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3

In historical practice this varied widely. It really depends on so much going on in the world at that time, what the societies look like, how big the armies are, etc. Here are just two examples of how this could work in your story: To face a larger threat Philip II of Macedon had quire remarkable victory at the Battle of Chaeronea, which wiped out most ...


2

The soliders might not have any concept of nation, or who the boss of the boss of the boss of the village headman is. Look at European history -- often the court of the king spoke a different language than the peasantry. There is religion, and there is a social order, and the potential soldiers are at the bottom of the order and people on top tell them ...


18

From the perspective of an individual soldier in an ancient army, there's really no difference before and after the amalgamation. Regiments will continue to be raised primarily from one part of the empire: say, three from Alicevania, two from Bobtopia, one from Evopolis. If you're a Bobtopian slinger, you serve in a regiment that is almost if not entirely ...


8

Is it the threat of the slaughter of kindred that essentially forces these soldiers into the ruling army? That's a possible reason, but the overriding one is that they are soldiers, no work, no pay, they'll starve to death. So either they just work for a new employer who has been proven to be successful and might make them wealthy, or they run away and ...


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