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According to Ian Mortimer in The Time Traveller's Guide to Medieval England in XIV century England had about 200 cities or towns with total of about 300 000 inhabitants and had 2,5 million inhabitants in total (urbanisation per cent equal to 12) . 5 biggies cities are (with their estimated inhabitants) London 40k York 12,1k Bristol 10,6k Coventry 8k ...


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Use a set of spheres-of-influence around points of interest, rather than a single sliced sphere This suggestion challenges the OP concept of dividing the entire sphere into sectors, offering an alternative which can be explained using in-game logic and is comparable to the way real life international law treats territories, territorial waters and ...


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Since distance is rather important, division based on Voronoi cells seems appropriate. Perhaps with modified metrics/topology based on "jump points" or whatever. This however won't give you equal volume cells without some modifications.


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Here's one way: No 'supercities' of millions as we know them: Those require transport, banking, food preservation, sanitation, and communications that simply were unknown then. What they called 'cities' we today call 'towns' - only a few thousand inhabitants. Mighty Imperial Constantinople had a paltry few hundred thousand (today that's Des Moines, Iowa ...


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Straightforward calculation The initial number of females is N. You pick N. Ten, one hundred, one thousand, your choice. The average life span is S. You pick S. Twenty, thirty years. Each year, an average of D = N / S females will die. (D stands for deaths.) Remember that this is the average life span; it must take into account horrible child mortality, ...


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What you probably need is a simple math equation that can give you a hint of how fast the populations will grow. I'm not a mathematician, so this was all I could find: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logistic_function#In_ecology:_modeling_population_growth Also found these links. Don't know if they can be of any help or if you have already checked them out: ...


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Population sustainability in this scenario is not as hard as you think. Firstly, yes there was a high infant mortality rate in older times, but that doesn't mean that it was all the babies that were considered sickly to begin with. Many of those babies would die of disease or even things like what we now call SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome) and would ...


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Whilst I appreciate it's not exactly what you had in mind, I think the Demographic Transition Model will go a long way in helping you work out what you need relative to your own starting population. This is a measure of development, and reflects population growth as an area begins to put more into things like healthcare and become a civilised society. ...


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Finesse population. I am struck by /a significant enough population in the game so the population of a sector isn't decimated in a single fleet battle / If a consequence of a fleet battle is deaths on the planet surface (!), I do not think a population of 5000 will be instrisically more resistant than a population of 500,000 as regards this sort of death ...


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50 billion people The Netherlands is one of the densest populated countries on the Earth, yet also a net exporter of food (and I believe that the farming methods used are, in the main, sustainable). Nor does the Netherlands seem overpopulated; the cities are low and open, and there is lots of canals and forests. It is not hard to imagine that with advanced ...


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It depends on your definition of sustainability. If you mean it in the sense that the natural ecology remains in balance, the answer is probably less than we have now. I think I saw someone cite 3.8 billion once, but it's anyone's guess really. I personally think that number is a little low, because current production expects growth, not stasis. You don'...


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There's always "room for one more", but why would you want to push the envelope? The real question should be: given a world with a long-term stable population, is there any justification or advantage for this population to be greater than 1 billion? Larger populations mean less room to accommodate emergencies and even long term environmental changes. ...


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I think the main issue is how aggressive these nomads are. As has been mentioned, there have been huge groups of nomads through history that sustained very high numbers, such as Huns, Mongols, and even Vikings, however they were largely warlike or predatory groups. More peaceful nomads, such as the Roma or Celtic blacksmiths, were often much smaller in size. ...


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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genghis_Khan Genghis Kahn is the first thing that comes to mind. And according to wiki he lead an army of 100.000 people at some point. So it is not strange to think that the population of Mongolia at that time must have been quite big too, bigger than 100k least. Another nomadic tribe or tribes were the Huns https://en.m....


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