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28

This practice makes no sense. There is no reason to do this, in the Arctic you can store food nearly indefinitely, they should never be be planning for starvation, it should only occur in extremely rare emergencies (like a fire in the food stores). If there is enough food to fatten people up there is enough to store, keep in mind we burn most of our ...


26

Remember that altitude is much more efficient than latitude in cooling the local climate. If you had a generally coolish world and highlands around the equator, you could have everything higher than, say, 10,000 feet glaciated.


17

The planet might have a 90° axial tilt. That means each pole will be in direct sunlight for half a sidereal year and in shadow the other half year. The equator will receive exactly 50% sunlight and 50% nighttime each day. But it will still experience drastic seasons, because over the course of a year the sun's height at noon will vary from perfect zenith ...


14

The Custom of the Sea applies Though in your case it's the custom of the ice. The custom of the sea allows the survivors to agree to resort to cannibalism to survive a shipwreck without the usual penalties associated with killing (and eating) someone on return to civilisation. First you eat those who are dead or dying anyway. Then you draw lots. This ...


14

No. There's nothing like enough energy in nuclear fallout to melt the ice caps.


13

Make the axial tilt of the planet be parallel to its orbital plane Uranus does this already with an axial tilt of about 97 degrees off orbital plane though this isn't a great example because Uranus is just cold all the time. All it's a gas giant while the OP is implying a rocky planet. Torque required to keep the hot pole pointing towards the star The ...


11

No. as Mike Scott already answered there's simply not enough energy in the nuclear materials in the fallout to make a dent in the temperature or entire ice masses. It would be hard to provide numbers even if the number of warheads and amount of nuclear materials weren't classified, since it's very hard to predict how much of which radioactive isotope would ...


11

Certainly. I will assume by desert you mean "hot and arid" rather than just arid. A planet could obviously be entirely frigid with the poles significantly more arid than the rest of the planet. One possibility could be a cold planet with limited volcanic activity which, for whatever reason, is only observable or easily measurable near the poles. The ...


11

Have an axis tilt [1] over 56° or under 124° Between these points the poles and the equator switch climate. Technically speaking the poles simply have a higher thermal insolation average per year than the equator. This graphic [5] shows the relationship between axial tilt (obliquity) and the yearly average temperature (insolation) for a given latitude. ...


7

There are many problems with your scenario, human meat is not worth what is put into it. So the food these people consumed is of much more value than their meat. Relying on and planning for cannibalism to prevent starvation is not a good survival strategy for any community and is inherently unstable and that society is heading for collapse, so we'll set ...


7

Starting with the Earth as a template: Move it closer to the sun Reduce axial tilt Add thick rings Rings around a planet like Earth would last a few million years at best, but we've been around for less time than that. The poles would be hot due to star proximity. The rings would reduce radiation on and close to the equator, making it cold.


6

Yes, it's entirely possible. Your planet would have a pretty extreme axial tilt, something like 50- or 60-plus degrees. You would see the following effects: The poles would have extremely long 'days' equal to years, as we currently see on earth. The difference is that during the summer, the 24-hour sunlight would be much, much warmer, potentially warm ...


6

There's only one way I can think of to do it, and it's pretty implausible The reason Earth's polar regions are cold are: It's orbiting around one star, heat comes from only one direction. It rotates, which means the least amount of heat is applied at the "edges" of the planetary face currently facing the star. It's axial tilt is kinda straight up-and-down (...


5

Have you considered a Sitnikov planet? Image courtesy of Scholarpedia user Christoph Lhotka under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License. A Sitnikov planet moves on an axis, perpendicular to the orbital plane of two binary stars. It oscillates along this axis, gradually moving up and down. While it's on one half of the journey, one pole ...


4

My answer is that history has shown us that this isn't possible without disaster for the ecosystem. So many times there has been attempts at introducing new species for various reasons and I cannot think of one instance where this has not gone haywire in one way or another. Sometimes in ways you wouldn't expect. So the polar bears might eat the emperor ...


4

Eat the fit one In a polar context, fat is a key for survival. A fat body protects from the cold, and helps survive the hard times without food. Think about animals stocking a lot of fat before winter. So the fat ones are the more likely to survive extreme situations like a long period without food. They should eat the fit ones, who have more risk to ...


4

A great answer provided by a colleague. I was reminded that an astronaut on the moon is still obeying Earth orbital mechanics where this problem has already been figured out. In orbit, the direction toward the center of the Earth is known as Radial, opposite is Antiradial, and the directions orthogonal to radial along the orbit path are known as Prograde and ...


4

Two stars orbiting each other with a planet in between. The planet is tidally locked to both stars so each pole always faces 'its' star. As some have pointed out this system is not 'naturally' stable. But, in the comments, Jose Antonio Dura Olmos suggested an intriguing notion that could introduce a dizzying array of potential plot points - the system is ...


4

Considering Earth as a template planet, probably not. If the seas of your planet are molten lava, their temperatures would be in the 700-1200 °C. Let's assume 850 °C as an average. That is hotter than the mean surface temperature of Venus. Since lava usually contains greenhouse gases, your planet would be probably be a Venus on steroids, and its temperature ...


4

Some expansion on this comment: Slap a thick enough atmosphere on your planet (earth + 25% at least) and create Tibetian-like highlands all around your equator, while eliminating axial tilt to create moderate climate. Plus, huge continents around the poles with next to no precipitation. Remove axial tilt - Why? Because this removes most of the seasonal ...


3

I don't think so. Back when Earth looked something like this: there'd be no possibility for anything like a cold polar region. In those times, the atmospheric temperatures were something like 2000̊ C. Not really conducive to nippy polar conditions!


3

Your planet is actually a moon with one side always facing a hot gas giant. One side of the planet would always get warmed up by the gas giant and would have two day-like periods where the sun rises on the horizon, then sets behind the gas giant, then rises from behind the gas giant and sets on the other side of the horizon, giving an effect similar to a ...


3

Not counting ice as desert. The most northern desert in North America is Ashcroft, British Columbia 50° 43′ 32″ N, 121° 16′ 50″ W. I think this is the desert closest to a pole. Obviously not counting Antartica but let's say that wind patterns were such that a section of Antarctica was free of ice it would have to be a Hamada right? I am going to say ...


2

One way to solve this would be to look at the way we have reconciled calendars in the Western Europe. We have on one hand the Gregorian calendar and on the other the catholic feasts calendar. The difference is especially visible for the date of Easter which is a date calculated and not based on astronomical observations. Similarly they could have the ...


2

Are you going to measure the temperature at the planet's surface? It is required for your planet's pole to be warmer than OUR equator but not ITS OWN equator? If so, maybe this could work for you. You don't need any special orbit for your rocky planet, just make it closer to its star. This way both poles will be warmer. In fact, the whole planet will become ...


2

For an Earthlike world in an Earthlike orbit you'd need about 1.4*10^27Nm of torque annually to get the axis of rotation to precess 360 degrees per year which is what you're asking for, that's going to produce 1.4*10^27j of waste heat. To put that in perspective one megaton is 4.18*10^15j so you get the equivalent of 291,666,666,666 million tons of TNT worth ...


2

This is very difficult to pull off with normal physics, because of the reasons why poles are typically cooler: There is little direct sunlight constantly heating the poles. The magnetosphere holds less atmosphere near the poles, meaning there is less insulation in those places. Heat radiating outward has less atmosphere to get through. Counterintuitively, ...


2

For a polar centric solution it has to be an azimuthal projection, they would not normally be "square", it would not make sense (unless as a joke). Take a look at the United Nations Logo for a Whole World example https://www.quora.com/What-are-polar-projection-maps-used-for There are many variations but a "Lambert zenithal equal-area projection" for each ...


2

If you don't insist that your polar desert be hot, look no further than Earth. The South Polar Plateau in Antarctica is one of the most arid landmasses on Earth, with annual precipitation of about 7 cm of snow (convert that to liquid, and that's drier than the Atacama Desert in Chile and Peru). The northern ice cap is similarly arid, though it's harder to ...


1

Eat the old ones The old ones can't work that much any more, so if they get to eat as much as the rest then they might just get fatter. On the other hand, it is also more likely they get ill, and they would die anyhow. You'll need the young people - whether fat or skinny - to replace your population. On another note, I'm not sure "fit" in a polar region ...


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