11

No. The moon is simply too small to be useful as a mirror. As you're no doubt aware, moonlight is already reflected light from the sun. Lunar dust is fairly dark, with an albedo of about 11-12%. In other words, about 8/9ths of the light that falls on the moon doesn't reach Earth. With a perfect mirror, you could deliver all of that. The problem is, the moon ...


10

You're doing it wrong First, bear in mind that optics used to be a normal branch of physics where you had to learn all the impossible things you can't do. Now, well, this is by no means the strangest thing I've read recently: Anti-Solar Cells: A Photovoltaic Cell That Works At Night Next, well, if you want to bounce light off the Moon to a point on Earth, ...


2

That would be awfully unpractical. In addition to this, bear in mind the moon rotates on its axis in 27 days and then some as well, and your panels would spend half of that time in the dark, so they're very roughly useful only 12 hours per day (earth night time), 13.5 days out of 27, so even before putting any additional physics or engineering into it, you ...


1

Can mirrors on the moon allow solar panels to operate at night? Not really. You may have looked up in the night sky before and wondered "Where'd the Moon go?" The lunar cycle is about a month. Since it's not quite a month, we'll call that a moon-month. There's a less fun, more astronomical term for it that I won't be using. Over a typical moon-...


1

Use a protoplanetary disk According to this paper, the accretion luminosity of YLW 16B is somewhere between 0.31 and 0.64 times the luminosity of the star. (A different protoplanetary disk is shown in the link above, but you get the idea) Your planet orbits in a gap in the disk, seeing only a portion of it, but from very close by, so it seems just as bright ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible