New answers tagged

1

Above the surface, we contain liquids and solids in concave vessels, openings pointed up, and tilt them to pour contents. Below the surface, you can contain gases in concave vessels, openings pointed down, and tilt them to pour contents (at least for non-water-soluble gases; wouldn't work well at all for ammonia, hydrogen halides, or hydrogen sulfide/sulfur ...


8

They could absolutely get to space. "Rocket science" isn't a complex field of science: it's just ballistics and some straightforward chemistry. What's fiendishly complex is the precision engineering and manufacturing required to go, not just into space, but where you mean to go with very little margin for error. What this means is that initially your ...


3

Relativity becomes significant for either very large masses or very high velocity. No big impact until they deploy the equivalent of our GPS satellite network, or start equipping satellites with very precise clocks. At that point they will notice that clocks on the ground and clocks high up in space will measure different times. But nothing dramatic ...


2

So, sweet treepeople... you need a way past that pesky armor eh? We have a warrior in our myths we call the "Spider-Man." He often fought foes more experienced, better armored and equipped than he. Perhaps your warriors have heard similar myths and wish to fight as the cunning spider. Your best advantage (given your light gear) is your mobility, and your ...


4

OK, slightly left field answer to this one. Assuming you are in an equivalent ocean to Earth's, you're never going to need to do your chemistry purely underwater. You have a water surface, you have underwater vents, fish have swim bladders etc. If you are careful you can "harvest" these, with anything waterproof (intestines, etc). You may even be able to ...


4

The ease with which information could be obtained would depend on the details of the environment and might be seriously limited. The “easiest” situation would be a civilization based in a shallow sea with access to the materials of the coast and access to the surface. Harder would be a civilization based in a deep sea far from land. And the hardest would be ...


26

I think you are on the right track and this is a really fun question. I think the issues you mentioned with things like generating heat are much larger obstacles than doing chemistry in a fluid medium would be. For an aquatic-native race, anyway. I'm going to focus mostly on the last part of your question, "What would their developmental path look like?" ...


10

During my PhD years I had to work with some materials which were quite reactive: as soon as they were exposed to oxygen or water they reacted very vigorously with them, leaving the poor student with a damaged sample or, even worse, with a sample which spontaneously took fire. A solution for handling these materials and keep the students alive was to use ...


2

This turned in to a little longer than a comment could handle, but here are some thoughts I have as an amateur astronomer: It's not unusual to see a dozen or more satellites on a clear, dark evening. Just a few nights ago I was walking across the street and noticed two at once. If it's dark enough to see the Milky Way and you're paying attention to the sky, ...


5

NASA has no reason to try to hide a satellite and all the current answers are working from a basis of a non-stealthy satellite. If someone is trying to hide a recon sat they certainly could do so until the late 20th century. Build the satellite with all Earth-visible surface (other than the minimum needed for whatever sensors it uses) as black (both to ...


2

Spotting the satelite and observing its orbit would have been possible since ancient times. Understanding what they are is a different thing. They are too fast to discern by telescope so they will be dismissed as fast-moving asteroids at a low orbit. With a good telescope you can have a good detailed image as well. However, they are too fast to allow us to "...


37

As many other comments have suggested, orbit altitude is a key parameter in determining how visible the recon satellite would be. However, orbital altitude also determines how long the object will stay in orbit—specifically the perigee (lowest-point) altitude. Let's say the recon satellite was in a roughly-circular¹ orbit of 400km, which is approximately ...


14

I think you have to ask (and answer) multiple questions. When will it be detected as a recurring object in the sky? L.Dutch suggests the naked eye will do; that might depend on the size and height of orbit. When will it be recognized as an artificial object? Here you should keep in mind that it has always been there. People will come up with theories of the ...


3

Many kinds of plant provide oils and waxes that might help waterproof your heartvine equipment. It'll be awkward to make stuff like pitch or tar without access to suitable materials for the cooking containers, but you might be able to use the shells from some of the local animal species for this purpose. There may also be animal sources of waxes, oils and ...


0

The simplest answer is that after skillfully (and possibly at the cost of one or more of your troupe's lives) dispatching one or more of your pangolin-like predators, you turn the armoured scales, claws and teeth of your now-dead adversary into the weapons which which you dispatch further such adversaries... which has the potential, depending upon their ...


55

Artificial satellites orbiting around Earth are pretty easy to spot, since they appear as bright fast moving objects across the night sky. This even in a light polluted environment like a modern city. I remember I spotted satellites moving in the sky as a kid looking up at the sky with no knowledge of astronomy. Spotting them was even more exciting than ...


1

Use bones I think bone is the best material for many kinds of weaponry because it's hard, can be sharpened, and will not be destroyed by water. Make spears and atlatls with them. Use human bones if animal bones are too small. Combine with heart vines to make them even more deadly. Eating cooked bones, including small ones such as those from chickens, can ...


4

Vine splinter slingshots Using some form of hand protection, vine splinters can be made into a ball shape and then wrapped in leaves. These can then be shot from slingshots. Upon hitting a person, the ball breaks apart and cuts into them, where they begin to grow inside of them dangerously. Poisoned cinder moss You have stated that cinder moss causes ...


2

This depends very much on which people are included in that "minimum population" and how closely they're concentrated. A quarter billion could probably do it in a space like the continental United States -- that's about what our population was twenty years ago (Alaska and Hawaii don't count for population on this scale; the two combined equal one large city ...


-2

Not all countries and companies have the same technology so I think you have to pick what technologies you want to keep, take the population of a country which has the closest set but smallest population and then add the employees of the companies that posses the remaining technologies you want to keep. Keep in mind though that some technologies will become ...


1

Canals: Simply having good, standardized, well-maintained canals should do the trick. With roads on the sides so that draft animals (or people) can tow the barges against or without winds. Where locks are required, they have the standard size to allow standard barges through. Ocean Craft: Improved rigging. There was a lot going on, all the way to the 20th ...


3

Domesticated animals Humans are not very strong animals, so in our history our productivity took a big step up when we learned to domesticate animals and extract their superior muscle power. Canals have never been a fast way to travel, but they were a lot faster than eighteenth-century roads, and one horse could 'carry' an awful lot more load pulling a ...


2

On the sea, the best you can get is sail ships, if you're not willing to accept steam as an option. If you want to speed that up a bit, make sure your people have discovered and mapped Ocean currents. As for cannals, apart from oars, you can also go for paddlewheels. Yeah, paddlewheel ships, but not ones running on steam, but ones running on animal power. ...


1

Technological reform without social reform can be less than successful. You know why we call plumbing by that name? The word literally comes from the Latin for Lead; they used the metal for their water management throughout the empire because it was cheap, malleable and easy to manage as a resource. There is some evidence available to say that the Romans ...


0

This is not an answer to what the OP asked, but it's something about teletransportation that always bothered me. It may be useful in OP's plot. Teleportation means death. Even when no demons are generated, all your matter is disassembled into particles and then vanishes. You die on departure. What is reassembled on the other terminal is a copy of you, that ...


0

Every passanger will carry a camera with him. He/she reaches a secured place, hands out the camera through a special compartment to the security team. The team analyzes the recording of the entire teleportation process and searches suspicious activities. The camera is embedded into the passenger's wear, so that it will not draw the demon's attention and ...


0

In the comments, I pointed out that teleportation breaks the universe by allowing infinite energy. Infinite energy (which breaks a WHOLE lot of universes): Build very tall tower, line a shaft with copper coils. Teleport huge magnets into the top of the tower, then let them drop down the shaft. The relevant parts of the response (in chat, so few people ...


1

The Johnson Rectifier. Scientist Maria Johnson pulled logs from teleporter machines that caused demon events (many brave people died to gather these logs) and discovered a fluctuation in the quark pump, every time. She invented a quark pump filter and since then, no teleporter equipped with one has had a demon encounter--unless the filter was damaged.


1

There is no real side-effect., except for occasional hangover-like symptoms and few broken fragile items. The whole thing is a scam, used to remove unwanted people and steal valuable parcels.


1

Nested teleporters. If your teleport goes awry, just teleport the whole room into space. Then go retrieve your teleporter in 12 days.


2

If you're wanting the teleportation technology to be widely used, then you're going to need to keep some secrets. I'd probably say that the cover is that teleportation causes a low-level of radiation: The schematics of the teleporters are closely-guarded industrial secrets. The utility of the process would generate revenue, giving you a "teleportation lobby"...


2

In an effort to solve a completely unrelated problem, I put a little something on an Excel sheet. It should be transcribed correctly here (unless it's not). With $p$, the probability it backfires $n$, the number of uses $q$, the probability it backfires at least once within $n$ uses It gives $q=1-(1-p)^n$ , as I said the probability it backfires at least ...


1

Why risk human teleportation at all? Robots have been an effective means of exploring the universe for decades, and still make up the majority of our exploration team - and if a demon does manifest from one of these robots, well-armed robots are more than capable of dispatching such a creature, with only the loss of some equipment. Teleportation would ...


1

It will not affect development of the technology at all... not until the problem is discovered. This wonderful technology was adopted extremely quickly, and it was only some years later when the first demon came out that people suddenly had to backpedal, scale down use, and retrofit protection devices on existing devices. Total abandonment is not possible ...


2

Put it on jupiter orbit or further and you can travel back in time. Why? Well "instant" travel from physics perspective is the speed of causality (=speed of light). You probably know about time dilation - the faster you travel, the slower your time relative to observers in destination. If you traveled somehow at the speed of light, the route would be ...


0

Usage: Only if ABSOLUTELY necessary. However, if it is necessary to use it, here are a few general safety precautions: Quarantine in a low-oxygen, nitrogen-free atmosphere. Seperate quarantine chambers for every living thing. This is because, believe it or not, we actually produce a small amount of nitrogen when we exhale. As a result, the quarantine is ...


30

Seems like infinity energy, just teleport some stuff and there are chances you get something that would never die and doesn't need much to survive. Stick that demon into a large hamster wheel facing some people and BAM, unstopping energy generator. Just hope the demons doesn't break out.


14

All teleported goods and passengers are kept in nitrogen free quarantine for 11 days and observed for signs of extradimensional naughtiness. Either in vacuum, or in a low pressure pure oxygen atmosphere, depending on which is least damaging to the thing you're sending. People can't breathe pure oxygen at Earth sea level pressure, but we can breathe pure ...


1

The answer depends on many details. First, assuming the technology has just been invented, is the percentage of demonization even an accurate number? It is one thing to say "we have to maintain the quux field within a range of 15 angstroms (and we can do it reliably 98% of time), else bad guys are coming out of woodwork on the receiving end" vs "we ...


31

In a real emergency, maybe you can convince somebody to hop in, but it should be noted that for all we know getting dumped into the hell dimension is a fate much worse than death. Instead, I suggest we just keep using regular 'ole chemical rockets. But, the teleporter is still really useful here. Assuming the energy cost is paid at the sending end (you ...


3

The usage would be varied, but I think the primary uses would be for material movement and for special forces. Teleporters would be a fantastic supply chain tool. A way to get a big box of rations or bullets across great distances that cannot be interfered with by opposing forces is a fantastic advantage to the Empire. Create your box of goodies as a ...


3

Passengers: Its usage will be affected by not doing living things unless absolutely necessary. General anti-demon rules: Teleportation to friendlies is as a rule done towards a receivingpad without the controls to teleport. In case a demon takes posession of the material (say a crate of plasma weapons or something similarily harmless if it came alive) the ...


69

It was weaponized. The military now have the ability to teleport sufficiently large numbers of items to an enemy city (or key military facility, spaceship etc.) to trigger a demon invasion. No need for tricky-to-handle plutonium to destroy the enemy, just teleport them a few thousand packs of, say, Stay-Puft marshmallows.


65

The teleport "conversion" was solved for military ships by the simple expedient of putting the teleport receiver inside an armored compartment with a large, fast-opening door -- to vacuum. Any received transmission is interrogated in a manner that has been developed to provoke "demons" -- but is reasonably harmless to humans or other legitimate payload -- ...


1

Just gonna try and throw an idea that isn't what you don't want. How about recording data of past events where there was previously no observer? Sending back a data recording device one second so it could record from past events that were missed by the interested party. This could have forensic applications. But what is 1 second to forensic scientist? Not ...


2

No. First you are sending back the wrong people, and secondly you are sending back too few of them. And finally, 21st century technology is dependent on 21st century population. It is utterly impossible without either more people than could be put under control in that timeframe or more advanced knowledge than we currently have... Now, if you want 20th ...


2

In the 1632 series they have something of the same situation but 6 mile radius bit of USA moved from the year 2000 (or near it) and with it a town with all schools up to a high school, many small and some mid sized businesses, a power plant with enough staff to run it and so on. They land in the middle of Germany (as is now) in an area with many people who ...


1

A Resounding YES As per the OP's question, we only need to replicate the 21st Century and populate it, we don't need to make the same mistakes, trial and errors, wars, dead end results or bad theories/misconceptions that normal development requires. Many developments that constitute the modern structure of society have been developed in the last 100 years. ...


1

It would definetly be possible All you need is humans and 10000 members is quite a large number. lets say, in worst case 1/3 are old people 1/3 are children, 1/3 are adults lets take the adult women from the equation, and you would have at least 1600 men to do the heavy work needed to start the industrial revolution. Which is not bad. The children ...


2

Since one progress made right after another is just not how human minds work, no, not in 100 years. Instead of thinking in number-of-years think in generations. You can hyper progress one generation, lets say from hunter-gathering to farming but then you have to stop. Let dust settle. Make people see fruits of their efforts. The next generation would make ...


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