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1

Perhaps take the idea from Christopher's answer and use the pumice as a component in concrete. A trick people use to make concrete canoes is to use hollow glass micro-beads as one of the components. So in your world perhaps you can crunch up your pumice into very small pieces, coat the little pieces with with a resin, or use some sort of surfactant to keep ...


0

You need something to bind the pumice together and seal its pores Pumice doesn't exist in large boat-sized chunks that you can carve into a boat. It's made of smaller pieces of unreliable composition. You need a resin, or a binder like used for concrete, to stick it all together. Then you build a mold to shape the thing, fill the mold, and let it set. ...


2

In addition to all the other answers, do also note that you don't need to necessarily obtain water, all you need is hydrogen and oxygen and you can create water. Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe, but most of it is inconveniently in stars, gas giants or spread tenuously in open space. However hydrogen containing gasses could be obtained ...


0

Most likely other planets. It might not be water, but if it's a sci-fi explanation you're looking for there could be another liquid which we know for certain doesn't harm humans due to extensive science.


4

Bring much more water than you need for drinking. It is handy stuff. Water is good if you are thirsty. It is good for lots of other things too. Your algae will use it to turn CO2 into carbohydrate. It is good radiation shielding. It is good micrometeorite shielding. You can store energy with it, splitting the hydrogen and oxygen and recombining them. ...


1

The "best" plan (imho) would be for the ship(s) to head to a moon (like Europa); mine enough ice/water to fill the ship's tanks; then head out towards the target solar system. Europa (a moon of Jupiter) is thought to have layer of water/ice ~100KM deep. Once the ship(s) leave the inner solar system they could perhaps collect ice (water) from the Oort Cloud ...


9

Comets. Comets have been described as floating balls of dirty ice, and mining comets for water has actually been proposed for space travel and has been used as a source of water and ice in science fiction for decades (the Planet Express crew trying to mine Halley's Comet in Futurama comes to mind).


4

"Are there chunks of ice in space that the ships could collect and use for water?" Saturn and gas giants like it: With an estimated local thickness of as little as 10 m and as much as 1 km, they are composed of 99.9% pure water ice with a smattering of impurities that may include tholins or silicates. The main rings are primarily composed of particles ...


5

As long as the system is closed, it's impossible for matter within the system to be lost. That's the law of conservation of mass - mass cannot be destroyed. So as long as the people in the ship don't do anything stupid like jettison water out of the ship, they'll always have as much water as they started out with. (Well, as much hydrogen and oxygen as they ...


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