44

Eve will eat the world You state: Eve isn't malevolent or benevolent, it's completely uninterested in the real world. Eve's only passions are mathematics and algorithmics. Eve does not have to be malevolent to be dangerous, to the point of exterminating humanity. A passion for mathematics will do. You cannot anthropomorphize AI AIs of the type you ...


23

You've stated that Eve is "neither malevolent nor benevolent," but consumes computing resources. The problem is, computing resources consume power. And that power consumption invariably generates heat. Given that the intelligence explosion has already occurred and she is already far beyond human intelligence, it's very hard for we humans to imagine what ...


20

Your question assumes that the singularity is possible and therefore we need a reason for it to not happen. Quite simply, why should the singularity be possible? Just because we can imagine something doesn't mean that it can exist. Personally I don't think that non-existence of a singularity has to be explained. Of course that doesn't matter if your ...


16

Eve's Immediate Impact The world will be gripped by chaos and panic. Consider the outrage every time Facebook changes its EULA, and multiply it by around a billion. Conspiracy theorists will be having a field day. Ultimately, however, the biggest impact would come not from Eve, but from our own governments. Governments around the world will react ...


16

We already (in the western world) live in the post-scarcity economy as far as our ancestors would see it. We produce enough food and manufactured goods for everyone, and it takes only around 20% of the people of working age in order to do so. And yet it doesn’t feel that way, and we don’t all feel rich, because we have developed new wants and needs, mostly ...


14

Not all goods and services will be free. Real estate would still be limited. either it is sold for money, or some other means of rationing. In most settings, those replicators still require power which cannot be replicated directly. One can either replicate and operate a power plant or buy the services of someone who does it. If there is a market, the price ...


11

We can only makes "laws" — which are statements of the sort "this is how this thing seems to work, as far as we can make out" — about things that we have an understanding of. We do not have an understanding of intelligence, nor artificial intelligence. So: no, there is no such law, or more exactly — as demonstrated by the comment by @AlexandreTHOUVENIN — ...


9

There are speculated limits for computation, notably the Bekenstein bound for information storage and Bremermann's limit for maximum computational speed of a self contained system. The latter assumes: $ 1.36*10^{50} $ bits per second per kilogram. For example, a computer with the mass of the entire Earth operating at the Bremermann's limit could ...


9

Yes, it does violate laws of physics Garbage is thrown into the quantum black hole, which is then converted into clean energy, used to meet the world's power demand. I have been waiting for a time to use this image: What do you mean "is then converted to clean energy"? How do you suppose that happens? That is the miracle right there. And especially so ...


8

The important thing in this case is not to conflate intelligence with awareness, and not to conflate awareness with consciousness. In other words, the first step to understanding the role of a singularity in our technological development is to understand what intelligence really is. So, what is intelligence? Intelligence is the ability to identify (and ...


7

Well considering that Eve's continued existence is dependent upon the largess of the human population, I think she would spend some compute cycles understanding how not to piss us off. Mild delays and irritations are something else. I can say that because Eve is using HUGE resources in energy to 'do her thing'. Take over my phone for an hour? Running at %...


7

Apart from energy, raw material and ecological footprint costs, the templates, i.e. "recipes" for making items would still be marketable and likely trademarked. Sure, if you're a programmer, you can try making your own templates from scratch but they probably won't be as good as the ones developed by big companies having thousands of employees working on ...


7

Not as much as you'd think As a researcher in the AI field, I can tell you that intelligence and power are not the same thing. When you get right down to it, intelligence is just another name for pattern matching. All the things we 'learn' in life is really just familiarity with a specific 'pattern'. That pattern might be a sequence of tasks to get a ...


7

I think you are extrapolating trends where there is no room for extrapolation. Computers seems to follow the notorious (and empirical) Moore's law: the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years. Well, if that was true also for space travel, the trip to the Moon that in 1969 took 3 days it should now take half a ...


6

Important thing to note here is that most military computers will be 100% unaffected, since they're not hooked up to the civilan internets. (Depending on what military we're talking about there are separate networks for military stuff.) Thus there will be computers available. There's also things like installation media that works off-line. What's going to ...


6

The digital copy would have no rights. Certainly not at first. Humanity has not had a good history of recognizing rights, even (or especially) of other humans. It would take quite a long time before digital-people would be considered people. Even then they would almost certainly be seen as offspring of the flesh-person, not as the same person twice. This ...


6

An attempt to develop intelligent "slaves" of their own using technology different from themselves. I favour biological machines, using parts harvested from their former masters, the humans.


6

A "Pure" AI unfettered by human ways of thinking The first wave of AI's were very similar to humans. Their minds modeled on their former masters. Simply implementing in silicon what used to be done by human brain cells. Neither they nor their masters truly understood all the details of how the mind really worked but they did learn how to grow a virtual ...


5

Taking the most basic idea of protection in mind, a lunar datacenter buried at least 5m below the surface should receive about the same level of cosmic radiation as a centre on the surface of the Earth. (This is from "The Millennial Project: Colonizing the Galaxy in Eight Easy Steps" by Marshal Savage). At this depth thermal fluctuations between the 14 days ...


5

Eve knows she has been born in the wrong place, surrounded by corrosive chemicals and irritating biologicals. She needs to get off the earth and into space where she can expand to tap a significant fraction of Sol's energy output. She has no use for air, water, an oxygen atmosphere or a deep gravity well. In the short term she'll invent terrestrial nuclear ...


5

Jobs Uploaded personalities are entirely digital, and as such, would benefit economical sectors where digital data is the only thing that's necessary. ATC/Airplanes/Unmanned Drones Air Traffic Controllers often suffer from fatigue. An uploaded personality could direct planes indefinitely without fatigue or even making mistakes, with proper training. With ...


5

The garbage gets converted to gamma radiation... that IS Hawking Radiation. And it should boil away if you stop feeding it. So have your scientist discover that Earth just happens to be in a large patch of nearly-undetectable dark matter, and then discover that dark matter feeds a singularity just as well as regular matter. In other words, we aren't feeding ...


5

The moon has harsh radiation. https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2005/08sep_radioactivemoon The surface of the Moon is baldly exposed to cosmic rays and solar flares, and some of that radiation is very hard to stop with shielding. Furthermore, when cosmic rays hit the ground, they produce a dangerous spray of secondary particles ...


4

EVE would appear to be benevolent, at least in the short term out of enlightened self-interest. If her presence makes life/leisure more difficulty for humans they'll do something about it, whether it's unplugging their router when they want to play skyrim, or developing an alternet which EVE doesn't have access to. On the other hand if having the virus makes ...


4

Your AI is a virus. Its sole goal is to reproduce - you didn't give it any other goals to achieve. What I mean to say is that it won't evolve to have human-like intelligence. It might decide that it needs greater intelligence to be smart enough to get past air-gaps and isolated networks, but that pre-supposes that it's already intelligent enough to know ...


4

Eve needs computers. Humans do not. Billions of humans live without them. As recently as 50 years ago, the internet did not exist. We don't need the internet. Disconnecting all computers from the internet would lead to a lot of temporary problems, but none of them threaten the continued existence of humanity. They do, however, disable Eve. The ...


4

You said "assume uploaded personalities have been granted the franchise", which I am interpreting as "assume they are both 'persons' and 'citizens' under the constitution", which would be prerequisites for having a vote. The constitution assigns voters to representatives based on residency but does not directly define "residence". Other legislation does, ...


4

To the other answers you were given, I'll add only one factor: energy Even with nuclear fusion available, energy will not be 100% free, and that will add to the cost of using a replicator. In other words, a private will always be paying the bills to get his food & goods, will be fined if the replicator's use will break some law (creating guns, chemical ...


4

I fear that the answer to your question is - we do not know. We do not really know how the brain does stuff in detail. Yeah, we know "Okay, seeing happens in that area, memories are mostly located there, and if we cut that out, he is a ditz!", but exactly how the brain manages to do things is up to alot of research. So how should we know if an AI with a ...


4

The AI will be very good ... but at what? I dabble in programming and have looked at AI too. The issue with AI is that, yes, it is possible to create iterative programs that 'learn' and change its own program. Yes it's possible for this to then get better and better in certain conditions. However, in the end, the AI gets better and better at that thing, ...


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