30

You're lucky, this is a case of "nature already did it". A combination of melting resin, high internal pressure and physical tension works for various existing plants such as the squirting cucumber, touch-me-nots, persian silk trees, yellow woodsorrel and violets. You can watch slow-mo videos of them on youtube, decide on which method you prefer and then ...


19

Your concoction is Literal Madness in a bottle In Afghanistan I was routinely awake for days on end, a state achieved by drinking Monster, coffee, and red-bull like it was water. Its been years since I served and my circadian rhythm is still screwed up. Hell, a recent study by the military states that I and my brethren probably have permanent "circadian ...


17

I would say your first question isn't really answerable. If by viable you mean, "Can they exist?" then I think the answer is: not with anything similar to current terrestrial biology, but you could handwave it and say evolution has devised a completely new biochemistry. It seems unlikely, but I'll grant it as it's the whole premise of the question. The ...


14

I asked my brother-in-law, who knows a lot about plants, and he wrote: Monocots and dicots both have only a single embryo per seed. The writer probably got confused by the double fertilization process of zygote and endosperm that occurs in both monocots and dicots. There are a number of extinct and extant non-angiosperm plants that could easily be re-...


13

You have two really good, informative examples (one as an answer, one in the comments) of real-world scenarios. So here is a really wild, out-there but plausible answer. The fruit has formed a really good symbiotic relationship with a particular strain of bacteria. The plant provides these bacteria (located in the fruit pod) with nutrients, and the bacteria ...


12

Every organism needs energy of some sort to survive. There are two basic strategies: go to where the energy is or wait for it to come to you. Both have advantages depending on how plentiful and mobile said energy source is, especially when you consider competition and predation, so it's reasonable to assume you'd find both. Keep in mind that once you have ...


10

As @kingledion said, you cannot simply megadose caffeine to achieve the effects you describe. From a realistic standpoint: there is no known drug that safely keeps you alert for three or four days, sleep is physically and mentally necessary: caffeine doesn't change that your body builds up a tolerance for caffeine even with normal caffeine addiction I'm ...


10

You have to deal with an important problem: Chlorine is way less abundant than Oxygen, thus it makes much harder to build a biochemistry on it. Oxygen is the third most abundant atom in the solar system after Hydrogen and Helium, while Chlorine is about 4 orders of magnitude less abundant. It's simply really hard to develop a biochemistry based on a ...


8

How About: Three cotyledons. A single vein down the main of the leaf with orthogonal feeder veins. giving the leaf a heavy central cylinder that the leaf essentially flops on either side of. Vascular Bundles usual organsied as a honeycomb, or latice like structure. Several Tap roots present. Average three though as high as five or six. For the three case ...


7

Trees actually do have a circulatory system already. It's called the Vascular System. It works rather well too because it can support trees much larger than we are and get nutrients up through the roots all the way out to the leaves to support new growth, and oxygen from the leaves all the way down to the roots to keep the entire organism alive. In point of ...


6

Not really an option the way you want it, where it is always on fire. Fire takes a LOT of energy that the tree needs to build up over time. Let's build a situation where it might make sense to exist with limited time: On the continent of Worse Than Australia, funghi and various insects are a huge threat for plant life. They infest trees and kill them over ...


6

Scientists already have done something like this by mixing genes of plants with genes extracted from bio-luminescent bacteria. For example, this research paper and this article describe the creation of bioluminescent tobacco plants by injecting DNA from Photobacterium leiognathi into Nicotiana tabacum. It looks like the plants glowed green instead of blue, ...


5

Borrow the whole thing intact. https://theherbalacademy.com/3-old-timey-herb-books-you-can-read-online/ On looking into this I was very pleased to find Culpeppers Complete Herbal. https://archive.org/details/cu31924001353279 It is written in chatty period English, with commentary on the herbs, their uses and also his countrymen, foreigners and whatever ...


5

The drug is incredibly hard to find in nature and every attempt to artificially manufacture it has failed. Why is it so hard to find? The fungus it comes from only lives for a certain time, in small patches, and then dies off. It takes so much energy from the soil that it basically kills of the surrounding area, and then itself. The area comes back to life ...


5

Before the accident, she was working on natural solutions to lizard infestation problem. She genetically engineered a plant that smells like good food to lizards, but produces a neurotoxin that kills lizards when they eat it. Genetic engineering cannot do that now, but you are talking about 30th century.


4

Espresso already exists A deadly dose of caffeine is about 10 grams. Every 100 grams of coffee has about 40 mg of caffeine. An 8 ounce cup of coffee will have about 100 mg of caffeine. A shot of espresso has about 200 mg of caffeine per 100 grams. Therefore, the deadly dose of espresso will be about a gallon; but that is the average lethal dose. Medical ...


4

The best Earthly example is the 'dynamite tree' (Hura Crepitans). The mechanism depends on 'dehiscence' which is seam[s] in the seed pod that remain weak while the rest hardens. If the hardening takes place unevenly then stresses can build, like a leaf spring. When the dehiscence zone begins to decay, it will let the springs go, and the seeds can be ...


4

Possible but not likely for a number of reasons: Plants don't interbreed unless they have a recent (for varying values of recent) common ancestor. Also, the ancestor should, in fact be an actual apple tree since you want a similar fruit. It could develop a similar looking fruit on its own but that just makes it more unlikely to happen. Also, an apple is ...


4

Short answer: Yes. Long answer: So: there already exists the art/science of grafting, where a small plant cutting or branch is fastened to a second compatible plant and continues to grow there. Typically when it comes to trees this is done with citrus fruits such as orange, lemon and lime, but apples aren’t that far away (evolutionarily speaking) from the ...


4

Definitely read up on Daniel and the Dragon. https://www.gotquestions.org/Bel-and-the-Dragon.html In the brief but autonomous companion narrative of the dragon (Daniel 14:23–30), "There was a great dragon which the Babylonians revered."[8] In this case the supposed god is no idol, but an animal. However, Daniel slays the dragon by baking pitch, fat,...


4

Pretty much like any other plant. Until you look really closely. Some relevant considerations are as follows: A silicone-based tree will require both a carbon source and a silicon source--however, because carbon plays such a reduced biochemical role (have been replaced in many functions by silicone polymers), the carbon source need not be as accessible. ...


4

Your aliens live in a reducing atmosphere. The atmosphere is methane, ethane and ammonia at temperatures comparable to earth. Water is scarce as you say. Oxygen is toxic to them. The liquids in their body are a combination of ammonia and long chain alkanes, like hexane. They are very flammable and potentially even explosive in an oxygen atmosphere. ...


4

A lot will depend on the "surface" weather, especially regarding winds. In the absense of winds, the most successful plants will be those that can grow the longest leaf-bearing stalks down into the abyss (though somehow "abyss" seems wrong for an endlessly sunlit void). Those with longer stalks will of course be able to get more sun than those with shorter ...


3

Water pressure and weak skin: the plant "pumps" water into the fruit as it ripens, while thinning the skin. When the ripe berries (a type of fruit which just happens to be small) falls to the hard ground, the skin bursts, and the seeds -- which are on the outside of the fruit, by definition of being a berry -- get pushed away.


3

Very interesting question. The first thing that comes to mind is something along the lines of this. But in essence, this occurring naturally would be rather difficult and isn't really your plants creating the electricity so much as it is bacteria. So what about an Enzymatic biofuel cell working off of the glucose your plant naturally produces in the Calvin ...


3

A member of the cucurbit family (same as cucumbers) does accumulate enough pressure to detach and blow-up at the slightest touch. Its liquid content is spitted along with the seeds. The plants belong to the genus ecballium. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecballium If you want to add a chemical explosion, the fruit may contain two sacks of chemicals at its ...


3

Plants aren't typically known for caring for their young. They spread their seeds around and hope for the best. Wolfs and werewolves are typically pack animals. The young are dependent on their mother's milk for nutrients (and protection) in the early years and are slowly weaned off to become independant. Lots of mammals also have shared care for the young. ...


3

Your plant has many long leaves that die away, dry, but keep hanging on the branches. Imagine ivy, but leaves are longer and dried up. When the wind blows, it causes leaves to rub together, and this builds static electricity. If branches are not conductive (very dry, too), leaves would retain that static charge for long time. Rain would render that plant ...


3

There are other options you can use in there. Increase the rate at which people become resistant. It can only be used a few times in a person's life before they're resistant. Make it obvious that someone is under the effect of the drug. Anyone can suggest they do just about anything. Standard process for signing a binding document is for some to suggest ...


3

There exists a thing called the oak apple gall. The galls are produced by a larval insect which hijacks the oak tree to make itself a case to grow in. Instead of some genetically cumbersome mix of parasitic plant and apple tree, have there be oak galls that are edible. I can imagine an insect which does the same thing and creates an apple-like ...


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