially probably unrifled) version of this gun that works with a minimum of tools. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yB5S1LufNyo). At first your engineers (let's assume you go to India at 100 BCE ...


4

I'm going to post a bit of an off-beat answer: you've probably already experienced a 2-time-dimension universe. Because that's exactly what you experience when you play a computer game with pauseable time controls. Think about it - you've got two time dimensions: real-time and game-time. More than that, those different 'times' are orthogonal. Real time ...


3

The problem with reproducing modern firearms in pre-industrial civilizations would be: steel of inadequate quality lack of precision tools lack of an industry capable of manufacturing smokeless gunpowder. severely limited possibilities for economics of scale. The cause why people in the middle ages didn't make cartridge-based automatic firearms wasn't ...


3

He should bring back a replica firearm from a historical period as close as possible to the one he's trying to dominate. The precision manufacturing and metallurgy and chemistry of the time will fundamentally limit reproduction, so picking something that could already nearly be made will help tremendously. Note that he still has his work cut out for him. ...


3

I haven't read Dichronauts, but unless you can time travel, I don't see how it would change anything. Time is not entirely comparable to a space dimension, because you can't move freely in it. It goes in only one direction, and and at the same rate by everyone (except for relativity, I'll come to that later). If we see time as a vector (typically in these ...


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