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3

Can anyone advise on the problems that could be faced OK, this may seem a little weird but your biggest problem is likely to be lawyers and governments. There are a gazillion laws in multiple national and international courts that you'll be colliding with. Some of these laws involved countries and organizations with competing legal claims over the rights ...


3

If want to go fully Schliemann and destroy what you are researching, just build a ginormous ring of dykes around the Doggerbank ahum, now Doggerland. The land will fall dry, destroying much of what you want to research. But, at least you can do it without all those pesky robots and diving gear... *Reclaiming land this way is not as easy as this answer makes ...


5

You can but you shouldn't. You will be destroying a lot of artifacts, many materials that can be preserved underwater will not take drying out well, underwater sites often have BETTER preservation than on land. Which is why modern archeologists often excavate underwater sites entirely underwater. your boxes will allow large areas to dry out before ...


3

A major challenge would be the pressure and weight of water. At 100 meters deep, it is 110 tons per square meter (or 11 kg per square cm). If your contraption sits at the ocean floor, there will be a lot of pressure to force the silt into the air-filled room. You would need to dig the edges deep down into the bedrock at the bottom of the sea to avoid this. ...


5

When building bridges, foundations are excavated by putting concrete walls, joining them and draining the water. This method could arguably be adapted for working in the sea, and probably will be less destructive than dropping a box of concrete over the area. A similar method was used to build the Hibernia platform, an offshore rig that is 80m tall... but ...


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