37

Sure it is, and we can use modern technology to do it (NB: This relies on being able to see into the future further than the OP requirement, but if that's an acceptable change in scale, this would work.) So, have you ever heard of an RSA token? These are devices that work on the basis of giving you a passcode that changes every 30 seconds or so; similar to ...


20

Is there something like an explosive effect I can achieve? Oh yes. Given the handy metre-cube limit, lets think about the energy required to raise the temperature of that volume of liquid water at ambient temperature (say, 20 degrees C) to 8000K. Lets say it is a nice round tonne of water. Specific heat capacity of water is 4181J/kg, so you need about ...


15

Reaction times Average reaction times for most people are roughly 200 ms for simple responses. If you can see 100 ms into the future, your reaction time is going to be roughly half that. So have something like a "Simon Says" type decoder that requires hitting a sequence of light-up buttons within an extremely short reaction window. Of course, electronics ...


12

It's "Heisencoded": your message is only there when no one is looking at it. The more closely you observe it, the less intelligible it becomes. This includes electronic observations. However, people can blink - closing and reopening their eyes in about 0.1 seconds - to make the message momentarily "unobserved". Your temporally-gifted individual can thus ...


10

Asimov wrote some stories about a substance, the thiotimoline, which is so soluble in water that is dissolves before touching the liquid, thus seeing the future. This as a consequence of the substance complex structure, which fold the space time allowing the molecule to see the future. In Asimov's writings the endochronicity of thiotimoline is ...


9

Falling down a K hole. It is hard to keep from responding to the world - especially if someone hurts you to see if you are faking. But it is a lot easier with drugs. Ketamine is used to achieve this state. https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-a-k-hole-21861 Ketamine is a dissociative drug. In simple terms, dissociative drugs make users feel detached ...


8

We have some examples in our real world of pushing back the ocean, just to cite a few: The Dutch Afsluitdijk The Afsluitdijk (literally translated: Shut-off-dike) was completed in 1932, thereby shutting off the Zuiderzee (lit: Southern Sea) from the North Sea. Until then, the Zuiderzee had been a large bay south of the North Sea which gave maritime ...


7

Plausible? No. Works for a story? Sure. That's not to say it couldn't form a good premise for a soft sci-fi short, or something of that nature, or perhaps a background for a dystopian setting. But there are just two many problems to deal with here for this to be plausible. DNA. This gets addressed a lot in xenobiology questions, but there's no reason to ...


5

"[...] into the future, or at least the most likely future." If less likely futures are game, then this is solvable. Encrypt the message and destroy the key. At the press of a button, generate a random key from true random numbers, and try to decrypt with it. The seer will be able to see the vanishingly unlikely future in which the random key guess ...


5

One, instantly zapping a cubic meter of just about anything to 8000 K is going to be a major explosion. You can amplify the destructive effect to a specific area by applying more fun physics. For example, in a fantasy setting, a glacier fortress was built around a nearly impervious stone geode suspended in the glacier. Superheating the geode (through magical ...


5

It is essentially a binary language, just like what machines use. Unless they never stop vocalising, it isn't really binary as you have O, U and silence. Binary signals just have high and low, or on and off. Tri-state stuff is distinguished from plain old binary. How can each word be differentiated without any pauses between words? So, study of spoken ...


4

The closest thing we build looking like what you describe are nuclear submarines. They can spend a lot of time underwater, taveling around at various depths, and considering their crew they could be seen as small villages. However they depend on land for their sustenance: supplies, fuel and obviously crew all come from there. In principle it would be ...


4

Moons of gas giants tend to be tidally locked. They are also tidally heated. So there you have it. Go for thermal energy. Alternatively: if you can build teleporting gates, what is keeping you from building a Dyson sphere around your star? Ditch the gas giant and go for the mother lode.


4

If they can change from weighted to weightless at will but retain their inertia, then they will be able to travel extremely fast by becoming weighted, diving to gain speed, then becoming weightless and using that speed to climb higher than they started. Humans free fall at a little over 100 mph, so they would be able to attain this speed in a dive, but over ...


4

as @L.Dutch already say theres many country do this. the method https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_reclamation Land reclamation can be achieved with a number of different methods. The most simple method involves filling the area with large amounts of heavy rock and/or cement, then filling with clay and dirt until the desired height is reached. ...


4

If by "weightless" you mean that the net force pulling their body is zero, they are for all practical purposes human-shaped baloons. There are toys that are just like that: remote-controlled helium-filled balloons with fins. They are more aerodynamic than a person, but given how little viscous and dense air is, the speed for a human air-swimmer should be ...


4

If you had a perfect laser (aka doesn't disperse over any distance, not actually possible but still) you could just shine it on a distant object (or mirror) and encode the message in it. The only way to read it while in transit in space is to intercept it, requiring FTL or similar


4

I would place the message in a way that reading it would mean instant death to whoever reaches it (for instance, in the walls of a deeeep pit, just before reaching the bottom or a box filled with poisonous gas). This way, if you can see the future, you could intend on walking that path, read the message just before dying (in the future) and then change your ...


5

Afaik, 8000K is significantly higher than the temperatures reached by any chemical reaction. As such, instantaneously heating a ton of whatever matter to 8000K definitely gives a larger explosion than a 1 ton TNT bomb. The military will be very interested in your skills. If we remove that limit, the explosion gets larger. This is proven by all the nuclear ...


4

How does your superheating work? First, you need to decide on what your superheating skill is like. Transmission speed: You said it transmits at the speed of light. Transmission distance: Line of sight? Mental image of area? Anywhere on the planet? Superheating time: How long does it take to get from 20°C to your 8000°C? Is it like 'bam' instantaneous, or ...


3

The only thing I can think of would be to use some manner of "invisible ink" whose presence and almost instant evaporarion were both invisible to the naked eye, but the overlapping presense of both simultaneously created a visible hue (so, only someone "flipbook viewing" both the present and the next moment would see it). Of course, the reader would have to ...


3

Deaths all at once is tricky. You need the virus to turn deadly everywhere, all at once. Otherwise there will be quarantines, research and all that. Similar to this question: How could a seemingly-harmless virus become deadly at a predetermined date and time? Even with rapid and unnoticed spread, there will be many months between initial and final ...


3

Let's do some Geo-Engeneering Others have already proposed the sane ways for doing land reclamation, which leaves me with the insane ways of doing it. A question, dear reader, is this enough reclaimed land for your purposes? This looks somewhat like current Earth, but all the continents seem to have gotten fat. The most noticeable changes are the now ...


3

If by weightless but still have mass you mean they are light as air, they would also behave like air. In the sense of, they would get thrown around by wind a lot and would have trouble maintaining direction and speed. If they are NOT as weak as they are light, then they might flail around a bit more rapidly to "swim" around at a decent pace, but again, the ...


3

One kinda hilarious answer involve quantum mechanics and being able to observe effects "too soon". I mean, I'm not an expert on quantum mechanics, but from what I understand, it's observation that collapses the waveform down. If you did the double-slit experiment, but were able to "see" where the photon would hit before it actually reached the double slit ...


3

1) How can the ability to heat portions of matter to high temparatures be used as a weapon, if I cannot affect the opponent's body matter directly and I need to minimize the number of heating instances and volume? As you have been aswered by @AlexP, you can case explosions up to tons of TNT equivalent. It is very dangerous to youself as you cann't know for ...


3

Initial issues: To reach 777.7 m, assuming no air resistance, and a similar gravity to that of the earth, the water will need to move at a speed of 123.4 m/s this is just over 1/3 the speed of sound (275 mph). This is really fast, and would cause a lot of destruction (depending on the size of the geyser). If we factor in atmospheric resistance, you'll ...


2

Why is it a terrible idea? Because organic things aren't good at fighting. Humans were built with endurance in mind. We're incredibly resilient. If we suffer scratches or nicks, we can heal them up in a few days. Deeper cuts can be healed and replaced with tough scar tissue after a few weeks. Broken bones? No problem - those can be healed as well. Internal ...


2

First your premise that they won't "by trying too hard to detect a fake": As some one who has had a lot of CTs and MRIs: they may not find minute damage (esp. to axions) in patients who have brain injuries. However, they will do a CT & MRI right away and probably several different ones. This is because they will need to rule out bleeding in the brain ...


2

If the question is "Would MRI scans reveal that this person is in fact NOT brain damaged"? Pretty much, yes. The main thing that would be a giveaway is the brains response (as in brain activity) in certain parts ( https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1647299/ ) to hearing, pain, etc. There is no way (at least that I've found) to ignore this to fake ...


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