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154

Firstly, if you don't have the capabilities to construct a closed life support system, then you have no business trying to construct a colony many light years away, with no support and no backup and no actual certainty that the world is safe or habitable ahead of time. Your colony ship either needs to be a habitat suitable for a decent number of people to ...


26

I think that the number one priority is actually going to be confirming that the planet is, in fact, as habitable as previously anticipated. Previous information on the planet took 500 years to get here; we don't know how fast we were traveling, but I assume it was a relativistic speed (IE a significant percentage of the speed of light). As such, all data ...


10

Good answers from a lot of people, but I can see one flaw: The premise that only one ship will be sent. What civilization will only send one ship on a one-way 500-year journey? Surely in 500 years other ships would also be sent to the same destination. Some of these might well be faster and could therefore arrive before the original vessel even gets there....


10

I believe the top priorities, in order, will be: Food and water. Once stored victuals run out, there will have to be local sources for food and water. Food might be adapted from local lifeforms, or the colonists can begin growing crops from seeds, etc., brought from home. Shelter. Shelter from wind, rain, and cold will be the second priority, once the ...


8

Earth is a nature preserve. Horrified at the destruction their ancestors inflicted on Mother Earth, humanity has moved aside to give her room to recover. Earth is a popular vacation site but is handled gently by these future humans, who marvel in natural processes and the ecosystems that have restored themselves without human meddling.


7

A 1 meter hole in a dome's superstructure is likely to severely damage something else below it. If you need an "its gonna blow in 5 minutes!" story element, have the impact cause fires that are threatening the Fuel or Oxygen storage. Use the loss of pressurization and escaping atmosphere as something that hinders the efforts to repair the damage. Here are ...


7

The structure wouldn't explode, but it may fall on the colonists. Under normal operation, the colony hab dome expects 1 atm of air pressure inside, and nearly no pressure outside. This is a dramatic difference in air pressure, and the dome is a large, complex structure made from the lightest high-tension materials possible: A vast network of cabling that ...


5

The top priority will be fertility. They will need 3-5 children per couple, perhaps more if the planet is dangerous (native life, environment, whatever). With only 500 people, that's not nearly enough to bring along all the specialties required for a modern civilization... Charles Stross has speculated on his blog that that's north of 100,000 distinct, ...


4

Remote access and life support tanks You stick the squishy breakable human in a tube in a bunker that keeps him alive and remote link his brain to a robot body. This way even if the robot is wiped out, the human survives. Whatever squishy human bits you stick in a robot body is still going to have to deal with extremes that it was never meant to handle. ...


3

Cant you obtain a starting supply of oxygen from water itself via electrolisis? I dont know if its the best way to obtain it, but its a way. And you still have to get the rest of the gases to get the atmosphere. Once there, you can get oxygen and food from hidroponic farms (I guess they are not consuming ONLY local fauna)


3

No. But you can construct a scenario where it might. Good design practice would likely be to build a series of double-walled bubbles, airlocked together, and maybe have some sort of active sealer that “clots” when exposed to air. A really cool looking alternative would be to have a big atrium/mezzanine with a giant glasslike wall. If artificial sapphire (...


3

Without communication back it's just simple stranded island scenario. 1: Steady water supply 2: Steady food supply 3: Shelter (Assuming your ships won't be available as long term housing) 4: Elimination/Subjugation of local hostiles. (This can be anything from animals to humanoids) But seeing it is long term and 500 people isn't extremely much you ...


3

The Bosh Reaction The Bosh Reaction lets you turn hydrogen and carbon dioxide into water and graphite. Just by adding hydrogen to Venus, you destroy the atmosphere and create a huge ocean and several meters of ash will cover the ground like snow. The huge amount of graphite might not be desirable, but Venus has basically no water on it, so the new ocean ...


2

Simple economics. The moment we can build generation ships we have the technology to keep pretty much permanent stations in space. Now getting on and off a planet is expensive and time consuming. You also have less control over the weather and such. So where are you going to build your industry? On a planet where you have extra costs getting things in and ...


2

Short answer: Over population and gravity. This is actually considered a genuinely plausible future. The assumptions would be that actual planets may not be hospitable enough to survive on. Despite the obvious advantages of stable ground and a possible atmosphere, most people never consider the affects of gravity on the human body. We can't just live on ...


2

Whipple shield of some sort is definitely most reasonable solution against most hypervolocity projectiles. However, there is broad variaty of designs, and not all Whipple shield have to be necessarily made of thin foil. The essential principle of Whipple shield is that there is enough space between layers of the shield so that the projectile (or fragment) ...


2

CAPTURE AN ASTEROID First we need an Asteroid: Something with a lot of mass, possibly Ceres or Vesta although we could use just about anything with enough mass, like one of the smaller moons of Jupiter, Saturn or Uranus. We place the orbit around Venus. We make the peri-venusian point REALLY close to Venus's atmosphere. Enough so it pulls off a small but ...


2

First of all, you need to distinguish between autotrophs and heterotrophs. Autotrophs do not need oxygen to thrive, they actually dump oxygen as a waste, and our current atmosphere is the result of the "pollution" photosynthetic organisms have caused in billion years of oxygen dumping. Heterotrophs need an oxidizer to be able to survive, and if that ...


2

It seems very likely that Europa has a vast subsurface salt water ocean. Such an ocean would in all likelihood contain some nitrogen as dissolved gas, nitrate or ammonium salts or other more complex amides and amines. Such chemicals could be processed to release the nitrogen for use in a habitat. The exact method would depend on the form that nitrogen takes ...


2

The top priority would be determining if life is present. If life is not present or at least not extensive, but the planet is habitable then they can land and set up home. The top priority would be shelter, but I assume they would have some form of basic shelter with them so the next priority would be food and water production. If the planet is home to ...


2

In my post number 8 in https://historum.com/threads/generation-or-sleeper-ships-which-would-be-the-better-more-realistic-option-for-space-travel.181701/1 I state that with slower than light speed travel the main method of settlement in our solar system would be via many artificial space habitats, and the main method of interstellar colonization would be by ...


2

Researchers would first have to send probes to the planet to determine the likelihood of ELE (Extinction Level Event). You can ship 500 people to a planet, but if they don't predict a massive electrical storm coming along, or fire rain or whatever, the entire population could get wiped. Others have mentioned food, water, etc.. pathogens would be a major ...


2

Don’t Land The only ways that only way it is remotely plausible that a colony ship could travel in space for 500 years and still be intact are either: A) You have Star Trek esque matter replicators on board, on which case you have absolutely no reason to go down to a planet (or to worry about resources once you get there), or B) You have a colony ship ...


2

How good are their robots? 500 people can’t sustain a modern technological base. Without robots you are doomed to a pre-industrial civilization. Therefore your first priority will be to get robot production up and running while keeping most of your population in cryogenic sleep. Once you can manufacture robots, you can manufacture everything else: ...


1

There are various methods out there, some more effective than others. Extract diluted oxygen. There's always air in water, its a given. You would generally extract the air shaking the water, causing the air to escape. That being said, this is not turning water into air, its just removing air that's already there. The Electrolysis Approach. Popular as a ...


1

I suspect the limiting factor here is going to be societal, not technological. People are social; they like to cluster together, and remain within easy distance of friends and families. We wouldn't have a problem finding planets to colonize — there are always individuals who are drawn to the solitary life of an explorer, wandering off to look for discoveries ...


1

The mass of the atmosphere of Venus is round-about 4.8E20 kg. The largest ship ever built is the Seawise Giant at 657,019,000 kg. It would require just 700 billion trips, assuming it could be made to get from here-to-there with cargo at the density of oil. And completely neglecting what it will use for fuel and reaction mass. I would say that's not ...


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