26

The humans are toast (well, medium rare anyway). Short version : ten degrees Celsius should do it, twenty would be more than enough. Luckily for us, their ovens are really slow and the Earth heats up really slowly (a few degrees celcius every year) Which, I assume would give use enough time to react to the change in temperature and allow us to start ...


15

There are a lot of such organisms right here on Earth. Undersea volcanic activity produces hydro-thermal vents. These are places where water is heated and then rises out of the sea floor. Typically this also brings with it a wide variety of chemicals that are ordinarily not available in such quantity in the ocean water. And there are organisms that find ...


14

Have an axis tilt [1] over 56° or under 124° Between these points the poles and the equator switch climate. Technically speaking the poles simply have a higher thermal insolation average per year than the equator. This graphic [5] shows the relationship between axial tilt (obliquity) and the yearly average temperature (insolation) for a given latitude. ...


13

Unshielded humans will expire above 40 C Well-prepared humans should be able to hang on to 1000 C and more for some time. Due to our temperature management, humans can withstand temperatures above 100C for hours, and between 40 and 50C for days. However, all natural temperature management depends on evaporation and works only in low humidity. In high ...


12

So, first of all, there's no particular reason that geothermal heat has to be dangerous. Scandanavia makes VERY extensive use of it and always has. The use of geothermal heating for exactly the kind of purposes you're describing goes back to the paleolithic era. Ultimately, there are only two sources of thermal energy available to a planet. Radiant energy ...


12

It looks like there will be only a narrow margin of temperature rise before harm is done to persons passing through a wormhole. Probably, no more than one or two degrees centigrade. The general conditions associated with heatstroke are as follows: Heat-related illnesses typically are categorized as heat exhaustion or heatstroke. Heatstroke is divided ...


10

The term you may be looking for is "mesothermic". Mesothermic creatures maintain a body temperature above their environment, but it's not a stable temperature. There have been many animals that are, or were mesothermic. Sharks, Tuna, Leatherback Sea Turtles, and echidnas are all mesothermic. It's believed many dinosaurs were mesothermic.


9

If you have a bottomless heatsink you can generate free electricity by using the difference between ambient temperature on Earth and voids of subspace. Basically an inverse refrigerator that generates electricity by cooling things. As it was pointed out in comments, a Stirling engine will suffice. Doing this will probably also affect global warming ...


9

Depends a lot on how humans prepare. Without humanity adapting, with the above scenario you'll probably collapse society in 5 years and make us extinct in 10. However, just heating up won't hurt well-prepared humans. For example, dig a few hundred meters into a mountain, and you won't even notice the external heating. Easiest method for humanity to create ...


9

You are such a creature. The skin of your face can be exposed to 0 Celsius when you are 37C. That's almost 40C difference. What happens is you got skin and fat. Also clothes. What happens when sea mammals swim in cold water? They use a combo of fur and fat to insulate themselves. The other stuff is the same as you touching a lizard. Feels cold but it ...


8

"Standard" petrifaction like what can happen to wood of the bones, teeth, and probably scales is highly likely if your dragon is buried deeply. Depending on the particular processes that occur parts of the beast may be opalised. It is also possible, depending on the make up of your dragons, that parts of them are already composed of jewel like materials, ...


8

Have you looked at the creatures that live on and around the black smokers on the mid-Atlantic Ridge? Many of the creatures there thrive in water that would flash to steam if it was at sea-level. They freeze to death if they get too far away from the 900°C water pouring at of the volcanic rocks. Most of these creatures are crustaceans though I'm not sure ...


8

Regional endothermy. You want your cold blooded "lizardfolk"* to have cold blooded heritage but to be active predators like badgers and be smart like humans. You could allow them to use muscular action to heat blood and then shunt it where it was needed. Several lineages of fish do this and some moths also. http://bioweb.ie/warm-blood-sharks-tunas-...


8

Yes, it's a pumice armor It's made from fire-resistant rocks to protect the wearer. This is the in-game description of the armor, which means that it must be made from some sort of rock. Furthermore, if we poke around a bit further, we get a second very important piece of information: This isn't a fireproof armor, it's merely a fire resistant armor. ...


7

Slow rotation. Lots of time to heat up during the day, lots of time to cool down at night.


7

Starting with the Earth as a template: Move it closer to the sun Reduce axial tilt Add thick rings Rings around a planet like Earth would last a few million years at best, but we've been around for less time than that. The poles would be hot due to star proximity. The rings would reduce radiation on and close to the equator, making it cold.


7

Directed Energy Weapon Eater one could armor something we wish to protect with the bottomless heatsink to protect it against directed energy weapons. So long as we can absorb all of the incident energy and the heat transfer rate to the bottomless heatsink is high enough, we can prevent the armor from melting. For more fun, we can use said absorbed heat to ...


7

They don’t need heat to gain energy from it. They need heat to survive the massively endothermic process of laying down their energy stores. The Grokes evolved in a high temperature environment where food occasionally showed up in large quantities and was scarce the rest of the time. As a response they evolved a highly sophisticated, highly efficient, ...


7

Both, actually. Its a tricky question, given that we have exactly 1 species to draw from, and it clearly evolved to be effective in the environment it evolved in. Its hard to work in both extremes. Yes, you get hot working in hot weather, but go try working in a Siberian winter, and you'll see that cold can be just as problematic. Cold lets you dissipate ...


7

What I'm looking for is a plausible estimate. Would one freeze to death during night time for example, or would a temperature drop to "a slight chill" be believable. Obvious answer: do you want people to freeze to death? Then fine: they freeze to death overnight. Personally, I'd rather not. The long nights are obviously problematic in this regard, ...


7

Your body works on a lot of chemistry and enzymes. These are mostly built with about the same optimum temperature, in our bodies 37° celsius. Hypothermia occurs when the temperature goes so far off this ideal temperature that these enzymes break down or stop and chemical reactions stop functioning properly. Your hotter creature can be assumed to have ...


7

You’re asking the wrong question. What you want is a halfway house between homeothermic and poikilothermic, not between endothermic and ectothermic, and there are lots of examples. Endothermy is only one of three known mechanisms for homeotherms to regulate their temperature. In fact desert lizards are a good example, keeping their body temperature almost ...


6

You need to get the energy input equal over the whole of your planet - two options spring to mind: 1) The albedo (~reflectance) of the planet could be finetuned so the further to the poles you get the lower the albedo. This could be a result of the prevailing sediment at the different latitudes, and would not even have to be visible to the eye, if you ...


6

Temperature is not a coordinate like position, velocity, time, or rotation. Symmetries on those coordinates lead to conservation of momentum, special relativity, conservation of energy, and conservation of angular momentum. Symmetries of those values are aspects of the entire system, while temperature is an aspect of each part of the system. Absolute zero ...


6

Birds Chickens have a body temperature averaging around 42 C / 107 F - that's about ten degrees higher than humans. Some birds like the sombre hummingbird can reach as high as 113 F (about 15 degrees higher than humans - as cited by this study). Warm Blooded Creatures As @Gustavo and @Demigan point point out in their answers, warm blooded creatures can ...


5

Telluric iron fires. I was thinking about the underground coal fires, which are natural occurrences, can burn a long time, and produce a lot of heat. And also a lot of poison: the landscapes over these fires are spectacularly dead. Plus it has been done. But what else could be underground, gradually oxidize and give off heat? What about metallic iron? ...


5

Cell death occurs at 65 degrees Celcius or 149 F. I am informed that is pretty much universal for cellular organisms on our planet, or at least not those living on undersea vents or boiling mud. As noted in a previous answer, human beings are adept at creating temperature controlled enclosures and depending on available power some could survive ...


5

If you follow my answers, I really love to answer with "yes, nature loves to do all sorts of awesome things," and then link to some strange creature that does things you'd never expect possible. This is not one of those answers. The temperatures you describe are simply not accessible in the way you seek. They can't be achieved as an organ. The first ...


5

Stellar Exploration Literally meaning coat your ship and go take measurements of the insides of the sun. If you can do that then perhaps add a layer if to the sun to make it impossible to achieve helium fusion and stop the sun from expanding into a giant and swallow the Earth. Condense Jupiter so we can suck out Liquid Hydrogen with a simple hose. For ...


5

According to this reasearch, your ice will block around 60% of the light. In addition to that, greenhouses block 30-70% of the outside light. Assuming your greenhouse would be on the 30% side if it weren't for the ice, and that the light from your planet's sunlight is the same as ours, the light reaching the plants will be 40% of 70% of the original ...


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