12

Every organism needs energy of some sort to survive. There are two basic strategies: go to where the energy is or wait for it to come to you. Both have advantages depending on how plentiful and mobile said energy source is, especially when you consider competition and predation, so it's reasonable to assume you'd find both. Keep in mind that once you have ...


7

Scientists already have done something like this by mixing genes of plants with genes extracted from bio-luminescent bacteria. For example, this research paper and this article describe the creation of bioluminescent tobacco plants by injecting DNA from Photobacterium leiognathi into Nicotiana tabacum. It looks like the plants glowed green instead of blue, ...


7

Trees actually do have a circulatory system already. It's called the Vascular System. It works rather well too because it can support trees much larger than we are and get nutrients up through the roots all the way out to the leaves to support new growth, and oxygen from the leaves all the way down to the roots to keep the entire organism alive. In point of ...


7

What you're describing is not a stupid plot convenience at all and there is already some GM research attempting to make existing crop plants more salt tolerant by crossing them with plants like mangrove trees and seaweed that have different strategies for either resisting salt intake through acidic roots, or methods to excrete it like mangrove trees to. This ...


6

Not really an option the way you want it, where it is always on fire. Fire takes a LOT of energy that the tree needs to build up over time. Let's build a situation where it might make sense to exist with limited time: On the continent of Worse Than Australia, funghi and various insects are a huge threat for plant life. They infest trees and kill them over ...


5

Before the accident, she was working on natural solutions to lizard infestation problem. She genetically engineered a plant that smells like good food to lizards, but produces a neurotoxin that kills lizards when they eat it. Genetic engineering cannot do that now, but you are talking about 30th century.


5

As L.Dutch says, you need heat, but heat isn't incompatible with plantlife. Consider the eucalyptus. Now the eucalyptus isn't just a passive pyrophyte like some, no, it's an active pyrophyte. The eucalyptus pumps flammable oils into the air around it to make fires more common and bigger. Pyromaniac trees The right weather conditions, a dry thunderstorm ...


4

My first thought about your description is that perhaps this would not be a place for plants, for the reasons discussed in the comments even. Vegetables may not thrive so well in such a place, with unlimited reserves of an energy source that vegetables produce for themselves, in fact, the entire planet by itself appears to be a plant by itself, which makes ...


4

Kind of depends on the weather. If it rains in this world, there are already plants that can live there with practically no modification. Air plants don't need soil at all (sometimes you see them sold on crystals at Whole Foods). Bamboo just uses the ground as a kind of place to anchor while it absorbs water from the soil (the one that has been on my ...


4

Pretty much like any other plant. Until you look really closely. Some relevant considerations are as follows: A silicone-based tree will require both a carbon source and a silicon source--however, because carbon plays such a reduced biochemical role (have been replaced in many functions by silicone polymers), the carbon source need not be as accessible. ...


4

Definitely read up on Daniel and the Dragon. https://www.gotquestions.org/Bel-and-the-Dragon.html In the brief but autonomous companion narrative of the dragon (Daniel 14:23–30), "There was a great dragon which the Babylonians revered."[8] In this case the supposed god is no idol, but an animal. However, Daniel slays the dragon by baking pitch, fat,...


4

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: So: there already exists the art/science of grafting, where a small plant cutting or branch is fastened to a second compatible plant and continues to grow there. Typically when it comes to trees this is done with citrus fruits such as orange, lemon and lime, but apples aren’t that far away (evolutionarily speaking) from the ...


4

Possible but not likely for a number of reasons: Plants don't interbreed unless they have a recent (for varying values of recent) common ancestor. Also, the ancestor should, in fact be an actual apple tree since you want a similar fruit. It could develop a similar looking fruit on its own but that just makes it more unlikely to happen. Also, an apple is ...


4

A lot will depend on the "surface" weather, especially regarding winds. In the absense of winds, the most successful plants will be those that can grow the longest leaf-bearing stalks down into the abyss (though somehow "abyss" seems wrong for an endlessly sunlit void). Those with longer stalks will of course be able to get more sun than those with shorter ...


4

Your aliens live in a reducing atmosphere. The atmosphere is methane, ethane and ammonia at temperatures comparable to earth. Water is scarce as you say. Oxygen is toxic to them. The liquids in their body are a combination of ammonia and long chain alkanes, like hexane. They are very flammable and potentially even explosive in an oxygen atmosphere. ...


4

Sugars are energy even for a plant. Having so much sugars around is like having free lunch every day. Trouble is that the table might be crowded. Plant would need to develop a lot more symbiotic relations with the surrounding bacteria than usual. I imagine that such world would be swamped by bacteria and insects.


3

Nature provides this solution. There are too many to list, but there are hundreds of plants that do well in low-light conditions. In fact, even among normal plants such as English ivy you can notice it adapting to low-light. You can see this sometimes by looking at the size of the leaves near the center of a bush or tree: To compensate for most light being ...


3

This (seasonal low light) issue already has a solution in nature. Deciduous plants, migratory birds and hibernating animals are well adapted to a drastic change of seasons. More interesting question would be - if there are hot summers and relatively warm winters, how things would be different? I suspect there would be much higher activity of wood eating ...


3

There exists a thing called the oak apple gall. The galls are produced by a larval insect which hijacks the oak tree to make itself a case to grow in. Instead of some genetically cumbersome mix of parasitic plant and apple tree, have there be oak galls that are edible. I can imagine an insect which does the same thing and creates an apple-like ...


3

Dragons will almost certainly have unusual metabolism. After all, they're huge, they can fly, and they breathe fire. Something unusual there. So it is also unsurprising that they will have certain sensitivities. For example, you can eat a pound of raisins and have no particular health issues. (Apart from, possibly, needing to stay close to a toilet for a ...


3

Females might get around more. In general, females of any species invest more energy in offspring than males. Eggs require more resource investment than sperm. This is true for pollinators too. If a female needs more energy, it must go get it. Assuming pollinators are visiting flowers for food, a female might visit more flowers than a male: it needs ...


3

Ultimately, the answer you seek lies in Enzymes. These are essentially biological catalysts that greatly increase the rate of specific biochemical reactions in the body. Tie this to a hormone, like Estrogen (which is found in greater levels in females) and you have a biological catalyst that may only occur in female pollinators. The mechanism would be that ...


3

You may turn this into a greenhouse structure instead. However, the "glass roof" will be inside the "floor" structure, which is a giant tube or a dyson sphere. The roofing will be valuable in keeping all things within, including the precious atmosphere. The system, however, looks like an inverted greenhouse to its dwellers. Plants hang from a hard-material ...


3

I’m going to assume that the blood in the lakes and rivers is only red blood cells. White blood cells wouldn’t survive in the open as there would be unlimited bacteria/viruses to fight against. Blood will naturally latch onto oxygen that’s in the air and carry the oxygen with it. That’s what blood does. Note that blood deeply submerged in a lake would not ...


3

To create a cyclone you need a source of heat to make air rise on a reasonable large area. Something akin to the storm of fires created by incendiary bombing in WWII. This means that your tree has to: generate a significant amount of heat be spread on a rather large area Normally generating heat above a certain extent is incompatible with life, so if your ...


2

Nothing need be done to modify the nature of terrestrial plants to live in your world. Plants are as active (though not ambulatory) and have as much agency as animals. In fact there's the idea that plants mostly tolerate animals because they help move seeds and pollen around. Plants can be tough bastards. Look at the moss living in tundra or the titanic ...


2

As stated in other remarks, plants already possess vascular systems. They also possess mechanisms for responding to stimuli and for cellular communication (like this, for example). But that's a long ways off from the sort of circulatory system found in animals involving muscles and a nervous system. So, why might plant life evolve like that? Perhaps to ...


2

There are glowing fungi. Why not plants? https://news.mongabay.com/2013/06/why-bioluminescent-fungi-glow-in-the-dark/ “Why do luminescent mushrooms, all of which emit light 24 hours per day, which must be an energy consumptive process, glow at all?” Desjardin asks. “There is no one answer to this question and we suspect that different species may ...


2

It's easy to bioengineer a bioluminescent plant. The relevant chemistry doesn't change from plants to jellyfish, so just splice a few genes. They'll be dim enough that you'll barely notice the glow in direct sunlight, but it'll be enough to read by at night. If you want brighter, you'll run into metabolic issues. Would this ever evolve naturally? Hard ...


2

This is semi-science based and more in the spirit of "speaking burning thing". You need a tree that have leaves which are producing a lot of oxygen when they mature. Which is near the same time the seeds are ready to ripe. Now the trees are seeding themself on altitudes where oxygen is scarce due to gravity. But the threes are located in pockets where ...


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