66

Youngsters. The first computers read and wrote punched cards or punched paper tape; they did not have any kind of user interface where being blind or sighted mattered. It was perceived as major revolution when some smart technician adapted a typewriter to be able to print computer output; electric teletypewriters were then adapted so that operators could ...


36

A year isn't going to cut it, you're looking at about a generation at least for any noticeable progress. The problem is the lack of industrial base. Medieval society is a hair's breadth above subsistence farming. Technology is largely driven and supported by population pressures, without that they don't have the need to progress nor to maintain anything you ...


32

The situation you describe is almost exactly (part of) the plot from the book "A Fire Upon the Deep". Which in my opinion presents a very plausible level of success. In fact the specifications you offer (1 year-ish time period, lack of homeworld contact for the high tech people) match the conditions in the book very closely. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


14

Basic sanitation, including the germ theory of many diseases. Animal husbandy and plant improvement based on Mendelian genetics. If they have the data and sensors, mid-term weather forecasts. Imagine a serf knew that there would likely be two more dry and sunny weeks before the harvest is due. Food preservation technologies like canning (this requires jars ...


14

I see no differences in how computer would have developed. The first computers used punched cards to take input and give output (one of the favorite prank among nerds in those days was to swap two random cards in the physical folder containing them, when the owner was not paying attention), and graphics came much later. And the reason is that when you move ...


11

No. But... simply because the term "ecological damage" is nonsensical. Modern sensibilities equate that term with unpopular human influence on nature. But humans are and always have been as much a part of the planet's ecology as any other living thing. When humans want to dam a river there is much anxiety about the potential for damaging the local ...


9

I think the biggest difference would be in the development of user interfaces. If computers had been designed primarily by and for blind users, I imagine a much more sophisticated version of the Refreshable Braille Display would be in common use by now. I'm imagining a grid of keys instead of a single row forming a kind of tactile screen. This would allow ...


6

There's a story from the age of the Altair. The Altair was one of the first computers that a hobbyist could afford. You put it together yourself, and then hopefully it worked. It became an odd solution in search of a problem. Nobody quite knew what to do with it. There were "computing clubs" where people met to try to figure out what it could do. In ...


5

The other answers are excellent and thought provoking, but I’d argue that you need to invent the printing press almost immediately. Without reasonable speed of instruction, it will be difficult to teach the necessary skills to bootstrap many of the other improvements. Of course, this does require a significant push for literacy, but I'd argue that many of ...


5

If the goal is truly technological transfer, nothing meaningful is going to happen in a year. There is a saying I've encountered while working in sales-related capacities, which is that you never sell a product, you sell the lifestyle that a product makes possible. I think that that's an important element here. Early interactions will be largely gifts, as ...


5

I think a good technology to consider in comparison is the telegraph. The telegraph also began as a technology processing bits of information that while accessible, in that they used the sound/touch of tapping, was also cumbersome to use in that it required the user to learn a specialized code to both input and interpret. So, you had a specialized profession ...


5

No Spacefaring implies advanced rocketry. Rocketry implies a long history of tinkering with different propellants. If this race is not particularly peaceful, they would have a lot of military applications for combustive propellants before they achieve their first space flight. They may not discover black powder the first, and weapons development may take a ...


4

An aquatic species would be unlikely to develop firearms. Their notion of chemistry would likely evolve from much different needs. They could conceivably develop biological based knowledge sooner than humans did since the sea, like the rainforest is a fast bio reactor generating new genotypes at fantastic rates. If they did need thermal energy to smelt ...


3

Not so much of an answer, but I'm not allowed to comment yet. Anyway there is an Anime currently airing called Dr. Stone featuring some guy who seems to know basically everything from todays science. The plot is, that every human was petrified for several thousand years and thus every piece of technology is gone. So he wakes up and finds some other humans ...


3

The European Renaissance involved rediscovering Greek and Roman culture, philosophy, etc, shortly after the Black Death dramatically thinned the population. The culture you described does seem to be isolated from their origins, but there is the little matter of how that cultural ancestry can be revitalized. The Inca did use Quipus as a form of writing, but ...


3

God considered making humans live much longer, say a thousand years each. Maybe then they would be more cautious. God also considered giving them more brains, a higher mental capacity to think ahead and do a risk analysis of what might happen and what one may better not do or just more mirror neurons to show more empathy with their surroundings. God ...


3

Technology is not in of itself a damage to nature. Lets look at earth, here the problems comes primarily from forms of greed. We use trawling for fishing, because then we can get 50% (arbitrary amount) more fish, even if it damages the sea floor. Same for most aspects of resource acquisition. It's a philosophy of "It's OK if I can get more now, if the ...


2

I think that computers would develop very different mechanisms to display information. Some form of Braille dot matrix that stimulated 5 or 10 fingers at a time would run out a practicality for many applications. It would work for simple question answer type problems, but data visualization wouldn’t work well. But, humans have sensitive skin on their faces ...


2

Technology is changing the environment All tech involves some kind of change. Collecting rainwater sounds harmless, but ... Can result in stagnant water and thus water-born diseases Result in changing the water table Affect the details of run-off and may either reduce or enhance flooding Requires materials to store rainwater, or land to submerge ...


2

You can't. By the time of bronze age collapse the sumerians and egyptians had alredy messed up the natural environment of Mesopotamia and Nile basin. You don't need modern technology to turn forests and swamps into farmlands and then the farmland into a salt marsh, like the old farmlands of Ur. All human activity will upset the environment. What your god ...


2

This reminds me of the braille interface that the character "Whistler," played by David Strathairn, used in the movie "Sneakers." Maybe they are real things but it would take a non-blind person to build these things. As an alternate path you can focus on the person. Blind people could become very adept at quickly processing streams of data and making ...


2

There are two sides to the problem. The first is technical and it's easy--if you can get the training tools and information to children, the next generation will have the full level of understanding and knowledge the race is capable of receiving, you are done training them and they will be as advanced as your children of the same age (assuming the same ...


2

Some basics which are freebees (as in, teachable immediately): The wheelbarrow Iron plow Oxen yoke The stirrup Some slightly longer-term (but simple): The flying buttress in architecture Punctuation Standardized spelling The caravel in ship design The printing press Utensils for food Crop rotation Calculus Watches CPR Emergency medical procedures An ...


2

Many answers so far identify the primary issue as social/cultural, but none feel like they hit that aspect squarely. I started thinking about it, then realised that the book "Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court" was actually the prototype for a good answer. So I'll draw freely from that book, below. Your problem is that your aliens are a small group ...


2

From a technology point of view, aliens can create and study a set of independent (advanced weapons required for negotiations with authorities) small closed guilds a-la "free masons" which would be able to keep (and develop very slowly) technologies on semi-religion basis in generations. The technologies should be a set of precalculated tables and some "...


1

The 1632 series is a many-book-long exploration of this topic. In this series, a 1999-era West Virginia town transfers technology to early-modern-era Earth. The premise that that the Americans arrived via time travel implies that faster-than-light travel is possible, even if the Americans have no idea how. The first technologies that the Americans seek to ...


1

since they are peaceful i guess computer (they can make advance robotic right?) that would help them for increase production and workforce to early industrialize them, or as revolutionary warfare like drone warfare. that unless they dont get accused as satanic or witch by the mass or religions though. and when i say computer, i mean an advance automaton(...


1

As other said, any technology will change the ecosystem. Prehistoric humans used fire and tools to hunt mammoth into extinction, along with other large animals. Any kind of agriculture replaces natural ecosystem. In fact, even evolution of animals changes the ecosystem. Mammals have driven dinosaurs into extinction. So your God would have to decide ...


1

How about if we throw Braille out of the room for a bit. Instead, think of something that combine the other senses. First thing that comes to mind was the musical instrument used to make the music in the movie Forbidden Planet. The idea is to make it more accurate and able to response to hands and fingers movements in 3D. Sound would tell the user where ...


1

Technology can't magically just not work This is in reaction to the answers suggesting that you can magically ban technology from working in your world, thus halting the technological advancement. Problem There is a great post on LessWrong on why you cannot change one simple reaction without it having consequences too massive to explain away. It takes ...


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