8

What you're describing is not a stupid plot convenience at all and there is already some GM research attempting to make existing crop plants more salt tolerant by crossing them with plants like mangrove trees and seaweed that have different strategies for either resisting salt intake through acidic roots, or methods to excrete it like mangrove trees to. This ...


5

As L.Dutch says, you need heat, but heat isn't incompatible with plantlife. Consider the eucalyptus. Now the eucalyptus isn't just a passive pyrophyte like some, no, it's an active pyrophyte. The eucalyptus pumps flammable oils into the air around it to make fires more common and bigger. Pyromaniac trees The right weather conditions, a dry thunderstorm ...


4

Kind of depends on the weather. If it rains in this world, there are already plants that can live there with practically no modification. Air plants don't need soil at all (sometimes you see them sold on crystals at Whole Foods). Bamboo just uses the ground as a kind of place to anchor while it absorbs water from the soil (the one that has been on my ...


4

Sugars are energy even for a plant. Having so much sugars around is like having free lunch every day. Trouble is that the table might be crowded. Plant would need to develop a lot more symbiotic relations with the surrounding bacteria than usual. I imagine that such world would be swamped by bacteria and insects.


4

My first thought about your description is that perhaps this would not be a place for plants, for the reasons discussed in the comments even. Vegetables may not thrive so well in such a place, with unlimited reserves of an energy source that vegetables produce for themselves, in fact, the entire planet by itself appears to be a plant by itself, which makes ...


3

To create a cyclone you need a source of heat to make air rise on a reasonable large area. Something akin to the storm of fires created by incendiary bombing in WWII. This means that your tree has to: generate a significant amount of heat be spread on a rather large area Normally generating heat above a certain extent is incompatible with life, so if your ...


2

first off welcome to worldbuilding SE.(i know i'm new too) now onto the question ill go down the list. first we have would some species survive and other die? Yes but this all depends. species that run fast are at a disadvantage here because well there wouldn't be as much open space, id assume more nimble species would thrive and ones that climb are very ...


2

Obviously, they'd normally be stricken by scurvy and such They don't need to be so. Letting aside the requirement about fresh water content, certain (not so rare) species of seaweed contain all the C vitamin a human needs (see section 2.4) - even vikings knew them. A combination of seaweeds could cover all the vitamins.


2

Mangroves grow in salt-water, so the salt-filtration concept works in the real world. Some mangroves filter salt from entering in their roots, some mangroves excrete salt they've already accumulated, and some store fresh water internally.


2

Nothing need be done to modify the nature of terrestrial plants to live in your world. Plants are as active (though not ambulatory) and have as much agency as animals. In fact there's the idea that plants mostly tolerate animals because they help move seeds and pollen around. Plants can be tough bastards. Look at the moss living in tundra or the titanic ...


2

This sounds like the carboniferous period of Earth. Fungi hadn't evolved yet that could break down Wood, so trees died, fell over, and DIDN'T rot. Global swampy conditions meant there was an abundance of anoxic environments for plants to get buried and not rot. Much of the coal on Earth was laid down in this time (Thus the name). This was also the period ...


1

Sadly, trees on the scale you are probably picturing simply cannot exist for a few reasons. The most notable is a principle called the square-cube law. Basically as you scale any object up, it's mass increases with a power of 3 where as it's material integrity (measured as a cross section) scales up at a power of 2 meaning that really big things always ...


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