10

Robots Maybe it is a stretch to call robots a "species", but when it comes to owing their rise to humans, they fit the bill perfectly. In your future world, humans may have achieved a state where robotic automation becomes so good that robots can reproduce and adapt on thier own. Some robots mine, some run the factories, some distribute goods, etc. They ...


9

All current answers are too mammal-centric. My nomination would be the birds. If you want to breed for intelligence, tool use and problem-solving, you don't want dogs or even cats - you want crows. They are the first animal ever seen to construct complex tools (defined as a tool with more than one element). Crows are fully omnivorous, and will eat ...


6

I kinda feel like the various monkeys/apes are the best candidate - albeit a pretty boring one. Some scientists already consider that they have entered Stone Age and that's the furthest any species has got so far. With humans out of the picture - well, it's just a matter of time. Mind you, I don't know how much of human presence would still remain by the ...


5

Intelligence is nothing more than an evolutionary tool. Because it is our main tool, we are biased in saying that it is different and we overvalue, after all, we cannot run very well, we have no claws, inoculate poison, keep alive in very adverse situations, etc. Our intelligence is the product of the 16 billion neurons in the prefrontal cortex, which added ...


5

Extinction of most creatures. Most food webs in our world are sustainained by photosynthetic organisms, photo being the key here. Without light, plants can't make photosynthesis, new organic matter can't be created and food chains will collapse, most likely resulting into the extinction of most species who rely, directly or indirectly, on plants, algae, ...


3

In some ways radio's are a 1920's era technology. (Radio waves discovered in 1886, commercialized by 1900, widespread use by the 1920's, spark gap then AM radios first, followed by the FM radio being invented in 1933, then cellular radio's taking off for mobile communications in the 80's leading to the 2G,3G,4G, and now 5G, Satellite comms. etc.) What is ...


2

You'll need a few components to make it work effectively, but most importantly, you'll need a series of transmitters and receivers, so that they can send and receive messages and communicate (plus some way to power the equipment, of course, which might be the hardest part). You'll likely want to use AM frequencies to get a longer reach and thus requiring ...


2

I don't know about transmitters, so I'll skip those. Receivers are easy Soldiers during WW2 would commonly make their own radios using whatever they had lying around in their foxholes. Interference keeps transmissions local We use radio because radio wave frequencies aren't readily absorbed or interfered with by the atmosphere. So change the composition ...


2

Radio broadcasting and receiving is easy There are over 15,000 radio stations in the United States (15,330 according to Google), and millions of radio receivers in cars, houses and people's hands that can receive their signals. Then add in the ham radio community, the police and emergency services radio networks, CB (citizens band) radios/walkie talkies ...


2

Another answer from me, from a different perspective. I just re-read your criteria: how much what we would leave behind might shorten the species's evolutionary journey to sentience. So, that's actually pretty specific. What in all our stuff would push a species to evolve higher intelligence? This immediately lays down some groundwork: first, there has ...


1

Using protocols like PSK31 its possible to send low speed text communications around the globe with only a few watts of transmit power and some loose wire as an antenna. The transmitter and receiver are just an ordinary cheap ham radio plus some software that could run on a $0.50 cent micro controller. "PSK31 is distinguished from other digital modes in ...


1

In terms of mankind's presence passively helping another species achieve sapience, there probably wouldn't be any species that fit your criteria. Humans haven't been creating strong selection pressures for higher intelligence, and the only way our presence would help another species achieve sapience is if we outright uplifted them. There have been ...


1

It will depend a lot on the world itself and it's problems. Let's say, for example, that the monsters come out mostly at night. In this case "I'll be back before dawn" is an effective way to say bye while also signaling "I'll return". Defining how your monsters work and the state of the world is important, as these things will be important in how culture ...


1

As John O said, ready-to-use ammunition will quickly become rare. But it's not hard to refill your own cartridges. Plenty of people do it now, sometimes it's cheaper than buying new ammo. I would check outdoor shooting ranges. The firing line will probably have some empty brass lying around, and the backstop, if it's dirt or sand, will probably have tens ...


1

So some chimpanzees and monkeys are already in the stone age. ( http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150818-chimps-living-in-the-stone-age ) Assuming that the loss of humanity didn't also wipe out the primates one of those is likely to step up to fill the niche, but that will likely take many millennia. IN the interim as others have suggested, large predators ...


1

If you're looking for a species to become the new humans, I think cats are really your best choice. They don't have many natural enemies, can adapt to a wide range of climates, and have other biological benefits that other answers have already explained. There's more to it than biology, though. You don't rise to the point of being a diverse planet's ...


1

Because of mankind's huge impact on the planet and the environment, generally speaking I think the species that would benefit most from mankind's departure are those that are close to the fringes, such as the endangered species in the fragile parts of the polar ice caps, rain forests, wetlands, etc. For example polar bears might be one of the largest ...


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