New answers tagged

0

The lack of infrastructure would condemn your attempt. And no, "infrastructure" does not just mean the obvious constructed stuff like roads, waterworks, etc. Cultivated, gene-specialized-by-very-long-selective-breeding plants. Remember that corn, wheat, tomatoes, potatoes, even apples DO NOT EXIST in a "completely uncultivated Earth" ALL ...


0

They would have to start by making houses by each other, forming a little kingdom like place but not really one yet. They would soon be able to make fire and bows and arrows to start hunting all withing the first few days. After that they might start professions, so that way others can work on more things like getting to the moon. The first thing that they ...


0

Yes, possibly, if you don’t drop all of your people off at the same time. Let’s consider one person’s lifetime to be equal to 100 hundred years as a rough approximation. Now that we a solid timeframe we can break our task down into two phases: Get to a 1869 tech level Condense the time to go from a 1869 tech level to a 1969 tech level For phase (1) it is ...


1

Not in one lifetime, no As others explained, this is impossible in one lifetime. There is simply too much dependence on technology that takes large amounts of time to step through even if you know what you're doing. But what if we were to relax the "single lifetime" constraint and consider an inter-generational Moon% speedrun? How fast can you go? ...


0

Sure The moon is 384,000 km away. A human has about 50 kg of water. A sphere of radius 400,000 km (rounded up, accounts for radius of Earth, and maybe you want to be on the dark side) has a volume of $\frac{4}{3}\pi r^3$ has a volume of 267946666666666666666666666.66667 cubic meters, which is under 10^27 tonnes of water. 20 humans weigh more than a tonne. ...


-1

If you lower the planet's gravity then the task becomes much easier. For example titan has a mass of 0.0225 Earths and surface gravity of 0.138g. This gives it an escape velocity of 2.64 km/sec and an orbital velocity of 1.87km/sec. This means that the WW2 era V2 rocket would be an orbital class rocket and you could send any WW2 era plane into orbit with a ...


2

Impossible to sent by building an Apollo equivalent project in that timeframe. I agree with the tons of written stuff here explain why not. It is more possible to build a true monster-gigantic classic catapult at the highest mountain or by using round-spin force from a large set of air balloons to launch one human encapsulated at a protective shell than ...


5

You could do it instantly (although you might think my answer is a bit cheap): "Imagine you have a large population of adolescent humans (as large as you need) " I will take enough adolescent humans that they cover the entire Earth and then pile up on top of eachother all the way to the moon. Have a nice day.


1

While I'm inclined to agree with many of the responses, they omit one factor that may be important - the question doesn't ask us to re-create the Apollo mission, but rather to place one person on the Moon. There's no requirement for safety or repeatability, and so it would be possible to achieve the goal with a craft far more primitive than 20th-century ...


10

No, even if you have a magic Wikipedia type thing for "Starting with modern-day knowledge... " rather than relying on people knowing stuff. (And most modern knowledge is, in fact, simply knowing how to use existing infrastructure.) I see lots of other good answers, but it all really comes down to the basics: Food, shelter, water. Most of your ...


54

It can't be done. There's a famous phrase in project management, "Nine women cannot make a baby in one month." This is one of those cases where you just can't parallelize enough. The project management term you should be interested in is called the "critical path." This is the longest sequence of activities that have to be done in ...


16

I would say no due to issues of food production. The problem is not clearing enough land or having manpower. The real problem would be in breeding good enough strains of crops and livestock to feed a large population, the situation would be different if they had seeds and draft animals with them but without that I would claim it is extremly unlikely.


98

Impossible This is an extension of, or complement to, L.Dutch's answer, which was first. I upvoted it. So should you. I'm fond of reminding people that 99.99% of the technology we enjoy today was invented in the last 150 years. Based on that observation, one could jump to the conclusion that what you're asking is possible, perhaps even plausible. But that ...


2

Yes - because you've cherry picked people that better than anyone on Earth currently. I'll get into what I mean by cherry picking soon, but first Some simplifying assumptions I've made: You did say put a man on the moon in their lifetime. You didnt say it had to be one of the original settlers walking on the moon. Cherry-picking the best of Earth they'll ...


6

NASA sent people to the Moon using different bases (launch was in Cape Canaveral, command in Houston). Each base had an enormous amount of infrastructure already in place. Your people will have to build mines, labs, refineries, regular roads, rail roads etc. Even with all insfrastructure in place, that takes time. If you think it's slow because of ...


78

I don't think it's feasible. First of all, for anything they need, they might know what they need to build, but they have no way to reach the place where the raw materials are located. E.g. Jim: "cool, we need gasoline to supply our trucks to transport materials." Pedro: "To make gasoline we need oil" Alexa: "Where can we find oil,...


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